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Why should I get the COVID vaccine

White 6

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Wrong.
The spike protein is the key inserted into the ACE2 receptor in order to unlock it.
Exosomes and corona viruses have the same spike protein.
They only look different because the exosome only needs one spike and is much smaller then a whole virus with a corona of spikes.
This image has both exosomes and covid corona virus in it.
The exosomes are Ang 1-9, Ang 1-7, Angll, Exo, and AT1R.
The corona viruses are S1 and MV.


fcell-09-640723-g001.jpg


Your analysis of how the vaccine works, "the vaccine introduces structure that act like the spike protein, once attached, preventing the Coronal virus spike proteins from becoming attached and starting their reproductive process", can't be right because that would just plug entry points into existing cells, and not new cells grown in the future, after the vaccine was gone. Plugging these ACE2 receptors would then also prevent exosome entry, thus preventing any sort of regulation of cells by the body.

No, the point of the vaccine has to be to train the immune system in how to identify and attack invading corona viruses, and that is accomplished by injecting deliberately irritating molecules, that have a corona spike protein on them to help identify them. The vaccine just trains the immune system to attack future irritating molecules with corona spike proteins.

The way vaccines and antibodies work is very different from exosomes and the virus that mimics them.
Here is a diagram on how that works.
R.a59823cd0e17ad48240ebe39666a71f7
I already showed you electron microcope pictures. No cartoons necessary.
"The coronavirus spike protein is a multifunctional molecular machine that mediates coronavirus entry into host cells. It first binds to a receptor on the host cell surface through its S1 subunit and then fuses viral and host membranes through its S2 subunit. Two domains in S1 from different coronaviruses recognize a variety of host receptors, leading to viral attachment. The spike protein exists in two structurally distinct conformations, prefusion and postfusion. The transition from prefusion to postfusion conformation of the spike protein must be triggered, leading to membrane fusion."
Annu Rev Virol
. 2016 Sep 29;3(1):237-261. doi: 10.1146/annurev-virology-110615-042301. Epub 2016 Aug 25

"The spike protein is what gives the coronavirus family of viruses their name. The spikes jut out from the surface of the spherical virus, giving it a crown-like halo, hence “corona”. We have also known for a long time that the spike protein is the business end of these viruses, it is what gives the virus its ability to target, latch onto, and enter the cells that it infects. Mutations in the spike protein are also what determine different variants of SARS-CoV-2, and can alter its ability to infect and cause harm."
"The Pfizer and Moderna vaccines produce the full-length spike protein. Pfizer studied several formulations initially, but found that the full length protein vaccine had fewer side effects and was better tolerated than other vaccine candidates, so that is the one they went with. It is also likely that the full protein contains more epitopes (sites for immune activity) and therefore produces more thorough and longer lasting immunity. The proteins, however, are in a fixed state, they are unable to change their confirmation, which is necessary to bind to cells. So they function differently than spike proteins on infecting virus."

COVID-19 Vaccine-Generated Spike Protein is Safe, Contrary to Viral Claims​

No Evidence Vaccine-Generated Spike Protein Lingers in Bloodstream​


Sorry I do not have any cartoons for you to look at. Maybe you can use your Crayolas and draw your own, be fore your nap.
 

Rigby5

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I already showed you electron microcope pictures. No cartoons necessary.
"The coronavirus spike protein is a multifunctional molecular machine that mediates coronavirus entry into host cells. It first binds to a receptor on the host cell surface through its S1 subunit and then fuses viral and host membranes through its S2 subunit. Two domains in S1 from different coronaviruses recognize a variety of host receptors, leading to viral attachment. The spike protein exists in two structurally distinct conformations, prefusion and postfusion. The transition from prefusion to postfusion conformation of the spike protein must be triggered, leading to membrane fusion."
Annu Rev Virol
. 2016 Sep 29;3(1):237-261. doi: 10.1146/annurev-virology-110615-042301. Epub 2016 Aug 25

"The spike protein is what gives the coronavirus family of viruses their name. The spikes jut out from the surface of the spherical virus, giving it a crown-like halo, hence “corona”. We have also known for a long time that the spike protein is the business end of these viruses, it is what gives the virus its ability to target, latch onto, and enter the cells that it infects. Mutations in the spike protein are also what determine different variants of SARS-CoV-2, and can alter its ability to infect and cause harm."
"The Pfizer and Moderna vaccines produce the full-length spike protein. Pfizer studied several formulations initially, but found that the full length protein vaccine had fewer side effects and was better tolerated than other vaccine candidates, so that is the one they went with. It is also likely that the full protein contains more epitopes (sites for immune activity) and therefore produces more thorough and longer lasting immunity. The proteins, however, are in a fixed state, they are unable to change their confirmation, which is necessary to bind to cells. So they function differently than spike proteins on infecting virus."

COVID-19 Vaccine-Generated Spike Protein is Safe, Contrary to Viral Claims​

No Evidence Vaccine-Generated Spike Protein Lingers in Bloodstream​


Sorry I do not have any cartoons for you to look at. Maybe you can use your Crayolas and draw your own, be fore your nap.

Wrong.
Look at your exosome image again.
1627094342405-png.516587


The head of the exosome pointing down and away, is a round dome.
It is identical to the top of a single corona spike of a covid virus.
It is just that a virus is much larger and has hundreds of these domed, ACE2, receptor site keys.
This exosome is much smaller and only has one because it only needs one, since it is not relying on random chance of it hitting an ACE2 receptor site on a cell.

Virus corona spikes each are nearly identical mimics of an exosome.
That is how the virus gets the cell to let it in.
 

White 6

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Wrong.
Look at your exosome image again.
1627094342405-png.516587


The head of the exosome pointing down and away, is a round dome.
It is identical to the top of a single corona spike of a covid virus.
It is just that a virus is much larger and has hundreds of these domed, ACE2, receptor site keys.
This exosome is much smaller and only has one because it only needs one, since it is not relying on random chance of it hitting an ACE2 receptor site on a cell.

Virus corona spikes each are nearly identical mimics of an exosome.
That is how the virus gets the cell to let it in.
Except for not having a spike proteins, you are correct. They both depict what appears to be exosomes, the coronavirus has it's spiked proteins. It is the spiked proteins and their function that is the problem. In the corona virus, I have read the spike proteins with the genetic mutation information are free floating, attaching themselves to an exosome (of various bodily organs) that then uses their genetic information to recreate the virus instead of the organ tissue of the original body organ exosome prior to attachment. The spike proteins of the exosome structures of the virus are sealed to the structure, not to be free floating and attaching or attacking random organs in the body. Of course, that is speaking as an honors graduate, business major. What is your degree in, again? I don't believe you said.
 

Rigby5

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Except for not having a spike proteins, you are correct. They both depict what appears to be exosomes, the coronavirus has it's spiked proteins. It is the spiked proteins and their function that is the problem. In the corona virus, I have read the spike proteins with the genetic mutation information are free floating, attaching themselves to an exosome (of various bodily organs) that then uses their genetic information to recreate the virus instead of the organ tissue of the original body organ exosome prior to attachment. The spike proteins of the exosome structures of the virus are sealed to the structure, not to be free floating and attaching or attacking random organs in the body. Of course, that is speaking as an honors graduate, business major. What is your degree in, again? I don't believe you said.

Sorry, but you still have this confused.
An exosome has to have a single protein spike at its head.

The covid virus does not attach itself to exosomes.
Exosomes are small, even smaller than viruses, and do not have any replication capability.
What both exosomes and viruses attach to is a normal human cell.
A normal human cell is much larger than both exosomes or viruses.
A normal human cell also has a nucleus where reproduction goes on.

Exosomes are just very small messengers, used to carry regulatory information, from and to ordinary human cells.
And to be able to do that, cells have to have a means of budding off and receptor sites for accepting them.
And a virus takes advantage of these ACE2 receptor sites intended for exosomes.
{...
Exosomes are membrane-bound extracellular vesicles (EVs) that are produced in the endosomal compartment of most eukaryotic cells.[1][2][3] The multivesicular body (MVB) is an endosome defined by intraluminal vesicles (ILVs) that bud inward into the endosomal lumen. If the MVB fuses with the cell surface (the plasma membrane), these ILVs are released as exosomes.

In multicellular organisms, exosomes and other EVs were discovered in biological fluids including blood, urine and cerebrospinal fluid. Importantly, exosomes were also identified within the tissue matrix, coined Matrix-Bound Nanovesicles (MBV).[4] They are also released in vitro by cultured cells into their growth medium.[5][6][7] Since the size of exosomes is limited by that of the parent MVB, exosomes are generally thought to be smaller than most other EVs, from about 30 to 150 nanometres (nm) in diameter: around the same size as many lipoproteins but much smaller than cells.[5]

Compared with EVs in general, it is unclear whether exosomes have unique characteristics or functions or can be separated or distinguished effectively from other EVs.[1] EVs including exosomes carry markers of cells of origin and have specialized functions in physiological processes, from coagulation and intercellular signalling to waste management.[5] Consequently, there is a growing interest in clinical applications of EVs as biomarkers and therapies alike,[8] prompting establishment of an International Society for Extracellular Vesicles (ISEV) and a scientific journal devoted to EVs, the Journal of Extracellular Vesicles.
...}

As for credentials, physics degrees, engineering career, but that often was medical, such as working on pacemakers.
 
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White 6

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Sorry, but you still have this confused.
An exosome has to have a single protein spike at its head.

The covid virus does not attach itself to exosomes.
Exosomes are small, even smaller than viruses, and do not have any replication capability.
What both exosomes and viruses attach to is a normal human cell.
A normal human cell is much larger than both exosomes or viruses.
A normal human cell also has a nucleus where reproduction goes on.

Exosomes are just very small messengers, used to carry regulatory information, from and to ordinary human cells.
And to be able to do that, cells have to have a means of budding off and receptor sites for accepting them.
And a virus takes advantage of these ACE2 receptor sites intended for exosomes.
{...
Exosomes are membrane-bound extracellular vesicles (EVs) that are produced in the endosomal compartment of most eukaryotic cells.[1][2][3] The multivesicular body (MVB) is an endosome defined by intraluminal vesicles (ILVs) that bud inward into the endosomal lumen. If the MVB fuses with the cell surface (the plasma membrane), these ILVs are released as exosomes.

In multicellular organisms, exosomes and other EVs were discovered in biological fluids including blood, urine and cerebrospinal fluid. Importantly, exosomes were also identified within the tissue matrix, coined Matrix-Bound Nanovesicles (MBV).[4] They are also released in vitro by cultured cells into their growth medium.[5][6][7] Since the size of exosomes is limited by that of the parent MVB, exosomes are generally thought to be smaller than most other EVs, from about 30 to 150 nanometres (nm) in diameter: around the same size as many lipoproteins but much smaller than cells.[5]

Compared with EVs in general, it is unclear whether exosomes have unique characteristics or functions or can be separated or distinguished effectively from other EVs.[1] EVs including exosomes carry markers of cells of origin and have specialized functions in physiological processes, from coagulation and intercellular signalling to waste management.[5] Consequently, there is a growing interest in clinical applications of EVs as biomarkers and therapies alike,[8] prompting establishment of an International Society for Extracellular Vesicles (ISEV) and a scientific journal devoted to EVs, the Journal of Extracellular Vesicles.
...}

As for credentials, physics degrees, engineering career, but that often was medical, such as working on pacemakers.
Glad you finally read the Wikipedia article on exosomes. It took you long enough. Better stick with engineering and go get a Covid-19 vaccination, before you catch something you don't want.
 

Rigby5

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Glad you finally read the Wikipedia article on exosomes. It took you long enough. Better stick with engineering and go get a Covid-19 vaccination, before you catch something you don't want.

Wrong.
I had to read up on exosome about 20 years ago, because they are involved in regulating heart rate.
Being in health care, I also had to get vaccinated a almost a year ago, involuntarily.
 

White 6

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Wrong.
I had to read up on exosome about 20 years ago, because they are involved in regulating heart rate.
Being in health care, I also had to get vaccinated a almost a year ago, involuntarily.
You are better off for it, probably. Have you been hospitalized for Covid, since that time, or grown a extra body part where you didn't already have one?
 

Rigby5

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You are better off for it, probably. Have you been hospitalized for Covid, since that time, or grown a extra body part where you didn't already have one?

The 2nd Moderna was just the worst experience of my entire life.
Started about 11 hours after injection.
Sudden chill of extremities, with convulsive shivering.
I would not have been able to drive or even walk, if I had to.
Throwing up every 4 hours for the first day.
Bed ridden for a week with a fever.
Headaches and weakness for 3 weeks.
 

White 6

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The 2nd Moderna was just the worst experience of my entire life.
Started about 11 hours after injection.
Sudden chill of extremities, with convulsive shivering.
I would not have been able to drive or even walk, if I had to.
Throwing up every 4 hours for the first day.
Bed ridden for a week with a fever.
Headaches and weakness for 3 weeks.
Wow. Never had a reaction to any vaccination, like that, not even the plague vaccine (though some did, but all returned to duty within 24 hours.
I had Moderna lots, 010A21A and 040A21A. Nothing like your experience and somebody said if you have had Covid-19 you had a better chance of a stronger reaction. Do you have a history of problems after vaccines when you were a kid or military?
 

Rigby5

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Wow. Never had a reaction to any vaccination, like that, not even the plague vaccine (though some did, but all returned to duty within 24 hours.
I had Moderna lots, 010A21A and 040A21A. Nothing like your experience and somebody said if you have had Covid-19 you had a better chance of a stronger reaction. Do you have a history of problems after vaccines when you were a kid or military?

Never had much health problems as an adult.
Had a bunch of childhood illnesses though, like whooping cough, ear infections, scarlatina, etc.
But I am 71 now.
They also say the more reaction, the stronger the immunity?
 

White 6

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Never had much health problems as an adult.
Had a bunch of childhood illnesses though, like whooping cough, ear infections, scarlatina, etc.
But I am 71 now.
They also say the more reaction, the stronger the immunity?
Yes. I hear that also. Who knows. I heard there might be stronger reaction after 2nd shot. True for you, but not for me. We hear all sorts of crap and much of it is bs.
Hopefully you are over all of it now. I am heading to a Covid-19 Delta hotspot in 16 days. Hopefully the protection from or at least the lessening effects due to having the vaccines will not turn out to be BS. I am still not worried about any long term negative effects popping up.
At your age, there is no reason for you to allow yourself to be forced to take a vaccine or do anything else. If you really did not want it, you were free to tell them to kiss off and retired on the spot. I retired at age 60, just because I could, and I owed nothing to the rat race or anybody in it. Best move I ever made. I have no problem finding things to do, to entertain myself.
 

OldLady

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Never had much health problems as an adult.
Had a bunch of childhood illnesses though, like whooping cough, ear infections, scarlatina, etc.
But I am 71 now.
They also say the more reaction, the stronger the immunity?
Not what I heard. But you've got immunity, so that's a very good thing.

 

Rigby5

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Yes. I hear that also. Who knows. I heard there might be stronger reaction after 2nd shot. True for you, but not for me. We hear all sorts of crap and much of it is bs.
Hopefully you are over all of it now. I am heading to a Covid-19 Delta hotspot in 16 days. Hopefully the protection from or at least the lessening effects due to having the vaccines will not turn out to be BS. I am still not worried about any long term negative effects popping up.
At your age, there is no reason for you to allow yourself to be forced to take a vaccine or do anything else. If you really did not want it, you were free to tell them to kiss off and retired on the spot. I retired at age 60, just because I could, and I owed nothing to the rat race or anybody in it. Best move I ever made. I have no problem finding things to do, to entertain myself.

I want to volunteer teaching in the pueblos, and since they are so concerned about the virus in their large extended family groups, that I felt compelled to comply with the vaccine.
 

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