Zone1 Is Hell FOREVER or does God destroy it absolutely in the End?

1miseryindex

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Well, I don't know.. Whom do we consult on this important matter?

Protestants?
Catholics?
Both?

Both faith communities are messed up, as we all know. Where can we find the answer?

Hey, I know.. How about Jesus Christ and His Word? In Mt 25:31 and other psgs, Jesus speaks of ETERNAL damnation aka punishment. So, you'd think that would settle matters. If not, here is a (an admittedly lengthy!) commentary from an ERUDITE theologian

I found this at novusordo.watch.net, not sure who the author is, but again, the Sedevacantist Catholics (that site is Sede) have the Truth on their side vis a vis the Vatican and its corruption/heresies. That's not necessarily a reason to stop going to NO Churches (??)

I copied it to read in full later --though, so far, it seems I could have written a lot of it myself.

(Yours truly bolded certain parts)



Theologian at Novusordowatch
(who uses Christ's Words to refute Francis's)



Francis once again displayed his masterful skills of distorting Sacred Scripture when what it teaches doesn’t jibe with his false gospel of forgiveness without repentance, which, far from demonstrating God’s great mercy for sinners, makes a mockery of the Redemption and only assists souls in going to hell, not to Heaven.

Our Lord, we must recall, pardoned only one of the two thieves crucified with Him, because only one was contrite. In this manner He taught us never to despair of His mercy, but at the same time never to presume on it either. Both despair and presumption are mortal sins — the Catholic medium between the two is the theological virtue of hope.

The Gospel reading for the Novus Ordo Missae (not the traditional missal) last Sunday, June 25, 2023, was Matthew 10:26-33.. We will quote the passage in full, first from the traditional Catholic Douay-Rheims translation, then from the translation used in the official Novus Ordo lectionary of the United States: Matthew 10:26-33 (Douay-Rheims)

Therefore fear them not. For nothing is covered that shall not be revealed: nor hid, that shall not be known. That which I tell you in the dark, speak ye in the light: and that which you hear in the ear, preach ye upon the housetops. And fear ye not them that kill the body, and are not able to kill the soul: but rather fear him that can destroy both soul and body in hell. Are not two sparrows sold for a farthing? and not one of them shall fall on the ground without your Father. But the very hairs of your head are all numbered. Fear not therefore: better are you than many sparrows. Every one therefore that shall confess me before men, I will also confess him before my Father who is in heaven. But he that shall deny me before men, I will also deny him before my Father who is in heaven.

Matthew 10:26-33 (USCCB Lectionary)

Jesus said to the Twelve: “Fear no one. Nothing is concealed that will not be revealed, nor secret that will not be known. What I say to you in the darkness, speak in the light; what you hear whispered, proclaim on the housetops. And do not be afraid of those who kill the body but cannot kill the soul; rather, be afraid of the one who can destroy both soul and body in Gehenna. Are not two sparrows sold for a small coin? Yet not one of them falls to the ground without your Father’s knowledge. Even all the hairs of your head are counted. So do not be afraid; you are worth more than many sparrows. Everyone who acknowledges me before others I will acknowledge before my heavenly Father. But whoever denies me before others, I will deny before my heavenly Father.”

These words of [Jesus] are consoling in that they encourage and edify the soul by pointing out that although eternal damnation is a real and acute danger, nevertheless God will provide all the graces needed for us to win the battle against sin and temptation.. We are not left to our weakness; God will help us..

Our Lord.. warns that he who, not cooperating with the graces given him, will “deny me before men, I will also deny him before my Father who is in Heaven.” That’s a rather exclusionary message, one that clearly doesn’t work for Bergoglio’s new “big tent” synodal church. .

Knowing that we must tread the way of the Cross with Him if we are to persevere in grace (see Lk 9:23), our Lord warns that we must be willing to sacrifice any material good — even physical life itself — if necessary to preserve the state of sanctifying grace, which is the spiritual life of the soul: “And do not be afraid of those who kill the body but cannot kill the soul; rather, be afraid of the one who can destroy both soul and body in Gehenna.” Fr. Cornelius à Lapidé (1567-1637):

Verse 28. “And fear ye not them that kill the body, and are not able to kill the soul: but rather fear him that can destroy both soul and body in hell..” The sense is: Do not, from fear of death with which the persecutors will threaten you, deny My Faith, or cease from the preaching which I have commanded you, or commit any act unworthy of it, for if ye do this, ye will incur both the death of the body and the far worse and longer-lasting death of the soul, even its eternal death in hell, where the damned die an undying death, because they are constantly live [sic] in mortal torments and endure as though in living death and moribund life, according to Isaias 66:24, Their worm shall not die, and their fire shall not be quenched. Truly does S. Chrysostom say (hom. 5 ad pop.), “He who is always afraid of hell will never fall into its flames, for he is continually purified by this fear.”

Verse 33. But he that shall deny me before men, I will also deny him before my Father who is in heaven. Christ adds this, so that whoever is not moved by His magnificent promise, might be daunted by the terrible threat, that just as Christ will acknowledge those who acknowledge Him, so too, He will deny those who deny Him, saying, I never knew you. Depart from me, you that work iniquity! (Matth. 7:23), that is, go to hell, to Lucifer, whom you serve (Matth. 25:12 ff.).

à Lapide: Gospel.. Mt

There is no question that Christ’s doctrine is challenging — Christianity is not for wimps — but it is not difficult to understand. Notice that our Blessed Lord in His great goodness is pleased to present this particular doctrine in the context of His generous assistance of providing the graces necessary to persevere. That is why He can say in another place: “For my yoke is sweet and my burden light” (Mt 11:3). Our Redeemer does not leave us out in the cold, so to speak, with the dreadful prospect of having to give our lives for Him based on our own strength. No, He makes clear that He will sustain us through all trials if only we are faithful to Him. If, however, we fail to cooperate with His graces and deny Him, and if we persist in this frightful state until death, He will then also deny us. We can see, then, how very serious the matter is.

Francis twists Christ’s Words to make them compatible with Naturalism

The Gospel reading of last Sunday is, then, not terribly difficult to make sense of. Francis had a terrific opportunity … to remind people that all is lost if we lose our souls.. that this temporal life is as nothing when compared to eternity. Hell, eternal damnation, is a very real possibility, and we must arm ourselves with prayers, good works, and self-denial..

In today’s Gospel, Jesus repeats to his disciples three different times: “have no fear” (Mt 10:26, 28, 31). Shortly prior to this, he had spoken to them about the persecutions they would have to undergo for the Gospel, a fact that is still a reality. Since its beginning, in fact, the Church has experienced, together with joys – of which she has had many – many persecutions. It seems paradoxical: the proclamation of the Kingdom of God is a message of peace and justice, founded on fraternal charity and on forgiveness; and yet it meets with opposition, violence, persecution. Jesus, however, says not to fear, not because everything will be all right in the world, no, but because we are precious to his Father and nothing that is good will be lost. He therefore tells us not to let fear block us, but rather to fear one other thing, only one. What is the thing Jesus tells us we should fear?

We discover what it is through an image Jesus uses today: the image of “Gehenna” (cf. v. 28). The valley of “Gehenna” was a place the inhabitants of Jerusalem knew well. It was the city’s large garbage dump. Jesus speaks about it in order to say that the true fear we should have, is that of throwing away one’s own life. Jesus says, “Yes, be afraid of that”. It was like saying: you do not need so much to be afraid of suffering misunderstanding and criticism, of losing prestige and economic advantages to remain faithful to the Gospel, no, but of wasting your existence in the pursuit of trivial things that do not fill life with meaning.

This is important for us today. Even today, in fact, some are ridiculed or discriminated against for not following certain fads, which, however, place second-rate realities at the centre – for example, to follow after things instead of people, achievement instead of relationships. Let us give an example: I am thinking of some parents who need to work to maintain their family, but who cannot live for work alone – they need enough time to be with their children. I am also thinking of a priest or a sister who need to dedicate themselves to their service, without, however, forgetting to dedicate time to be with Jesus, otherwise, they will fall into spiritual worldliness and lose the sense of who they are. And again, I am thinking of a young man or woman who have thousands of commitments and passions – school, sports, various interests, cell phones and social networks – but who need to meet people and achieve great dreams, without losing time on passing things that do not leave their mark.

All of this, brothers and sisters, requires some renunciation regarding the idols of efficiency and consumerism. But this is necessary so as not to get lost in things that end up getting thrown out, as they threw things out in Gehenna back then. And people often end up in today’s Gehenna’s, instead. Let’s think, of the least who are often treated like waste products and unwanted objects. There is a cost to remain faithful to what counts. The cost is going against the tide, the cost is freeing oneself from being conditioned by popular opinion, the cost is being separated from those who “follow the current”. But it does not matter, Jesus says. What matters is not to throw away the greatest good: life. This is the only thing that should frighten us.
(Antipope Francis.. June 25, 2023)

…Perhaps we should be grateful that Bergoglio didn’t turn Christ’s warning about Gehenna into a sermon about the importance of recycling!

Francis… tries to get his hearers’ thoughts away from the supernatural and ..focused on [earthly] life

In today’s Gospel, Jesus repeats to his disciples three different times: “have no fear” (Mt 10:26, 28, 31). Shortly prior to this, he had spoken to them about the persecutions they would have to undergo for the Gospel, a fact that is still a reality. Since its beginning, in fact, the Church has experienced, together with joys – of which she has had many – many persecutions. It seems paradoxical: the proclamation of the Kingdom of God is a message of peace and justice, founded on fraternal charity and on forgiveness; and yet it meets with opposition, violence, persecution. Jesus, however, says not to fear, not because everything will be all right in the world, no, but because we are precious to his Father and nothing that is good will be lost. He therefore tells us not to let fear block us, but rather to fear one other thing, only one. What is the thing Jesus tells us we should fear?

… Certainly, peace, justice, charity, and forgiveness are part of the Gospel, but it cannot be reduced to that. The Good News of Jesus Christ is not the Kiwanis club with prayer.

If Francis actually taught the… full Gospel… he would see.. quickly why it meets with opposition from the world.

Christ was hated because, unlike Bergoglio, He did not preach a ‘hippie’ gospel. Rather, His preaching convicted the world of sin (cf. Jn 3:19; 16:8) and demanded the strictest standards of morality. For example, not only did Jesus condemn the external act of murder, but even uncharitable speech and hateful thoughts (see Mt 5:21-22); not only did He condemn the external act of adultery, as did the Jews as well, He made clear that even the least deliberately-willed impure thought was already an infraction of the divine law, and that it would be better to suffer any temporal sacrifice rather than commit mortal sin (see Mt 5:27-30). He sanctified matrimony by raising it to a grace-giving sacrament and restoring to it its original indissolubility (see Mt 5:31-32).

Christ preached the way of the Cross. He demanded not a merely external sanctity but one that consists in a true and inward renewal (rebirth) of the whole person (see Mt 5:20; Jn 3:5-6). He condemned vengeance… (see Mt 5:38-39). He demanded that we conform our lives to His (see Mt 11:29), exhorted all who can take it to perfect chastity (see Mt 19:11-12), and demanded that we love our neighbor as we love our very own selves (see Mk 12:31), even our enemies (see Mt 5:43-47). .

..He demanded that God be loved first and above all things (see Mk 12:29-30), including one’s family, relations, friends, and even life itself:

Do not think that I came to send peace upon earth: I came not to send peace, but the sword. For I came to set a man at variance against his father, and the daughter against her mother, and the daughter in law against her mother in law. And a man’s enemies shall be they of his own household. He that loveth father or mother more than me, is not worthy of me; and he that loveth son or daughter more than me, is not worthy of me. And he that taketh not up his cross, and followeth me, is not worthy of me. He that findeth his life, shall lose it: and he that shall lose his life for me, shall find it. (Matthew 10:34-39)

That is not the gospel preached by Bergoglio. No wonder the fake pope can’t figure out why anyone would oppose the Gospel! The true Gospel is not popular, not attractive to fallen man because it convicts him of sin and demands that he amend his ways under pain of eternal damnation. It requires self-denial, obedience to ecclesiastical authority, and sometimes even heroic sacrifices to save one’s soul: “…the kingdom of heaven suffereth violence, and the violent bear it away” (Mt 11:12).

“Gehenna” is used by our Lord as a metaphor for hell. The Catholic Encyclopedia explains:

…in the New Testament the term Gehenna is used more frequently in preference to hades, as a name for the place of punishment of the damned. Gehenna is the Hebrew gê-hinnom (Nehemiah 11:30), or the longer form gê-ben-hinnom (Joshua 15:8), and gê-benê-hinnom (2 Kings 23:10) “valley of the sons of Hinnom”. Hinnom seems to be the name of a person not otherwise known. The Valley of Hinnom is south of Jerusalem and is now called Wadi er-rababi. It was notorious as the scene, in earlier days, of the horrible worship of Moloch. For this reason it was defiled by Josias (2 Kings 23:10), cursed by Jeremias (Jeremiah 7:31-33), and held in abomination by the Jews, who, accordingly, used the name of this valley to designate the abode of the damned (Targ. Jon., Gen., iii, 24; Henoch, c. xxvi). And Christ adopted this usage of the term. (The Catholic Encyclopedia, s.v. “Hell”)

Interestingly enough, even Bergoglio’s own so-called Catechism of the Catholic Church notes:

Jesus often speaks of “Gehenna,” of “the unquenchable fire” reserved for those who to the end of their lives refuse to believe and be converted, where both soul and body can be lost. Jesus solemnly proclaims that he “will send his angels, and they will gather . . . all evil doers, and throw them into the furnace of fire,” and that he will pronounce the condemnation: “Depart from me, you cursed, into the eternal fire!” (Catechism of the Catholic Church, n. 1034)

So, when Francis says that Christ speaks about Gehenna “in order to say that the true fear we should have, is that of throwing away one’s own life”, that is inaccurate — He specifically warns against throwing one’s soul away, and He distinguishes it clearly from the life of the body. Notice how the false pope omits this crucial distinction and instead conflates both into “life”, hoping no one will notice.

Why Francis does this becomes apparent when we look at what he says immediately after, namely: “It was like saying: you do not need so much to be afraid of suffering misunderstanding and criticism, of losing prestige and economic advantages to remain faithful to the Gospel, no, but of wasting your existence in the pursuit of trivial things that do not fill life with meaning.”

Now it is clear: Bergoglio had to erase Christ’s contrast between the life of the body and the life of the soul in order to be able to make the divine warning about throwing your soul away (namely, into hell) into something about not “wasting your existence in the pursuit of trivial things that do not fill life with meaning”. Obviously, that is not what Christ said… Nor does life have to be “filled” with meaning, as if the meaning of our existence were something to be produced by us and not found in God and the Beatific Vision to which He has called us. But then those are supernatural things, and Francis wants to steer souls away from the supernatural and keep them focused on the things of the earth, lest they be saved: “He that is of the earth, of the earth he is, and of the earth he speaketh” (Jn 3:31).

The whole point of Christ’s warning in the Gospel passage is that one can spend one’s entire life doing non-trivial things — things that are good, legitimate, and important in themselves — and still go to hell! For example, a surgeon who saves lives every day for thirty years, or a social worker who frequently feeds the hungry, or an architect who designs the most magnificent cathedrals, all these people are doing good things but if they do not die in the state of sanctifying grace, they will merit only eternal damnation — not for the good things they did, of course, but for their mortal sins, which can only be blotted out with sanctifying grace, which cannot be “purchased” with naturally good works. Denial of this would constitute the heresy of Pelagianism — salvation by works without grace.

Francis:

... Even today, in fact, some are ridiculed or discriminated against for not following certain fads, which, however, place second-rate realities at the centre – for example, to follow after things instead of people, achievement instead of relationships. Let us give an example: I am thinking of some parents who need to work to maintain their family, but who cannot live for work alone – they need enough time to be with their children. I am also thinking of a priest or a sister who need to dedicate themselves to their service, without, however, forgetting to dedicate time to be with Jesus, otherwise, they will fall into spiritual worldliness and lose the sense of who they are. And again, I am thinking of a young man or woman who have thousands of commitments and passions – school, sports, various interests, cell phones and social networks – but who need to meet people and achieve great dreams, without losing time on passing things that do not leave their mark.

So here Francis simply doubles down on his distortion of the holy words of our Lord. One can follow after “people” and “relationships” instead of things and achievements all one’s life long — but if one dies in the state of mortal sin, everything will be lost… Francis is diverting people’s attention from the actual words of Christ to a fanciful reading that is compatible with his own [narrative].

The false pope is bluntly taking Christ’s exhortation not to lose one’s eternal life for the sake of one’s temporal life and twisting it into a Naturalist message of not to spend one’s temporal life on the trivial but rather on the meaningful. That is not what Christ said, nor is it what He meant! And Bergoglio knows it, obviously. All temporal life will end at death, “and after this the judgment” (Heb 9:27). If the soul is in the state of mortal sin, hell will be its eternal destiny. But that is a pesky little detail Bergoglio is bending over backwards to conceal from those who are unhappily seeking instruction from his blasphemous mouth.

Francis denounces figurative “idols”… (not so much literal idols):

All of this, brothers and sisters, requires some renunciation regarding the idols of efficiency and consumerism. But this is necessary so as not to get lost in things that end up getting thrown out, as they threw things out in Gehenna back then. And people often end up in today’s Gehenna’s, instead. Let’s think, of the least who are often treated like waste products and unwanted objects. There is a cost to remain faithful to what counts. The cost is going against the tide, the cost is freeing oneself from being conditioned by popular opinion, the cost is being separated from those who “follow the current”. But it does not matter, Jesus says. What matters is not to throw away the greatest good: life. This is the only thing that should frighten us.

So here the pseudo-papal shyster desperately tries to introduce one of his favorite talking points, which hinges on Gehenna having been a garbage dump. He then blatantly lies again by claiming that Christ’s teaching is: “What matters is not to throw away the greatest good: life.” No, this earthly life is not the greatest good, eternal life in Heaven is:

And calling the multitude together with his disciples, he said to them: If any man will follow me, let him deny himself, and take up his cross, and follow me. For whosoever will save his life, shall lose it: and whosoever shall lose his life for my sake and the gospel, shall save it. For what shall it profit a man, if he gain the whole world, and suffer the loss of his soul. Or what shall a man give in exchange for his soul? For he that shall be ashamed of me, and of my words, in this adulterous and sinful generation: the Son of man also will be ashamed of him, when he shall come in the glory of his Father with the holy angels. (Mark 8:34-38)

Francis adds insult to injury when in his very last paragraph he warns against “not putting [the] Gospel in first place”:

So let us ask ourselves: I, what do I fear? Not having what I like? Not reaching the goals society imposes? The judgement of others? Or rather of not pleasing the Lord, and not putting his Gospel in first place? Mary, ever Virgin, Mother most Wise, help us to be wise and courageous in the choices we make.

This false pope is a master deceiver, and he is audacious in his deception, for he denies the Gospel straight to your face and then exhorts you never to deny the Gospel. Bergoglio preaches “a charity without faith, very accommodating to unbelievers, which unfortunately opens the way to eternal ruin for all”, as Pope St. Pius X warned in his allocution of Apr. 17, 1907.

‘Pope’ Francis, Apostle of Hell

As we have seen, the true Gospel is supernatural; it is concerned first and foremost with eternal salvation, without which all is lost forever. The Gospel is not a sentimental collection of platitudes about human dignity, tolerance, unconditional acceptance and forgiveness, caresses and tenderness, or helping the needy. It is also not about dreaming, welcoming, including, accompanying, or affirming everyone and everything. That is Bergoglio’s false Naturalist gospel of man, not the true supernatural Gospel of Jesus Christ.

Christ became incarnate so we would be freed from the bondage of sin and be able to go to Heaven. He preached the truth about the fallen human condition and the divinely-given remedy, offering Himself as the Divine-Human Sacrifice to atone for our sins and purchase us back from the dominion of the evil one. Christ did not become man in order to preach a generic, interreligious “message of peace and justice, founded on fraternal charity and on forgiveness”.

This past Sunday, it is clear that Francis went out of his way to avoid speaking about eternal damnation; he instead bent over backwards to come up with some other “interpretation” of Christ’s plain words. But why? Who would have an interest in keeping the truth about hell away from souls?

Would it be our dear Lord Jesus, who suffered and died for souls precisely so they would not end up there and who Himself warned of the reality of the danger of hell throughout His earthly ministry? Or would it be Satan, the devil, who wants to see as many souls eternally damned as possible?
 
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Well, I don't know.. Whom do we consult on this important matter?

Protestants?
Catholics?
Both?

Both faith communities are messed up, as we all know. Where can we find the answer?

Hey, I know.. How about Jesus Christ and His Word? In Mt 25:31 and other psgs, Jesus speaks of ETERNAL damnation aka punishment. So, you'd think that would settle matters. If not, here is a (an admittedly lengthy!) commentary from an ERUDITE theologian

I found this at novusordo.watch.net, not sure who the author is, but again, the Sedevacantist Catholics (that site is Sede) have the Truth on their side vis a vis the Vatican and its corruption/heresies. I copied it to read in full later --though, so far, it seems I could have written a lot of it myself.

(Yours truly bolded certain parts)



Theologian at Novusordowatch
(who uses Christ's Words to refute Francis's)



Francis once again displayed his masterful skills of distorting Sacred Scripture when what it teaches doesn’t jibe with his false gospel of forgiveness without repentance, which, far from demonstrating God’s great mercy for sinners, makes a mockery of the Redemption and only assists souls in going to hell, not to Heaven.

Our Lord, we must recall, pardoned only one of the two thieves crucified with Him, because only one was contrite. In this manner He taught us never to despair of His mercy, but at the same time never to presume on it either. Both despair and presumption are mortal sins — the Catholic medium between the two is the theological virtue of hope.

The Gospel reading for the Novus Ordo Missae (not the traditional missal) last Sunday, June 25, 2023, was Matthew 10:26-33.. We will quote the passage in full, first from the traditional Catholic Douay-Rheims translation, then from the translation used in the official Novus Ordo lectionary of the United States: Matthew 10:26-33 (Douay-Rheims)

Therefore fear them not. For nothing is covered that shall not be revealed: nor hid, that shall not be known. That which I tell you in the dark, speak ye in the light: and that which you hear in the ear, preach ye upon the housetops. And fear ye not them that kill the body, and are not able to kill the soul: but rather fear him that can destroy both soul and body in hell. Are not two sparrows sold for a farthing? and not one of them shall fall on the ground without your Father. But the very hairs of your head are all numbered. Fear not therefore: better are you than many sparrows. Every one therefore that shall confess me before men, I will also confess him before my Father who is in heaven. But he that shall deny me before men, I will also deny him before my Father who is in heaven.

Matthew 10:26-33 (USCCB Lectionary)

Jesus said to the Twelve: “Fear no one. Nothing is concealed that will not be revealed, nor secret that will not be known. What I say to you in the darkness, speak in the light; what you hear whispered, proclaim on the housetops. And do not be afraid of those who kill the body but cannot kill the soul; rather, be afraid of the one who can destroy both soul and body in Gehenna. Are not two sparrows sold for a small coin? Yet not one of them falls to the ground without your Father’s knowledge. Even all the hairs of your head are counted. So do not be afraid; you are worth more than many sparrows. Everyone who acknowledges me before others I will acknowledge before my heavenly Father. But whoever denies me before others, I will deny before my heavenly Father.”

These words of [Jesus] are consoling in that they encourage and edify the soul by pointing out that although eternal damnation is a real and acute danger, nevertheless God will provide all the graces needed for us to win the battle against sin and temptation.. We are not left to our weakness; God will help us..

Our Lord.. warns that he who, not cooperating with the graces given him, will “deny me before men, I will also deny him before my Father who is in Heaven.” That’s a rather exclusionary message, one that clearly doesn’t work for Bergoglio’s new “big tent” synodal church. .

Knowing that we must tread the way of the Cross with Him if we are to persevere in grace (see Lk 9:23), our Lord warns that we must be willing to sacrifice any material good — even physical life itself — if necessary to preserve the state of sanctifying grace, which is the spiritual life of the soul: “And do not be afraid of those who kill the body but cannot kill the soul; rather, be afraid of the one who can destroy both soul and body in Gehenna.” Fr. Cornelius à Lapidé (1567-1637):

Verse 28. “And fear ye not them that kill the body, and are not able to kill the soul: but rather fear him that can destroy both soul and body in hell..” The sense is: Do not, from fear of death with which the persecutors will threaten you, deny My Faith, or cease from the preaching which I have commanded you, or commit any act unworthy of it, for if ye do this, ye will incur both the death of the body and the far worse and longer-lasting death of the soul, even its eternal death in hell, where the damned die an undying death, because they are constantly live [sic] in mortal torments and endure as though in living death and moribund life, according to Isaias 66:24, Their worm shall not die, and their fire shall not be quenched. Truly does S. Chrysostom say (hom. 5 ad pop.), “He who is always afraid of hell will never fall into its flames, for he is continually purified by this fear.”

Verse 33. But he that shall deny me before men, I will also deny him before my Father who is in heaven. Christ adds this, so that whoever is not moved by His magnificent promise, might be daunted by the terrible threat, that just as Christ will acknowledge those who acknowledge Him, so too, He will deny those who deny Him, saying, I never knew you. Depart from me, you that work iniquity! (Matth. 7:23), that is, go to hell, to Lucifer, whom you serve (Matth. 25:12 ff.).

à Lapide: Gospel.. Mt

There is no question that Christ’s doctrine is challenging — Christianity is not for wimps — but it is not difficult to understand. Notice that our Blessed Lord in His great goodness is pleased to present this particular doctrine in the context of His generous assistance of providing the graces necessary to persevere. That is why He can say in another place: “For my yoke is sweet and my burden light” (Mt 11:3). Our Redeemer does not leave us out in the cold, so to speak, with the dreadful prospect of having to give our lives for Him based on our own strength. No, He makes clear that He will sustain us through all trials if only we are faithful to Him. If, however, we fail to cooperate with His graces and deny Him, and if we persist in this frightful state until death, He will then also deny us. We can see, then, how very serious the matter is.

Francis twists Christ’s Words to make them compatible with Naturalism

The Gospel reading of last Sunday is, then, not terribly difficult to make sense of. Francis had a terrific opportunity … to remind people that all is lost if we lose our souls.. that this temporal life is as nothing when compared to eternity. Hell, eternal damnation, is a very real possibility, and we must arm ourselves with prayers, good works, and self-denial..

In today’s Gospel, Jesus repeats to his disciples three different times: “have no fear” (Mt 10:26, 28, 31). Shortly prior to this, he had spoken to them about the persecutions they would have to undergo for the Gospel, a fact that is still a reality. Since its beginning, in fact, the Church has experienced, together with joys – of which she has had many – many persecutions. It seems paradoxical: the proclamation of the Kingdom of God is a message of peace and justice, founded on fraternal charity and on forgiveness; and yet it meets with opposition, violence, persecution. Jesus, however, says not to fear, not because everything will be all right in the world, no, but because we are precious to his Father and nothing that is good will be lost. He therefore tells us not to let fear block us, but rather to fear one other thing, only one. What is the thing Jesus tells us we should fear?

We discover what it is through an image Jesus uses today: the image of “Gehenna” (cf. v. 28). The valley of “Gehenna” was a place the inhabitants of Jerusalem knew well. It was the city’s large garbage dump. Jesus speaks about it in order to say that the true fear we should have, is that of throwing away one’s own life. Jesus says, “Yes, be afraid of that”. It was like saying: you do not need so much to be afraid of suffering misunderstanding and criticism, of losing prestige and economic advantages to remain faithful to the Gospel, no, but of wasting your existence in the pursuit of trivial things that do not fill life with meaning.

This is important for us today. Even today, in fact, some are ridiculed or discriminated against for not following certain fads, which, however, place second-rate realities at the centre – for example, to follow after things instead of people, achievement instead of relationships. Let us give an example: I am thinking of some parents who need to work to maintain their family, but who cannot live for work alone – they need enough time to be with their children. I am also thinking of a priest or a sister who need to dedicate themselves to their service, without, however, forgetting to dedicate time to be with Jesus, otherwise, they will fall into spiritual worldliness and lose the sense of who they are. And again, I am thinking of a young man or woman who have thousands of commitments and passions – school, sports, various interests, cell phones and social networks – but who need to meet people and achieve great dreams, without losing time on passing things that do not leave their mark.

All of this, brothers and sisters, requires some renunciation regarding the idols of efficiency and consumerism. But this is necessary so as not to get lost in things that end up getting thrown out, as they threw things out in Gehenna back then. And people often end up in today’s Gehenna’s, instead. Let’s think, of the least who are often treated like waste products and unwanted objects. There is a cost to remain faithful to what counts. The cost is going against the tide, the cost is freeing oneself from being conditioned by popular opinion, the cost is being separated from those who “follow the current”. But it does not matter, Jesus says. What matters is not to throw away the greatest good: life. This is the only thing that should frighten us.
(Antipope Francis.. June 25, 2023)

…Perhaps we should be grateful that Bergoglio didn’t turn Christ’s warning about Gehenna into a sermon about the importance of recycling!

Francis… tries to get his hearers’ thoughts away from the supernatural and ..focused on [earthly] life

In today’s Gospel, Jesus repeats to his disciples three different times: “have no fear” (Mt 10:26, 28, 31). Shortly prior to this, he had spoken to them about the persecutions they would have to undergo for the Gospel, a fact that is still a reality. Since its beginning, in fact, the Church has experienced, together with joys – of which she has had many – many persecutions. It seems paradoxical: the proclamation of the Kingdom of God is a message of peace and justice, founded on fraternal charity and on forgiveness; and yet it meets with opposition, violence, persecution. Jesus, however, says not to fear, not because everything will be all right in the world, no, but because we are precious to his Father and nothing that is good will be lost. He therefore tells us not to let fear block us, but rather to fear one other thing, only one. What is the thing Jesus tells us we should fear?

… Certainly, peace, justice, charity, and forgiveness are part of the Gospel, but it cannot be reduced to that. The Good News of Jesus Christ is not the Kiwanis club with prayer.

If Francis actually taught the… full Gospel… he would see.. quickly why it meets with opposition from the world.

Christ was hated because, unlike Bergoglio, He did not preach a ‘hippie’ gospel. Rather, His preaching convicted the world of sin (cf. Jn 3:19; 16:8) and demanded the strictest standards of morality. For example, not only did Jesus condemn the external act of murder, but even uncharitable speech and hateful thoughts (see Mt 5:21-22); not only did He condemn the external act of adultery, as did the Jews as well, He made clear that even the least deliberately-willed impure thought was already an infraction of the divine law, and that it would be better to suffer any temporal sacrifice rather than commit mortal sin (see Mt 5:27-30). He sanctified matrimony by raising it to a grace-giving sacrament and restoring to it its original indissolubility (see Mt 5:31-32).

Christ preached the way of the Cross. He demanded not a merely external sanctity but one that consists in a true and inward renewal (rebirth) of the whole person (see Mt 5:20; Jn 3:5-6). He condemned vengeance… (see Mt 5:38-39). He demanded that we conform our lives to His (see Mt 11:29), exhorted all who can take it to perfect chastity (see Mt 19:11-12), and demanded that we love our neighbor as we love our very own selves (see Mk 12:31), even our enemies (see Mt 5:43-47). .

..He demanded that God be loved first and above all things (see Mk 12:29-30), including one’s family, relations, friends, and even life itself:

Do not think that I came to send peace upon earth: I came not to send peace, but the sword. For I came to set a man at variance against his father, and the daughter against her mother, and the daughter in law against her mother in law. And a man’s enemies shall be they of his own household. He that loveth father or mother more than me, is not worthy of me; and he that loveth son or daughter more than me, is not worthy of me. And he that taketh not up his cross, and followeth me, is not worthy of me. He that findeth his life, shall lose it: and he that shall lose his life for me, shall find it. (Matthew 10:34-39)

That is not the gospel preached by Bergoglio. No wonder the fake pope can’t figure out why anyone would oppose the Gospel! The true Gospel is not popular, not attractive to fallen man because it convicts him of sin and demands that he amend his ways under pain of eternal damnation. It requires self-denial, obedience to ecclesiastical authority, and sometimes even heroic sacrifices to save one’s soul: “…the kingdom of heaven suffereth violence, and the violent bear it away” (Mt 11:12).

“Gehenna” is used by our Lord as a metaphor for hell. The Catholic Encyclopedia explains:

…in the New Testament the term Gehenna is used more frequently in preference to hades, as a name for the place of punishment of the damned. Gehenna is the Hebrew gê-hinnom (Nehemiah 11:30), or the longer form gê-ben-hinnom (Joshua 15:8), and gê-benê-hinnom (2 Kings 23:10) “valley of the sons of Hinnom”. Hinnom seems to be the name of a person not otherwise known. The Valley of Hinnom is south of Jerusalem and is now called Wadi er-rababi. It was notorious as the scene, in earlier days, of the horrible worship of Moloch. For this reason it was defiled by Josias (2 Kings 23:10), cursed by Jeremias (Jeremiah 7:31-33), and held in abomination by the Jews, who, accordingly, used the name of this valley to designate the abode of the damned (Targ. Jon., Gen., iii, 24; Henoch, c. xxvi). And Christ adopted this usage of the term. (The Catholic Encyclopedia, s.v. “Hell”)

Interestingly enough, even Bergoglio’s own so-called Catechism of the Catholic Church notes:

Jesus often speaks of “Gehenna,” of “the unquenchable fire” reserved for those who to the end of their lives refuse to believe and be converted, where both soul and body can be lost. Jesus solemnly proclaims that he “will send his angels, and they will gather . . . all evil doers, and throw them into the furnace of fire,” and that he will pronounce the condemnation: “Depart from me, you cursed, into the eternal fire!” (Catechism of the Catholic Church, n. 1034)

So, when Francis says that Christ speaks about Gehenna “in order to say that the true fear we should have, is that of throwing away one’s own life”, that is inaccurate — He specifically warns against throwing one’s soul away, and He distinguishes it clearly from the life of the body. Notice how the false pope omits this crucial distinction and instead conflates both into “life”, hoping no one will notice.

Why Francis does this becomes apparent when we look at what he says immediately after, namely: “It was like saying: you do not need so much to be afraid of suffering misunderstanding and criticism, of losing prestige and economic advantages to remain faithful to the Gospel, no, but of wasting your existence in the pursuit of trivial things that do not fill life with meaning.”

Now it is clear: Bergoglio had to erase Christ’s contrast between the life of the body and the life of the soul in order to be able to make the divine warning about throwing your soul away (namely, into hell) into something about not “wasting your existence in the pursuit of trivial things that do not fill life with meaning”. Obviously, that is not what Christ said… Nor does life have to be “filled” with meaning, as if the meaning of our existence were something to be produced by us and not found in God and the Beatific Vision to which He has called us. But then those are supernatural things, and Francis wants to steer souls away from the supernatural and keep them focused on the things of the earth, lest they be saved: “He that is of the earth, of the earth he is, and of the earth he speaketh” (Jn 3:31).

The whole point of Christ’s warning in the Gospel passage is that one can spend one’s entire life doing non-trivial things — things that are good, legitimate, and important in themselves — and still go to hell! For example, a surgeon who saves lives every day for thirty years, or a social worker who frequently feeds the hungry, or an architect who designs the most magnificent cathedrals, all these people are doing good things but if they do not die in the state of sanctifying grace, they will merit only eternal damnation — not for the good things they did, of course, but for their mortal sins, which can only be blotted out with sanctifying grace, which cannot be “purchased” with naturally good works. Denial of this would constitute the heresy of Pelagianism — salvation by works without grace.

Francis:

... Even today, in fact, some are ridiculed or discriminated against for not following certain fads, which, however, place second-rate realities at the centre – for example, to follow after things instead of people, achievement instead of relationships. Let us give an example: I am thinking of some parents who need to work to maintain their family, but who cannot live for work alone – they need enough time to be with their children. I am also thinking of a priest or a sister who need to dedicate themselves to their service, without, however, forgetting to dedicate time to be with Jesus, otherwise, they will fall into spiritual worldliness and lose the sense of who they are. And again, I am thinking of a young man or woman who have thousands of commitments and passions – school, sports, various interests, cell phones and social networks – but who need to meet people and achieve great dreams, without losing time on passing things that do not leave their mark.

So here Francis simply doubles down on his distortion of the holy words of our Lord. One can follow after “people” and “relationships” instead of things and achievements all one’s life long — but if one dies in the state of mortal sin, everything will be lost… Francis is diverting people’s attention from the actual words of Christ to a fanciful reading that is compatible with his own [narrative].

The false pope is bluntly taking Christ’s exhortation not to lose one’s eternal life for the sake of one’s temporal life and twisting it into a Naturalist message of not to spend one’s temporal life on the trivial but rather on the meaningful. That is not what Christ said, nor is it what He meant! And Bergoglio knows it, obviously. All temporal life will end at death, “and after this the judgment” (Heb 9:27). If the soul is in the state of mortal sin, hell will be its eternal destiny. But that is a pesky little detail Bergoglio is bending over backwards to conceal from those who are unhappily seeking instruction from his blasphemous mouth.

Francis denounces figurative “idols”… (not so much literal idols):

All of this, brothers and sisters, requires some renunciation regarding the idols of efficiency and consumerism. But this is necessary so as not to get lost in things that end up getting thrown out, as they threw things out in Gehenna back then. And people often end up in today’s Gehenna’s, instead. Let’s think, of the least who are often treated like waste products and unwanted objects. There is a cost to remain faithful to what counts. The cost is going against the tide, the cost is freeing oneself from being conditioned by popular opinion, the cost is being separated from those who “follow the current”. But it does not matter, Jesus says. What matters is not to throw away the greatest good: life. This is the only thing that should frighten us.

So here the pseudo-papal shyster desperately tries to introduce one of his favorite talking points, which hinges on Gehenna having been a garbage dump. He then blatantly lies again by claiming that Christ’s teaching is: “What matters is not to throw away the greatest good: life.” No, this earthly life is not the greatest good, eternal life in Heaven is:

And calling the multitude together with his disciples, he said to them: If any man will follow me, let him deny himself, and take up his cross, and follow me. For whosoever will save his life, shall lose it: and whosoever shall lose his life for my sake and the gospel, shall save it. For what shall it profit a man, if he gain the whole world, and suffer the loss of his soul. Or what shall a man give in exchange for his soul? For he that shall be ashamed of me, and of my words, in this adulterous and sinful generation: the Son of man also will be ashamed of him, when he shall come in the glory of his Father with the holy angels. (Mark 8:34-38)

Francis adds insult to injury when in his very last paragraph he warns against “not putting [the] Gospel in first place”:

So let us ask ourselves: I, what do I fear? Not having what I like? Not reaching the goals society imposes? The judgement of others? Or rather of not pleasing the Lord, and not putting his Gospel in first place? Mary, ever Virgin, Mother most Wise, help us to be wise and courageous in the choices we make.

This false pope is a master deceiver, and he is audacious in his deception, for he denies the Gospel straight to your face and then exhorts you never to deny the Gospel. Bergoglio preaches “a charity without faith, very accommodating to unbelievers, which unfortunately opens the way to eternal ruin for all”, as Pope St. Pius X warned in his allocution of Apr. 17, 1907.

‘Pope’ Francis, Apostle of Hell

As we have seen, the true Gospel is supernatural; it is concerned first and foremost with eternal salvation, without which all is lost forever. The Gospel is not a sentimental collection of platitudes about human dignity, tolerance, unconditional acceptance and forgiveness, caresses and tenderness, or helping the needy. It is also not about dreaming, welcoming, including, accompanying, or affirming everyone and everything. That is Bergoglio’s false Naturalist gospel of man, not the true supernatural Gospel of Jesus Christ.

Christ became incarnate so we would be freed from the bondage of sin and be able to go to Heaven. He preached the truth about the fallen human condition and the divinely-given remedy, offering Himself as the Divine-Human Sacrifice to atone for our sins and purchase us back from the dominion of the evil one. Christ did not become man in order to preach a generic, interreligious “message of peace and justice, founded on fraternal charity and on forgiveness”.

This past Sunday, it is clear that Francis went out of his way to avoid speaking about eternal damnation; he instead bent over backwards to come up with some other “interpretation” of Christ’s plain words. But why? Who would have an interest in keeping the truth about hell away from souls?

Would it be our dear Lord Jesus, who suffered and died for souls precisely so they would not end up there and who Himself warned of the reality of the danger of hell throughout His earthly ministry? Or would it be Satan, the devil, who wants to see as many souls eternally damned as possible?
None of the above

That is why I only look to Joe Biden for answers. The potato head knows.

1707412031016.png
 
Well, I don't know.. Whom do we consult on this important matter?

Protestants?
Catholics?
Both?

Both faith communities are messed up, as we all know. Where can we find the answer?

Hey, I know.. How about Jesus Christ and His Word? In Mt 25:31 and other psgs, Jesus speaks of ETERNAL damnation aka punishment. So, you'd think that would settle matters. If not, here is a (an admittedly lengthy!) commentary from an ERUDITE theologian

I found this at novusordo.watch.net, not sure who the author is, but again, the Sedevacantist Catholics (that site is Sede) have the Truth on their side vis a vis the Vatican and its corruption/heresies. That's not necessarily a reason to stop going to NO Churches (??)

I copied it to read in full later --though, so far, it seems I could have written a lot of it myself.

(Yours truly bolded certain parts)



Theologian at Novusordowatch
(who uses Christ's Words to refute Francis's)



Francis once again displayed his masterful skills of distorting Sacred Scripture when what it teaches doesn’t jibe with his false gospel of forgiveness without repentance, which, far from demonstrating God’s great mercy for sinners, makes a mockery of the Redemption and only assists souls in going to hell, not to Heaven.

Our Lord, we must recall, pardoned only one of the two thieves crucified with Him, because only one was contrite. In this manner He taught us never to despair of His mercy, but at the same time never to presume on it either. Both despair and presumption are mortal sins — the Catholic medium between the two is the theological virtue of hope.

The Gospel reading for the Novus Ordo Missae (not the traditional missal) last Sunday, June 25, 2023, was Matthew 10:26-33.. We will quote the passage in full, first from the traditional Catholic Douay-Rheims translation, then from the translation used in the official Novus Ordo lectionary of the United States: Matthew 10:26-33 (Douay-Rheims)

Therefore fear them not. For nothing is covered that shall not be revealed: nor hid, that shall not be known. That which I tell you in the dark, speak ye in the light: and that which you hear in the ear, preach ye upon the housetops. And fear ye not them that kill the body, and are not able to kill the soul: but rather fear him that can destroy both soul and body in hell. Are not two sparrows sold for a farthing? and not one of them shall fall on the ground without your Father. But the very hairs of your head are all numbered. Fear not therefore: better are you than many sparrows. Every one therefore that shall confess me before men, I will also confess him before my Father who is in heaven. But he that shall deny me before men, I will also deny him before my Father who is in heaven.

Matthew 10:26-33 (USCCB Lectionary)

Jesus said to the Twelve: “Fear no one. Nothing is concealed that will not be revealed, nor secret that will not be known. What I say to you in the darkness, speak in the light; what you hear whispered, proclaim on the housetops. And do not be afraid of those who kill the body but cannot kill the soul; rather, be afraid of the one who can destroy both soul and body in Gehenna. Are not two sparrows sold for a small coin? Yet not one of them falls to the ground without your Father’s knowledge. Even all the hairs of your head are counted. So do not be afraid; you are worth more than many sparrows. Everyone who acknowledges me before others I will acknowledge before my heavenly Father. But whoever denies me before others, I will deny before my heavenly Father.”

These words of [Jesus] are consoling in that they encourage and edify the soul by pointing out that although eternal damnation is a real and acute danger, nevertheless God will provide all the graces needed for us to win the battle against sin and temptation.. We are not left to our weakness; God will help us..

Our Lord.. warns that he who, not cooperating with the graces given him, will “deny me before men, I will also deny him before my Father who is in Heaven.” That’s a rather exclusionary message, one that clearly doesn’t work for Bergoglio’s new “big tent” synodal church. .

Knowing that we must tread the way of the Cross with Him if we are to persevere in grace (see Lk 9:23), our Lord warns that we must be willing to sacrifice any material good — even physical life itself — if necessary to preserve the state of sanctifying grace, which is the spiritual life of the soul: “And do not be afraid of those who kill the body but cannot kill the soul; rather, be afraid of the one who can destroy both soul and body in Gehenna.” Fr. Cornelius à Lapidé (1567-1637):

Verse 28. “And fear ye not them that kill the body, and are not able to kill the soul: but rather fear him that can destroy both soul and body in hell..” The sense is: Do not, from fear of death with which the persecutors will threaten you, deny My Faith, or cease from the preaching which I have commanded you, or commit any act unworthy of it, for if ye do this, ye will incur both the death of the body and the far worse and longer-lasting death of the soul, even its eternal death in hell, where the damned die an undying death, because they are constantly live [sic] in mortal torments and endure as though in living death and moribund life, according to Isaias 66:24, Their worm shall not die, and their fire shall not be quenched. Truly does S. Chrysostom say (hom. 5 ad pop.), “He who is always afraid of hell will never fall into its flames, for he is continually purified by this fear.”

Verse 33. But he that shall deny me before men, I will also deny him before my Father who is in heaven. Christ adds this, so that whoever is not moved by His magnificent promise, might be daunted by the terrible threat, that just as Christ will acknowledge those who acknowledge Him, so too, He will deny those who deny Him, saying, I never knew you. Depart from me, you that work iniquity! (Matth. 7:23), that is, go to hell, to Lucifer, whom you serve (Matth. 25:12 ff.).

à Lapide: Gospel.. Mt

There is no question that Christ’s doctrine is challenging — Christianity is not for wimps — but it is not difficult to understand. Notice that our Blessed Lord in His great goodness is pleased to present this particular doctrine in the context of His generous assistance of providing the graces necessary to persevere. That is why He can say in another place: “For my yoke is sweet and my burden light” (Mt 11:3). Our Redeemer does not leave us out in the cold, so to speak, with the dreadful prospect of having to give our lives for Him based on our own strength. No, He makes clear that He will sustain us through all trials if only we are faithful to Him. If, however, we fail to cooperate with His graces and deny Him, and if we persist in this frightful state until death, He will then also deny us. We can see, then, how very serious the matter is.

Francis twists Christ’s Words to make them compatible with Naturalism

The Gospel reading of last Sunday is, then, not terribly difficult to make sense of. Francis had a terrific opportunity … to remind people that all is lost if we lose our souls.. that this temporal life is as nothing when compared to eternity. Hell, eternal damnation, is a very real possibility, and we must arm ourselves with prayers, good works, and self-denial..

In today’s Gospel, Jesus repeats to his disciples three different times: “have no fear” (Mt 10:26, 28, 31). Shortly prior to this, he had spoken to them about the persecutions they would have to undergo for the Gospel, a fact that is still a reality. Since its beginning, in fact, the Church has experienced, together with joys – of which she has had many – many persecutions. It seems paradoxical: the proclamation of the Kingdom of God is a message of peace and justice, founded on fraternal charity and on forgiveness; and yet it meets with opposition, violence, persecution. Jesus, however, says not to fear, not because everything will be all right in the world, no, but because we are precious to his Father and nothing that is good will be lost. He therefore tells us not to let fear block us, but rather to fear one other thing, only one. What is the thing Jesus tells us we should fear?

We discover what it is through an image Jesus uses today: the image of “Gehenna” (cf. v. 28). The valley of “Gehenna” was a place the inhabitants of Jerusalem knew well. It was the city’s large garbage dump. Jesus speaks about it in order to say that the true fear we should have, is that of throwing away one’s own life. Jesus says, “Yes, be afraid of that”. It was like saying: you do not need so much to be afraid of suffering misunderstanding and criticism, of losing prestige and economic advantages to remain faithful to the Gospel, no, but of wasting your existence in the pursuit of trivial things that do not fill life with meaning.

This is important for us today. Even today, in fact, some are ridiculed or discriminated against for not following certain fads, which, however, place second-rate realities at the centre – for example, to follow after things instead of people, achievement instead of relationships. Let us give an example: I am thinking of some parents who need to work to maintain their family, but who cannot live for work alone – they need enough time to be with their children. I am also thinking of a priest or a sister who need to dedicate themselves to their service, without, however, forgetting to dedicate time to be with Jesus, otherwise, they will fall into spiritual worldliness and lose the sense of who they are. And again, I am thinking of a young man or woman who have thousands of commitments and passions – school, sports, various interests, cell phones and social networks – but who need to meet people and achieve great dreams, without losing time on passing things that do not leave their mark.

All of this, brothers and sisters, requires some renunciation regarding the idols of efficiency and consumerism. But this is necessary so as not to get lost in things that end up getting thrown out, as they threw things out in Gehenna back then. And people often end up in today’s Gehenna’s, instead. Let’s think, of the least who are often treated like waste products and unwanted objects. There is a cost to remain faithful to what counts. The cost is going against the tide, the cost is freeing oneself from being conditioned by popular opinion, the cost is being separated from those who “follow the current”. But it does not matter, Jesus says. What matters is not to throw away the greatest good: life. This is the only thing that should frighten us.
(Antipope Francis.. June 25, 2023)

…Perhaps we should be grateful that Bergoglio didn’t turn Christ’s warning about Gehenna into a sermon about the importance of recycling!

Francis… tries to get his hearers’ thoughts away from the supernatural and ..focused on [earthly] life

In today’s Gospel, Jesus repeats to his disciples three different times: “have no fear” (Mt 10:26, 28, 31). Shortly prior to this, he had spoken to them about the persecutions they would have to undergo for the Gospel, a fact that is still a reality. Since its beginning, in fact, the Church has experienced, together with joys – of which she has had many – many persecutions. It seems paradoxical: the proclamation of the Kingdom of God is a message of peace and justice, founded on fraternal charity and on forgiveness; and yet it meets with opposition, violence, persecution. Jesus, however, says not to fear, not because everything will be all right in the world, no, but because we are precious to his Father and nothing that is good will be lost. He therefore tells us not to let fear block us, but rather to fear one other thing, only one. What is the thing Jesus tells us we should fear?

… Certainly, peace, justice, charity, and forgiveness are part of the Gospel, but it cannot be reduced to that. The Good News of Jesus Christ is not the Kiwanis club with prayer.

If Francis actually taught the… full Gospel… he would see.. quickly why it meets with opposition from the world.

Christ was hated because, unlike Bergoglio, He did not preach a ‘hippie’ gospel. Rather, His preaching convicted the world of sin (cf. Jn 3:19; 16:8) and demanded the strictest standards of morality. For example, not only did Jesus condemn the external act of murder, but even uncharitable speech and hateful thoughts (see Mt 5:21-22); not only did He condemn the external act of adultery, as did the Jews as well, He made clear that even the least deliberately-willed impure thought was already an infraction of the divine law, and that it would be better to suffer any temporal sacrifice rather than commit mortal sin (see Mt 5:27-30). He sanctified matrimony by raising it to a grace-giving sacrament and restoring to it its original indissolubility (see Mt 5:31-32).

Christ preached the way of the Cross. He demanded not a merely external sanctity but one that consists in a true and inward renewal (rebirth) of the whole person (see Mt 5:20; Jn 3:5-6). He condemned vengeance… (see Mt 5:38-39). He demanded that we conform our lives to His (see Mt 11:29), exhorted all who can take it to perfect chastity (see Mt 19:11-12), and demanded that we love our neighbor as we love our very own selves (see Mk 12:31), even our enemies (see Mt 5:43-47). .

..He demanded that God be loved first and above all things (see Mk 12:29-30), including one’s family, relations, friends, and even life itself:

Do not think that I came to send peace upon earth: I came not to send peace, but the sword. For I came to set a man at variance against his father, and the daughter against her mother, and the daughter in law against her mother in law. And a man’s enemies shall be they of his own household. He that loveth father or mother more than me, is not worthy of me; and he that loveth son or daughter more than me, is not worthy of me. And he that taketh not up his cross, and followeth me, is not worthy of me. He that findeth his life, shall lose it: and he that shall lose his life for me, shall find it. (Matthew 10:34-39)

That is not the gospel preached by Bergoglio. No wonder the fake pope can’t figure out why anyone would oppose the Gospel! The true Gospel is not popular, not attractive to fallen man because it convicts him of sin and demands that he amend his ways under pain of eternal damnation. It requires self-denial, obedience to ecclesiastical authority, and sometimes even heroic sacrifices to save one’s soul: “…the kingdom of heaven suffereth violence, and the violent bear it away” (Mt 11:12).

“Gehenna” is used by our Lord as a metaphor for hell. The Catholic Encyclopedia explains:

…in the New Testament the term Gehenna is used more frequently in preference to hades, as a name for the place of punishment of the damned. Gehenna is the Hebrew gê-hinnom (Nehemiah 11:30), or the longer form gê-ben-hinnom (Joshua 15:8), and gê-benê-hinnom (2 Kings 23:10) “valley of the sons of Hinnom”. Hinnom seems to be the name of a person not otherwise known. The Valley of Hinnom is south of Jerusalem and is now called Wadi er-rababi. It was notorious as the scene, in earlier days, of the horrible worship of Moloch. For this reason it was defiled by Josias (2 Kings 23:10), cursed by Jeremias (Jeremiah 7:31-33), and held in abomination by the Jews, who, accordingly, used the name of this valley to designate the abode of the damned (Targ. Jon., Gen., iii, 24; Henoch, c. xxvi). And Christ adopted this usage of the term. (The Catholic Encyclopedia, s.v. “Hell”)

Interestingly enough, even Bergoglio’s own so-called Catechism of the Catholic Church notes:

Jesus often speaks of “Gehenna,” of “the unquenchable fire” reserved for those who to the end of their lives refuse to believe and be converted, where both soul and body can be lost. Jesus solemnly proclaims that he “will send his angels, and they will gather . . . all evil doers, and throw them into the furnace of fire,” and that he will pronounce the condemnation: “Depart from me, you cursed, into the eternal fire!” (Catechism of the Catholic Church, n. 1034)

So, when Francis says that Christ speaks about Gehenna “in order to say that the true fear we should have, is that of throwing away one’s own life”, that is inaccurate — He specifically warns against throwing one’s soul away, and He distinguishes it clearly from the life of the body. Notice how the false pope omits this crucial distinction and instead conflates both into “life”, hoping no one will notice.

Why Francis does this becomes apparent when we look at what he says immediately after, namely: “It was like saying: you do not need so much to be afraid of suffering misunderstanding and criticism, of losing prestige and economic advantages to remain faithful to the Gospel, no, but of wasting your existence in the pursuit of trivial things that do not fill life with meaning.”

Now it is clear: Bergoglio had to erase Christ’s contrast between the life of the body and the life of the soul in order to be able to make the divine warning about throwing your soul away (namely, into hell) into something about not “wasting your existence in the pursuit of trivial things that do not fill life with meaning”. Obviously, that is not what Christ said… Nor does life have to be “filled” with meaning, as if the meaning of our existence were something to be produced by us and not found in God and the Beatific Vision to which He has called us. But then those are supernatural things, and Francis wants to steer souls away from the supernatural and keep them focused on the things of the earth, lest they be saved: “He that is of the earth, of the earth he is, and of the earth he speaketh” (Jn 3:31).

The whole point of Christ’s warning in the Gospel passage is that one can spend one’s entire life doing non-trivial things — things that are good, legitimate, and important in themselves — and still go to hell! For example, a surgeon who saves lives every day for thirty years, or a social worker who frequently feeds the hungry, or an architect who designs the most magnificent cathedrals, all these people are doing good things but if they do not die in the state of sanctifying grace, they will merit only eternal damnation — not for the good things they did, of course, but for their mortal sins, which can only be blotted out with sanctifying grace, which cannot be “purchased” with naturally good works. Denial of this would constitute the heresy of Pelagianism — salvation by works without grace.

Francis:

... Even today, in fact, some are ridiculed or discriminated against for not following certain fads, which, however, place second-rate realities at the centre – for example, to follow after things instead of people, achievement instead of relationships. Let us give an example: I am thinking of some parents who need to work to maintain their family, but who cannot live for work alone – they need enough time to be with their children. I am also thinking of a priest or a sister who need to dedicate themselves to their service, without, however, forgetting to dedicate time to be with Jesus, otherwise, they will fall into spiritual worldliness and lose the sense of who they are. And again, I am thinking of a young man or woman who have thousands of commitments and passions – school, sports, various interests, cell phones and social networks – but who need to meet people and achieve great dreams, without losing time on passing things that do not leave their mark.

So here Francis simply doubles down on his distortion of the holy words of our Lord. One can follow after “people” and “relationships” instead of things and achievements all one’s life long — but if one dies in the state of mortal sin, everything will be lost… Francis is diverting people’s attention from the actual words of Christ to a fanciful reading that is compatible with his own [narrative].

The false pope is bluntly taking Christ’s exhortation not to lose one’s eternal life for the sake of one’s temporal life and twisting it into a Naturalist message of not to spend one’s temporal life on the trivial but rather on the meaningful. That is not what Christ said, nor is it what He meant! And Bergoglio knows it, obviously. All temporal life will end at death, “and after this the judgment” (Heb 9:27). If the soul is in the state of mortal sin, hell will be its eternal destiny. But that is a pesky little detail Bergoglio is bending over backwards to conceal from those who are unhappily seeking instruction from his blasphemous mouth.

Francis denounces figurative “idols”… (not so much literal idols):

All of this, brothers and sisters, requires some renunciation regarding the idols of efficiency and consumerism. But this is necessary so as not to get lost in things that end up getting thrown out, as they threw things out in Gehenna back then. And people often end up in today’s Gehenna’s, instead. Let’s think, of the least who are often treated like waste products and unwanted objects. There is a cost to remain faithful to what counts. The cost is going against the tide, the cost is freeing oneself from being conditioned by popular opinion, the cost is being separated from those who “follow the current”. But it does not matter, Jesus says. What matters is not to throw away the greatest good: life. This is the only thing that should frighten us.

So here the pseudo-papal shyster desperately tries to introduce one of his favorite talking points, which hinges on Gehenna having been a garbage dump. He then blatantly lies again by claiming that Christ’s teaching is: “What matters is not to throw away the greatest good: life.” No, this earthly life is not the greatest good, eternal life in Heaven is:

And calling the multitude together with his disciples, he said to them: If any man will follow me, let him deny himself, and take up his cross, and follow me. For whosoever will save his life, shall lose it: and whosoever shall lose his life for my sake and the gospel, shall save it. For what shall it profit a man, if he gain the whole world, and suffer the loss of his soul. Or what shall a man give in exchange for his soul? For he that shall be ashamed of me, and of my words, in this adulterous and sinful generation: the Son of man also will be ashamed of him, when he shall come in the glory of his Father with the holy angels. (Mark 8:34-38)

Francis adds insult to injury when in his very last paragraph he warns against “not putting [the] Gospel in first place”:

So let us ask ourselves: I, what do I fear? Not having what I like? Not reaching the goals society imposes? The judgement of others? Or rather of not pleasing the Lord, and not putting his Gospel in first place? Mary, ever Virgin, Mother most Wise, help us to be wise and courageous in the choices we make.

This false pope is a master deceiver, and he is audacious in his deception, for he denies the Gospel straight to your face and then exhorts you never to deny the Gospel. Bergoglio preaches “a charity without faith, very accommodating to unbelievers, which unfortunately opens the way to eternal ruin for all”, as Pope St. Pius X warned in his allocution of Apr. 17, 1907.

‘Pope’ Francis, Apostle of Hell

As we have seen, the true Gospel is supernatural; it is concerned first and foremost with eternal salvation, without which all is lost forever. The Gospel is not a sentimental collection of platitudes about human dignity, tolerance, unconditional acceptance and forgiveness, caresses and tenderness, or helping the needy. It is also not about dreaming, welcoming, including, accompanying, or affirming everyone and everything. That is Bergoglio’s false Naturalist gospel of man, not the true supernatural Gospel of Jesus Christ.

Christ became incarnate so we would be freed from the bondage of sin and be able to go to Heaven. He preached the truth about the fallen human condition and the divinely-given remedy, offering Himself as the Divine-Human Sacrifice to atone for our sins and purchase us back from the dominion of the evil one. Christ did not become man in order to preach a generic, interreligious “message of peace and justice, founded on fraternal charity and on forgiveness”.

This past Sunday, it is clear that Francis went out of his way to avoid speaking about eternal damnation; he instead bent over backwards to come up with some other “interpretation” of Christ’s plain words. But why? Who would have an interest in keeping the truth about hell away from souls?

Would it be our dear Lord Jesus, who suffered and died for souls precisely so they would not end up there and who Himself warned of the reality of the danger of hell throughout His earthly ministry? Or would it be Satan, the devil, who wants to see as many souls eternally damned as possible?
All that can be summed up in one verse to answer your question:
Rev. 20:13 And death and hell were cast into the lake of fire.
 
I have read through that info from novus ordo watch and

well, I noticed it repeats certain sentences, so I am wondering why there was no final editing?

Anyhow, using a difference reference point:

There is the psg in the Bible about the 2nd death. But I am 99% certain that does not in any way indicate that Hell will one day be abolished. Jesus said that those who do not obey Him in charity (Mt 25:31) will go off to "eternal punishment"

I think Eternal means eternal
Punishment means punishment
 
Well, I don't know.. Whom do we consult on this important matter?

Protestants?
Catholics?
Both?

Both faith communities are messed up, as we all know. Where can we find the answer?

Hey, I know.. How about Jesus Christ and His Word? In Mt 25:31 and other psgs, Jesus speaks of ETERNAL damnation aka punishment. So, you'd think that would settle matters. If not, here is a (an admittedly lengthy!) commentary from an ERUDITE theologian

I found this at novusordo.watch.net, not sure who the author is, but again, the Sedevacantist Catholics (that site is Sede) have the Truth on their side vis a vis the Vatican and its corruption/heresies. That's not necessarily a reason to stop going to NO Churches (??)

I copied it to read in full later --though, so far, it seems I could have written a lot of it myself.

(Yours truly bolded certain parts)



Theologian at Novusordowatch
(who uses Christ's Words to refute Francis's)



Francis once again displayed his masterful skills of distorting Sacred Scripture when what it teaches doesn’t jibe with his false gospel of forgiveness without repentance, which, far from demonstrating God’s great mercy for sinners, makes a mockery of the Redemption and only assists souls in going to hell, not to Heaven.

Our Lord, we must recall, pardoned only one of the two thieves crucified with Him, because only one was contrite. In this manner He taught us never to despair of His mercy, but at the same time never to presume on it either. Both despair and presumption are mortal sins — the Catholic medium between the two is the theological virtue of hope.

The Gospel reading for the Novus Ordo Missae (not the traditional missal) last Sunday, June 25, 2023, was Matthew 10:26-33.. We will quote the passage in full, first from the traditional Catholic Douay-Rheims translation, then from the translation used in the official Novus Ordo lectionary of the United States: Matthew 10:26-33 (Douay-Rheims)

Therefore fear them not. For nothing is covered that shall not be revealed: nor hid, that shall not be known. That which I tell you in the dark, speak ye in the light: and that which you hear in the ear, preach ye upon the housetops. And fear ye not them that kill the body, and are not able to kill the soul: but rather fear him that can destroy both soul and body in hell. Are not two sparrows sold for a farthing? and not one of them shall fall on the ground without your Father. But the very hairs of your head are all numbered. Fear not therefore: better are you than many sparrows. Every one therefore that shall confess me before men, I will also confess him before my Father who is in heaven. But he that shall deny me before men, I will also deny him before my Father who is in heaven.

Matthew 10:26-33 (USCCB Lectionary)

Jesus said to the Twelve: “Fear no one. Nothing is concealed that will not be revealed, nor secret that will not be known. What I say to you in the darkness, speak in the light; what you hear whispered, proclaim on the housetops. And do not be afraid of those who kill the body but cannot kill the soul; rather, be afraid of the one who can destroy both soul and body in Gehenna. Are not two sparrows sold for a small coin? Yet not one of them falls to the ground without your Father’s knowledge. Even all the hairs of your head are counted. So do not be afraid; you are worth more than many sparrows. Everyone who acknowledges me before others I will acknowledge before my heavenly Father. But whoever denies me before others, I will deny before my heavenly Father.”

These words of [Jesus] are consoling in that they encourage and edify the soul by pointing out that although eternal damnation is a real and acute danger, nevertheless God will provide all the graces needed for us to win the battle against sin and temptation.. We are not left to our weakness; God will help us..

Our Lord.. warns that he who, not cooperating with the graces given him, will “deny me before men, I will also deny him before my Father who is in Heaven.” That’s a rather exclusionary message, one that clearly doesn’t work for Bergoglio’s new “big tent” synodal church. .

Knowing that we must tread the way of the Cross with Him if we are to persevere in grace (see Lk 9:23), our Lord warns that we must be willing to sacrifice any material good — even physical life itself — if necessary to preserve the state of sanctifying grace, which is the spiritual life of the soul: “And do not be afraid of those who kill the body but cannot kill the soul; rather, be afraid of the one who can destroy both soul and body in Gehenna.” Fr. Cornelius à Lapidé (1567-1637):

Verse 28. “And fear ye not them that kill the body, and are not able to kill the soul: but rather fear him that can destroy both soul and body in hell..” The sense is: Do not, from fear of death with which the persecutors will threaten you, deny My Faith, or cease from the preaching which I have commanded you, or commit any act unworthy of it, for if ye do this, ye will incur both the death of the body and the far worse and longer-lasting death of the soul, even its eternal death in hell, where the damned die an undying death, because they are constantly live [sic] in mortal torments and endure as though in living death and moribund life, according to Isaias 66:24, Their worm shall not die, and their fire shall not be quenched. Truly does S. Chrysostom say (hom. 5 ad pop.), “He who is always afraid of hell will never fall into its flames, for he is continually purified by this fear.”

Verse 33. But he that shall deny me before men, I will also deny him before my Father who is in heaven. Christ adds this, so that whoever is not moved by His magnificent promise, might be daunted by the terrible threat, that just as Christ will acknowledge those who acknowledge Him, so too, He will deny those who deny Him, saying, I never knew you. Depart from me, you that work iniquity! (Matth. 7:23), that is, go to hell, to Lucifer, whom you serve (Matth. 25:12 ff.).

à Lapide: Gospel.. Mt

There is no question that Christ’s doctrine is challenging — Christianity is not for wimps — but it is not difficult to understand. Notice that our Blessed Lord in His great goodness is pleased to present this particular doctrine in the context of His generous assistance of providing the graces necessary to persevere. That is why He can say in another place: “For my yoke is sweet and my burden light” (Mt 11:3). Our Redeemer does not leave us out in the cold, so to speak, with the dreadful prospect of having to give our lives for Him based on our own strength. No, He makes clear that He will sustain us through all trials if only we are faithful to Him. If, however, we fail to cooperate with His graces and deny Him, and if we persist in this frightful state until death, He will then also deny us. We can see, then, how very serious the matter is.

Francis twists Christ’s Words to make them compatible with Naturalism

The Gospel reading of last Sunday is, then, not terribly difficult to make sense of. Francis had a terrific opportunity … to remind people that all is lost if we lose our souls.. that this temporal life is as nothing when compared to eternity. Hell, eternal damnation, is a very real possibility, and we must arm ourselves with prayers, good works, and self-denial..

In today’s Gospel, Jesus repeats to his disciples three different times: “have no fear” (Mt 10:26, 28, 31). Shortly prior to this, he had spoken to them about the persecutions they would have to undergo for the Gospel, a fact that is still a reality. Since its beginning, in fact, the Church has experienced, together with joys – of which she has had many – many persecutions. It seems paradoxical: the proclamation of the Kingdom of God is a message of peace and justice, founded on fraternal charity and on forgiveness; and yet it meets with opposition, violence, persecution. Jesus, however, says not to fear, not because everything will be all right in the world, no, but because we are precious to his Father and nothing that is good will be lost. He therefore tells us not to let fear block us, but rather to fear one other thing, only one. What is the thing Jesus tells us we should fear?

We discover what it is through an image Jesus uses today: the image of “Gehenna” (cf. v. 28). The valley of “Gehenna” was a place the inhabitants of Jerusalem knew well. It was the city’s large garbage dump. Jesus speaks about it in order to say that the true fear we should have, is that of throwing away one’s own life. Jesus says, “Yes, be afraid of that”. It was like saying: you do not need so much to be afraid of suffering misunderstanding and criticism, of losing prestige and economic advantages to remain faithful to the Gospel, no, but of wasting your existence in the pursuit of trivial things that do not fill life with meaning.

This is important for us today. Even today, in fact, some are ridiculed or discriminated against for not following certain fads, which, however, place second-rate realities at the centre – for example, to follow after things instead of people, achievement instead of relationships. Let us give an example: I am thinking of some parents who need to work to maintain their family, but who cannot live for work alone – they need enough time to be with their children. I am also thinking of a priest or a sister who need to dedicate themselves to their service, without, however, forgetting to dedicate time to be with Jesus, otherwise, they will fall into spiritual worldliness and lose the sense of who they are. And again, I am thinking of a young man or woman who have thousands of commitments and passions – school, sports, various interests, cell phones and social networks – but who need to meet people and achieve great dreams, without losing time on passing things that do not leave their mark.

All of this, brothers and sisters, requires some renunciation regarding the idols of efficiency and consumerism. But this is necessary so as not to get lost in things that end up getting thrown out, as they threw things out in Gehenna back then. And people often end up in today’s Gehenna’s, instead. Let’s think, of the least who are often treated like waste products and unwanted objects. There is a cost to remain faithful to what counts. The cost is going against the tide, the cost is freeing oneself from being conditioned by popular opinion, the cost is being separated from those who “follow the current”. But it does not matter, Jesus says. What matters is not to throw away the greatest good: life. This is the only thing that should frighten us.
(Antipope Francis.. June 25, 2023)

…Perhaps we should be grateful that Bergoglio didn’t turn Christ’s warning about Gehenna into a sermon about the importance of recycling!

Francis… tries to get his hearers’ thoughts away from the supernatural and ..focused on [earthly] life

In today’s Gospel, Jesus repeats to his disciples three different times: “have no fear” (Mt 10:26, 28, 31). Shortly prior to this, he had spoken to them about the persecutions they would have to undergo for the Gospel, a fact that is still a reality. Since its beginning, in fact, the Church has experienced, together with joys – of which she has had many – many persecutions. It seems paradoxical: the proclamation of the Kingdom of God is a message of peace and justice, founded on fraternal charity and on forgiveness; and yet it meets with opposition, violence, persecution. Jesus, however, says not to fear, not because everything will be all right in the world, no, but because we are precious to his Father and nothing that is good will be lost. He therefore tells us not to let fear block us, but rather to fear one other thing, only one. What is the thing Jesus tells us we should fear?

… Certainly, peace, justice, charity, and forgiveness are part of the Gospel, but it cannot be reduced to that. The Good News of Jesus Christ is not the Kiwanis club with prayer.

If Francis actually taught the… full Gospel… he would see.. quickly why it meets with opposition from the world.

Christ was hated because, unlike Bergoglio, He did not preach a ‘hippie’ gospel. Rather, His preaching convicted the world of sin (cf. Jn 3:19; 16:8) and demanded the strictest standards of morality. For example, not only did Jesus condemn the external act of murder, but even uncharitable speech and hateful thoughts (see Mt 5:21-22); not only did He condemn the external act of adultery, as did the Jews as well, He made clear that even the least deliberately-willed impure thought was already an infraction of the divine law, and that it would be better to suffer any temporal sacrifice rather than commit mortal sin (see Mt 5:27-30). He sanctified matrimony by raising it to a grace-giving sacrament and restoring to it its original indissolubility (see Mt 5:31-32).

Christ preached the way of the Cross. He demanded not a merely external sanctity but one that consists in a true and inward renewal (rebirth) of the whole person (see Mt 5:20; Jn 3:5-6). He condemned vengeance… (see Mt 5:38-39). He demanded that we conform our lives to His (see Mt 11:29), exhorted all who can take it to perfect chastity (see Mt 19:11-12), and demanded that we love our neighbor as we love our very own selves (see Mk 12:31), even our enemies (see Mt 5:43-47). .

..He demanded that God be loved first and above all things (see Mk 12:29-30), including one’s family, relations, friends, and even life itself:

Do not think that I came to send peace upon earth: I came not to send peace, but the sword. For I came to set a man at variance against his father, and the daughter against her mother, and the daughter in law against her mother in law. And a man’s enemies shall be they of his own household. He that loveth father or mother more than me, is not worthy of me; and he that loveth son or daughter more than me, is not worthy of me. And he that taketh not up his cross, and followeth me, is not worthy of me. He that findeth his life, shall lose it: and he that shall lose his life for me, shall find it. (Matthew 10:34-39)

That is not the gospel preached by Bergoglio. No wonder the fake pope can’t figure out why anyone would oppose the Gospel! The true Gospel is not popular, not attractive to fallen man because it convicts him of sin and demands that he amend his ways under pain of eternal damnation. It requires self-denial, obedience to ecclesiastical authority, and sometimes even heroic sacrifices to save one’s soul: “…the kingdom of heaven suffereth violence, and the violent bear it away” (Mt 11:12).

“Gehenna” is used by our Lord as a metaphor for hell. The Catholic Encyclopedia explains:

…in the New Testament the term Gehenna is used more frequently in preference to hades, as a name for the place of punishment of the damned. Gehenna is the Hebrew gê-hinnom (Nehemiah 11:30), or the longer form gê-ben-hinnom (Joshua 15:8), and gê-benê-hinnom (2 Kings 23:10) “valley of the sons of Hinnom”. Hinnom seems to be the name of a person not otherwise known. The Valley of Hinnom is south of Jerusalem and is now called Wadi er-rababi. It was notorious as the scene, in earlier days, of the horrible worship of Moloch. For this reason it was defiled by Josias (2 Kings 23:10), cursed by Jeremias (Jeremiah 7:31-33), and held in abomination by the Jews, who, accordingly, used the name of this valley to designate the abode of the damned (Targ. Jon., Gen., iii, 24; Henoch, c. xxvi). And Christ adopted this usage of the term. (The Catholic Encyclopedia, s.v. “Hell”)

Interestingly enough, even Bergoglio’s own so-called Catechism of the Catholic Church notes:

Jesus often speaks of “Gehenna,” of “the unquenchable fire” reserved for those who to the end of their lives refuse to believe and be converted, where both soul and body can be lost. Jesus solemnly proclaims that he “will send his angels, and they will gather . . . all evil doers, and throw them into the furnace of fire,” and that he will pronounce the condemnation: “Depart from me, you cursed, into the eternal fire!” (Catechism of the Catholic Church, n. 1034)

So, when Francis says that Christ speaks about Gehenna “in order to say that the true fear we should have, is that of throwing away one’s own life”, that is inaccurate — He specifically warns against throwing one’s soul away, and He distinguishes it clearly from the life of the body. Notice how the false pope omits this crucial distinction and instead conflates both into “life”, hoping no one will notice.

Why Francis does this becomes apparent when we look at what he says immediately after, namely: “It was like saying: you do not need so much to be afraid of suffering misunderstanding and criticism, of losing prestige and economic advantages to remain faithful to the Gospel, no, but of wasting your existence in the pursuit of trivial things that do not fill life with meaning.”

Now it is clear: Bergoglio had to erase Christ’s contrast between the life of the body and the life of the soul in order to be able to make the divine warning about throwing your soul away (namely, into hell) into something about not “wasting your existence in the pursuit of trivial things that do not fill life with meaning”. Obviously, that is not what Christ said… Nor does life have to be “filled” with meaning, as if the meaning of our existence were something to be produced by us and not found in God and the Beatific Vision to which He has called us. But then those are supernatural things, and Francis wants to steer souls away from the supernatural and keep them focused on the things of the earth, lest they be saved: “He that is of the earth, of the earth he is, and of the earth he speaketh” (Jn 3:31).

The whole point of Christ’s warning in the Gospel passage is that one can spend one’s entire life doing non-trivial things — things that are good, legitimate, and important in themselves — and still go to hell! For example, a surgeon who saves lives every day for thirty years, or a social worker who frequently feeds the hungry, or an architect who designs the most magnificent cathedrals, all these people are doing good things but if they do not die in the state of sanctifying grace, they will merit only eternal damnation — not for the good things they did, of course, but for their mortal sins, which can only be blotted out with sanctifying grace, which cannot be “purchased” with naturally good works. Denial of this would constitute the heresy of Pelagianism — salvation by works without grace.

Francis:

... Even today, in fact, some are ridiculed or discriminated against for not following certain fads, which, however, place second-rate realities at the centre – for example, to follow after things instead of people, achievement instead of relationships. Let us give an example: I am thinking of some parents who need to work to maintain their family, but who cannot live for work alone – they need enough time to be with their children. I am also thinking of a priest or a sister who need to dedicate themselves to their service, without, however, forgetting to dedicate time to be with Jesus, otherwise, they will fall into spiritual worldliness and lose the sense of who they are. And again, I am thinking of a young man or woman who have thousands of commitments and passions – school, sports, various interests, cell phones and social networks – but who need to meet people and achieve great dreams, without losing time on passing things that do not leave their mark.

So here Francis simply doubles down on his distortion of the holy words of our Lord. One can follow after “people” and “relationships” instead of things and achievements all one’s life long — but if one dies in the state of mortal sin, everything will be lost… Francis is diverting people’s attention from the actual words of Christ to a fanciful reading that is compatible with his own [narrative].

The false pope is bluntly taking Christ’s exhortation not to lose one’s eternal life for the sake of one’s temporal life and twisting it into a Naturalist message of not to spend one’s temporal life on the trivial but rather on the meaningful. That is not what Christ said, nor is it what He meant! And Bergoglio knows it, obviously. All temporal life will end at death, “and after this the judgment” (Heb 9:27). If the soul is in the state of mortal sin, hell will be its eternal destiny. But that is a pesky little detail Bergoglio is bending over backwards to conceal from those who are unhappily seeking instruction from his blasphemous mouth.

Francis denounces figurative “idols”… (not so much literal idols):

All of this, brothers and sisters, requires some renunciation regarding the idols of efficiency and consumerism. But this is necessary so as not to get lost in things that end up getting thrown out, as they threw things out in Gehenna back then. And people often end up in today’s Gehenna’s, instead. Let’s think, of the least who are often treated like waste products and unwanted objects. There is a cost to remain faithful to what counts. The cost is going against the tide, the cost is freeing oneself from being conditioned by popular opinion, the cost is being separated from those who “follow the current”. But it does not matter, Jesus says. What matters is not to throw away the greatest good: life. This is the only thing that should frighten us.

So here the pseudo-papal shyster desperately tries to introduce one of his favorite talking points, which hinges on Gehenna having been a garbage dump. He then blatantly lies again by claiming that Christ’s teaching is: “What matters is not to throw away the greatest good: life.” No, this earthly life is not the greatest good, eternal life in Heaven is:

And calling the multitude together with his disciples, he said to them: If any man will follow me, let him deny himself, and take up his cross, and follow me. For whosoever will save his life, shall lose it: and whosoever shall lose his life for my sake and the gospel, shall save it. For what shall it profit a man, if he gain the whole world, and suffer the loss of his soul. Or what shall a man give in exchange for his soul? For he that shall be ashamed of me, and of my words, in this adulterous and sinful generation: the Son of man also will be ashamed of him, when he shall come in the glory of his Father with the holy angels. (Mark 8:34-38)

Francis adds insult to injury when in his very last paragraph he warns against “not putting [the] Gospel in first place”:

So let us ask ourselves: I, what do I fear? Not having what I like? Not reaching the goals society imposes? The judgement of others? Or rather of not pleasing the Lord, and not putting his Gospel in first place? Mary, ever Virgin, Mother most Wise, help us to be wise and courageous in the choices we make.

This false pope is a master deceiver, and he is audacious in his deception, for he denies the Gospel straight to your face and then exhorts you never to deny the Gospel. Bergoglio preaches “a charity without faith, very accommodating to unbelievers, which unfortunately opens the way to eternal ruin for all”, as Pope St. Pius X warned in his allocution of Apr. 17, 1907.

‘Pope’ Francis, Apostle of Hell

As we have seen, the true Gospel is supernatural; it is concerned first and foremost with eternal salvation, without which all is lost forever. The Gospel is not a sentimental collection of platitudes about human dignity, tolerance, unconditional acceptance and forgiveness, caresses and tenderness, or helping the needy. It is also not about dreaming, welcoming, including, accompanying, or affirming everyone and everything. That is Bergoglio’s false Naturalist gospel of man, not the true supernatural Gospel of Jesus Christ.

Christ became incarnate so we would be freed from the bondage of sin and be able to go to Heaven. He preached the truth about the fallen human condition and the divinely-given remedy, offering Himself as the Divine-Human Sacrifice to atone for our sins and purchase us back from the dominion of the evil one. Christ did not become man in order to preach a generic, interreligious “message of peace and justice, founded on fraternal charity and on forgiveness”.

This past Sunday, it is clear that Francis went out of his way to avoid speaking about eternal damnation; he instead bent over backwards to come up with some other “interpretation” of Christ’s plain words. But why? Who would have an interest in keeping the truth about hell away from souls?

Would it be our dear Lord Jesus, who suffered and died for souls precisely so they would not end up there and who Himself warned of the reality of the danger of hell throughout His earthly ministry? Or would it be Satan, the devil, who wants to see as many souls eternally damned as possible?
Another long and boring rant that no one is going to read. Why do you do this?
Your first error is to say protestants and catholics don't get to read and interpret the bible. Only you get to do this. That's your first mistake. The question I'll ask you, define Hell and what it is? If you can't answer this, then you have no standing on this debate.
 
Well, I don't know.. Whom do we consult on this important matter?

Protestants?
Catholics?
Both?

Both faith communities are messed up, as we all know. Where can we find the answer?

Hey, I know.. How about Jesus Christ and His Word? In Mt 25:31 and other psgs, Jesus speaks of ETERNAL damnation aka punishment. So, you'd think that would settle matters. If not, here is a (an admittedly lengthy!) commentary from an ERUDITE theologian

I found this at novusordo.watch.net, not sure who the author is, but again, the Sedevacantist Catholics (that site is Sede) have the Truth on their side vis a vis the Vatican and its corruption/heresies. That's not necessarily a reason to stop going to NO Churches (??)

I copied it to read in full later --though, so far, it seems I could have written a lot of it myself.

(Yours truly bolded certain parts)



Theologian at Novusordowatch
(who uses Christ's Words to refute Francis's)



Francis once again displayed his masterful skills of distorting Sacred Scripture when what it teaches doesn’t jibe with his false gospel of forgiveness without repentance, which, far from demonstrating God’s great mercy for sinners, makes a mockery of the Redemption and only assists souls in going to hell, not to Heaven.

Our Lord, we must recall, pardoned only one of the two thieves crucified with Him, because only one was contrite. In this manner He taught us never to despair of His mercy, but at the same time never to presume on it either. Both despair and presumption are mortal sins — the Catholic medium between the two is the theological virtue of hope.

The Gospel reading for the Novus Ordo Missae (not the traditional missal) last Sunday, June 25, 2023, was Matthew 10:26-33.. We will quote the passage in full, first from the traditional Catholic Douay-Rheims translation, then from the translation used in the official Novus Ordo lectionary of the United States: Matthew 10:26-33 (Douay-Rheims)

Therefore fear them not. For nothing is covered that shall not be revealed: nor hid, that shall not be known. That which I tell you in the dark, speak ye in the light: and that which you hear in the ear, preach ye upon the housetops. And fear ye not them that kill the body, and are not able to kill the soul: but rather fear him that can destroy both soul and body in hell. Are not two sparrows sold for a farthing? and not one of them shall fall on the ground without your Father. But the very hairs of your head are all numbered. Fear not therefore: better are you than many sparrows. Every one therefore that shall confess me before men, I will also confess him before my Father who is in heaven. But he that shall deny me before men, I will also deny him before my Father who is in heaven.

Matthew 10:26-33 (USCCB Lectionary)

Jesus said to the Twelve: “Fear no one. Nothing is concealed that will not be revealed, nor secret that will not be known. What I say to you in the darkness, speak in the light; what you hear whispered, proclaim on the housetops. And do not be afraid of those who kill the body but cannot kill the soul; rather, be afraid of the one who can destroy both soul and body in Gehenna. Are not two sparrows sold for a small coin? Yet not one of them falls to the ground without your Father’s knowledge. Even all the hairs of your head are counted. So do not be afraid; you are worth more than many sparrows. Everyone who acknowledges me before others I will acknowledge before my heavenly Father. But whoever denies me before others, I will deny before my heavenly Father.”

These words of [Jesus] are consoling in that they encourage and edify the soul by pointing out that although eternal damnation is a real and acute danger, nevertheless God will provide all the graces needed for us to win the battle against sin and temptation.. We are not left to our weakness; God will help us..

Our Lord.. warns that he who, not cooperating with the graces given him, will “deny me before men, I will also deny him before my Father who is in Heaven.” That’s a rather exclusionary message, one that clearly doesn’t work for Bergoglio’s new “big tent” synodal church. .

Knowing that we must tread the way of the Cross with Him if we are to persevere in grace (see Lk 9:23), our Lord warns that we must be willing to sacrifice any material good — even physical life itself — if necessary to preserve the state of sanctifying grace, which is the spiritual life of the soul: “And do not be afraid of those who kill the body but cannot kill the soul; rather, be afraid of the one who can destroy both soul and body in Gehenna.” Fr. Cornelius à Lapidé (1567-1637):

Verse 28. “And fear ye not them that kill the body, and are not able to kill the soul: but rather fear him that can destroy both soul and body in hell..” The sense is: Do not, from fear of death with which the persecutors will threaten you, deny My Faith, or cease from the preaching which I have commanded you, or commit any act unworthy of it, for if ye do this, ye will incur both the death of the body and the far worse and longer-lasting death of the soul, even its eternal death in hell, where the damned die an undying death, because they are constantly live [sic] in mortal torments and endure as though in living death and moribund life, according to Isaias 66:24, Their worm shall not die, and their fire shall not be quenched. Truly does S. Chrysostom say (hom. 5 ad pop.), “He who is always afraid of hell will never fall into its flames, for he is continually purified by this fear.”

Verse 33. But he that shall deny me before men, I will also deny him before my Father who is in heaven. Christ adds this, so that whoever is not moved by His magnificent promise, might be daunted by the terrible threat, that just as Christ will acknowledge those who acknowledge Him, so too, He will deny those who deny Him, saying, I never knew you. Depart from me, you that work iniquity! (Matth. 7:23), that is, go to hell, to Lucifer, whom you serve (Matth. 25:12 ff.).

à Lapide: Gospel.. Mt

There is no question that Christ’s doctrine is challenging — Christianity is not for wimps — but it is not difficult to understand. Notice that our Blessed Lord in His great goodness is pleased to present this particular doctrine in the context of His generous assistance of providing the graces necessary to persevere. That is why He can say in another place: “For my yoke is sweet and my burden light” (Mt 11:3). Our Redeemer does not leave us out in the cold, so to speak, with the dreadful prospect of having to give our lives for Him based on our own strength. No, He makes clear that He will sustain us through all trials if only we are faithful to Him. If, however, we fail to cooperate with His graces and deny Him, and if we persist in this frightful state until death, He will then also deny us. We can see, then, how very serious the matter is.

Francis twists Christ’s Words to make them compatible with Naturalism

The Gospel reading of last Sunday is, then, not terribly difficult to make sense of. Francis had a terrific opportunity … to remind people that all is lost if we lose our souls.. that this temporal life is as nothing when compared to eternity. Hell, eternal damnation, is a very real possibility, and we must arm ourselves with prayers, good works, and self-denial..

In today’s Gospel, Jesus repeats to his disciples three different times: “have no fear” (Mt 10:26, 28, 31). Shortly prior to this, he had spoken to them about the persecutions they would have to undergo for the Gospel, a fact that is still a reality. Since its beginning, in fact, the Church has experienced, together with joys – of which she has had many – many persecutions. It seems paradoxical: the proclamation of the Kingdom of God is a message of peace and justice, founded on fraternal charity and on forgiveness; and yet it meets with opposition, violence, persecution. Jesus, however, says not to fear, not because everything will be all right in the world, no, but because we are precious to his Father and nothing that is good will be lost. He therefore tells us not to let fear block us, but rather to fear one other thing, only one. What is the thing Jesus tells us we should fear?

We discover what it is through an image Jesus uses today: the image of “Gehenna” (cf. v. 28). The valley of “Gehenna” was a place the inhabitants of Jerusalem knew well. It was the city’s large garbage dump. Jesus speaks about it in order to say that the true fear we should have, is that of throwing away one’s own life. Jesus says, “Yes, be afraid of that”. It was like saying: you do not need so much to be afraid of suffering misunderstanding and criticism, of losing prestige and economic advantages to remain faithful to the Gospel, no, but of wasting your existence in the pursuit of trivial things that do not fill life with meaning.

This is important for us today. Even today, in fact, some are ridiculed or discriminated against for not following certain fads, which, however, place second-rate realities at the centre – for example, to follow after things instead of people, achievement instead of relationships. Let us give an example: I am thinking of some parents who need to work to maintain their family, but who cannot live for work alone – they need enough time to be with their children. I am also thinking of a priest or a sister who need to dedicate themselves to their service, without, however, forgetting to dedicate time to be with Jesus, otherwise, they will fall into spiritual worldliness and lose the sense of who they are. And again, I am thinking of a young man or woman who have thousands of commitments and passions – school, sports, various interests, cell phones and social networks – but who need to meet people and achieve great dreams, without losing time on passing things that do not leave their mark.

All of this, brothers and sisters, requires some renunciation regarding the idols of efficiency and consumerism. But this is necessary so as not to get lost in things that end up getting thrown out, as they threw things out in Gehenna back then. And people often end up in today’s Gehenna’s, instead. Let’s think, of the least who are often treated like waste products and unwanted objects. There is a cost to remain faithful to what counts. The cost is going against the tide, the cost is freeing oneself from being conditioned by popular opinion, the cost is being separated from those who “follow the current”. But it does not matter, Jesus says. What matters is not to throw away the greatest good: life. This is the only thing that should frighten us.
(Antipope Francis.. June 25, 2023)

…Perhaps we should be grateful that Bergoglio didn’t turn Christ’s warning about Gehenna into a sermon about the importance of recycling!

Francis… tries to get his hearers’ thoughts away from the supernatural and ..focused on [earthly] life

In today’s Gospel, Jesus repeats to his disciples three different times: “have no fear” (Mt 10:26, 28, 31). Shortly prior to this, he had spoken to them about the persecutions they would have to undergo for the Gospel, a fact that is still a reality. Since its beginning, in fact, the Church has experienced, together with joys – of which she has had many – many persecutions. It seems paradoxical: the proclamation of the Kingdom of God is a message of peace and justice, founded on fraternal charity and on forgiveness; and yet it meets with opposition, violence, persecution. Jesus, however, says not to fear, not because everything will be all right in the world, no, but because we are precious to his Father and nothing that is good will be lost. He therefore tells us not to let fear block us, but rather to fear one other thing, only one. What is the thing Jesus tells us we should fear?

… Certainly, peace, justice, charity, and forgiveness are part of the Gospel, but it cannot be reduced to that. The Good News of Jesus Christ is not the Kiwanis club with prayer.

If Francis actually taught the… full Gospel… he would see.. quickly why it meets with opposition from the world.

Christ was hated because, unlike Bergoglio, He did not preach a ‘hippie’ gospel. Rather, His preaching convicted the world of sin (cf. Jn 3:19; 16:8) and demanded the strictest standards of morality. For example, not only did Jesus condemn the external act of murder, but even uncharitable speech and hateful thoughts (see Mt 5:21-22); not only did He condemn the external act of adultery, as did the Jews as well, He made clear that even the least deliberately-willed impure thought was already an infraction of the divine law, and that it would be better to suffer any temporal sacrifice rather than commit mortal sin (see Mt 5:27-30). He sanctified matrimony by raising it to a grace-giving sacrament and restoring to it its original indissolubility (see Mt 5:31-32).

Christ preached the way of the Cross. He demanded not a merely external sanctity but one that consists in a true and inward renewal (rebirth) of the whole person (see Mt 5:20; Jn 3:5-6). He condemned vengeance… (see Mt 5:38-39). He demanded that we conform our lives to His (see Mt 11:29), exhorted all who can take it to perfect chastity (see Mt 19:11-12), and demanded that we love our neighbor as we love our very own selves (see Mk 12:31), even our enemies (see Mt 5:43-47). .

..He demanded that God be loved first and above all things (see Mk 12:29-30), including one’s family, relations, friends, and even life itself:

Do not think that I came to send peace upon earth: I came not to send peace, but the sword. For I came to set a man at variance against his father, and the daughter against her mother, and the daughter in law against her mother in law. And a man’s enemies shall be they of his own household. He that loveth father or mother more than me, is not worthy of me; and he that loveth son or daughter more than me, is not worthy of me. And he that taketh not up his cross, and followeth me, is not worthy of me. He that findeth his life, shall lose it: and he that shall lose his life for me, shall find it. (Matthew 10:34-39)

That is not the gospel preached by Bergoglio. No wonder the fake pope can’t figure out why anyone would oppose the Gospel! The true Gospel is not popular, not attractive to fallen man because it convicts him of sin and demands that he amend his ways under pain of eternal damnation. It requires self-denial, obedience to ecclesiastical authority, and sometimes even heroic sacrifices to save one’s soul: “…the kingdom of heaven suffereth violence, and the violent bear it away” (Mt 11:12).

“Gehenna” is used by our Lord as a metaphor for hell. The Catholic Encyclopedia explains:

…in the New Testament the term Gehenna is used more frequently in preference to hades, as a name for the place of punishment of the damned. Gehenna is the Hebrew gê-hinnom (Nehemiah 11:30), or the longer form gê-ben-hinnom (Joshua 15:8), and gê-benê-hinnom (2 Kings 23:10) “valley of the sons of Hinnom”. Hinnom seems to be the name of a person not otherwise known. The Valley of Hinnom is south of Jerusalem and is now called Wadi er-rababi. It was notorious as the scene, in earlier days, of the horrible worship of Moloch. For this reason it was defiled by Josias (2 Kings 23:10), cursed by Jeremias (Jeremiah 7:31-33), and held in abomination by the Jews, who, accordingly, used the name of this valley to designate the abode of the damned (Targ. Jon., Gen., iii, 24; Henoch, c. xxvi). And Christ adopted this usage of the term. (The Catholic Encyclopedia, s.v. “Hell”)

Interestingly enough, even Bergoglio’s own so-called Catechism of the Catholic Church notes:

Jesus often speaks of “Gehenna,” of “the unquenchable fire” reserved for those who to the end of their lives refuse to believe and be converted, where both soul and body can be lost. Jesus solemnly proclaims that he “will send his angels, and they will gather . . . all evil doers, and throw them into the furnace of fire,” and that he will pronounce the condemnation: “Depart from me, you cursed, into the eternal fire!” (Catechism of the Catholic Church, n. 1034)

So, when Francis says that Christ speaks about Gehenna “in order to say that the true fear we should have, is that of throwing away one’s own life”, that is inaccurate — He specifically warns against throwing one’s soul away, and He distinguishes it clearly from the life of the body. Notice how the false pope omits this crucial distinction and instead conflates both into “life”, hoping no one will notice.

Why Francis does this becomes apparent when we look at what he says immediately after, namely: “It was like saying: you do not need so much to be afraid of suffering misunderstanding and criticism, of losing prestige and economic advantages to remain faithful to the Gospel, no, but of wasting your existence in the pursuit of trivial things that do not fill life with meaning.”

Now it is clear: Bergoglio had to erase Christ’s contrast between the life of the body and the life of the soul in order to be able to make the divine warning about throwing your soul away (namely, into hell) into something about not “wasting your existence in the pursuit of trivial things that do not fill life with meaning”. Obviously, that is not what Christ said… Nor does life have to be “filled” with meaning, as if the meaning of our existence were something to be produced by us and not found in God and the Beatific Vision to which He has called us. But then those are supernatural things, and Francis wants to steer souls away from the supernatural and keep them focused on the things of the earth, lest they be saved: “He that is of the earth, of the earth he is, and of the earth he speaketh” (Jn 3:31).

The whole point of Christ’s warning in the Gospel passage is that one can spend one’s entire life doing non-trivial things — things that are good, legitimate, and important in themselves — and still go to hell! For example, a surgeon who saves lives every day for thirty years, or a social worker who frequently feeds the hungry, or an architect who designs the most magnificent cathedrals, all these people are doing good things but if they do not die in the state of sanctifying grace, they will merit only eternal damnation — not for the good things they did, of course, but for their mortal sins, which can only be blotted out with sanctifying grace, which cannot be “purchased” with naturally good works. Denial of this would constitute the heresy of Pelagianism — salvation by works without grace.

Francis:

... Even today, in fact, some are ridiculed or discriminated against for not following certain fads, which, however, place second-rate realities at the centre – for example, to follow after things instead of people, achievement instead of relationships. Let us give an example: I am thinking of some parents who need to work to maintain their family, but who cannot live for work alone – they need enough time to be with their children. I am also thinking of a priest or a sister who need to dedicate themselves to their service, without, however, forgetting to dedicate time to be with Jesus, otherwise, they will fall into spiritual worldliness and lose the sense of who they are. And again, I am thinking of a young man or woman who have thousands of commitments and passions – school, sports, various interests, cell phones and social networks – but who need to meet people and achieve great dreams, without losing time on passing things that do not leave their mark.

So here Francis simply doubles down on his distortion of the holy words of our Lord. One can follow after “people” and “relationships” instead of things and achievements all one’s life long — but if one dies in the state of mortal sin, everything will be lost… Francis is diverting people’s attention from the actual words of Christ to a fanciful reading that is compatible with his own [narrative].

The false pope is bluntly taking Christ’s exhortation not to lose one’s eternal life for the sake of one’s temporal life and twisting it into a Naturalist message of not to spend one’s temporal life on the trivial but rather on the meaningful. That is not what Christ said, nor is it what He meant! And Bergoglio knows it, obviously. All temporal life will end at death, “and after this the judgment” (Heb 9:27). If the soul is in the state of mortal sin, hell will be its eternal destiny. But that is a pesky little detail Bergoglio is bending over backwards to conceal from those who are unhappily seeking instruction from his blasphemous mouth.

Francis denounces figurative “idols”… (not so much literal idols):

All of this, brothers and sisters, requires some renunciation regarding the idols of efficiency and consumerism. But this is necessary so as not to get lost in things that end up getting thrown out, as they threw things out in Gehenna back then. And people often end up in today’s Gehenna’s, instead. Let’s think, of the least who are often treated like waste products and unwanted objects. There is a cost to remain faithful to what counts. The cost is going against the tide, the cost is freeing oneself from being conditioned by popular opinion, the cost is being separated from those who “follow the current”. But it does not matter, Jesus says. What matters is not to throw away the greatest good: life. This is the only thing that should frighten us.

So here the pseudo-papal shyster desperately tries to introduce one of his favorite talking points, which hinges on Gehenna having been a garbage dump. He then blatantly lies again by claiming that Christ’s teaching is: “What matters is not to throw away the greatest good: life.” No, this earthly life is not the greatest good, eternal life in Heaven is:

And calling the multitude together with his disciples, he said to them: If any man will follow me, let him deny himself, and take up his cross, and follow me. For whosoever will save his life, shall lose it: and whosoever shall lose his life for my sake and the gospel, shall save it. For what shall it profit a man, if he gain the whole world, and suffer the loss of his soul. Or what shall a man give in exchange for his soul? For he that shall be ashamed of me, and of my words, in this adulterous and sinful generation: the Son of man also will be ashamed of him, when he shall come in the glory of his Father with the holy angels. (Mark 8:34-38)

Francis adds insult to injury when in his very last paragraph he warns against “not putting [the] Gospel in first place”:

So let us ask ourselves: I, what do I fear? Not having what I like? Not reaching the goals society imposes? The judgement of others? Or rather of not pleasing the Lord, and not putting his Gospel in first place? Mary, ever Virgin, Mother most Wise, help us to be wise and courageous in the choices we make.

This false pope is a master deceiver, and he is audacious in his deception, for he denies the Gospel straight to your face and then exhorts you never to deny the Gospel. Bergoglio preaches “a charity without faith, very accommodating to unbelievers, which unfortunately opens the way to eternal ruin for all”, as Pope St. Pius X warned in his allocution of Apr. 17, 1907.

‘Pope’ Francis, Apostle of Hell

As we have seen, the true Gospel is supernatural; it is concerned first and foremost with eternal salvation, without which all is lost forever. The Gospel is not a sentimental collection of platitudes about human dignity, tolerance, unconditional acceptance and forgiveness, caresses and tenderness, or helping the needy. It is also not about dreaming, welcoming, including, accompanying, or affirming everyone and everything. That is Bergoglio’s false Naturalist gospel of man, not the true supernatural Gospel of Jesus Christ.

Christ became incarnate so we would be freed from the bondage of sin and be able to go to Heaven. He preached the truth about the fallen human condition and the divinely-given remedy, offering Himself as the Divine-Human Sacrifice to atone for our sins and purchase us back from the dominion of the evil one. Christ did not become man in order to preach a generic, interreligious “message of peace and justice, founded on fraternal charity and on forgiveness”.

This past Sunday, it is clear that Francis went out of his way to avoid speaking about eternal damnation; he instead bent over backwards to come up with some other “interpretation” of Christ’s plain words. But why? Who would have an interest in keeping the truth about hell away from souls?

Would it be our dear Lord Jesus, who suffered and died for souls precisely so they would not end up there and who Himself warned of the reality of the danger of hell throughout His earthly ministry? Or would it be Satan, the devil, who wants to see as many souls eternally damned as possible?
TL;DR
 
"Hell" is what the Bible calls "the Lake of Fire." The Lake of Fire kills all physical life on the planet. It occurs at the he end of the 1000 year reign of Jesus Christ, immediately before this world is transformed into the "new earth " and before The Father makes His home on the earth for all eternity
 
"Hell" is what the Bible calls "the Lake of Fire." The Lake of Fire kills all physical life on the planet. It occurs at the he end of the 1000 year reign of Jesus Christ, immediately before this world is transformed into the "new earth " and before The Father makes His home on the earth for all eternity
I look at it a bit differently. I see the separation of our body and spirit as a "spirit prison." When we are resurrected, we will truly be free again to evolve into our eternal potential with the eternal bodies never to die again. So, this spirit prison is more like Hell, where the wicked go and Paradise where the righteous and good people go awaiting the resurrection. Not all the spirits in Paradise have the Gospel and none i Hell have the Gospel yet. Jesus said he went to spirit prison, all spirits, to preach the Gospel. Peter writes about this in chapters 3 and 4. Satan (Lucifer) is the Perdition and he will rule Perdition and all those who would not accept Jesus as their Lord and Savior by the time they get to the judgment seat of God.
 
Any time something negative is said about Trump, his minions immediately ASSume the anti Trumper was a fan of Biden. I think they both suck. We need somebody more competent to run this country. I have yet to set any qualified candidates, but then again, can any politician be trusted?
 
"Hell" is what the Bible calls "the Lake of Fire." The Lake of Fire kills all physical life on the planet. It occurs at the he end of the 1000 year reign of Jesus Christ, immediately before this world is transformed into the "new earth " and before The Father makes His home on the earth for all eternity
The world war that will kill all life on earth is prevented from doing so by the return of Christ:

Matthew 24:22 "And unless those days were shortened, no flesh would be saved [alive]; but for the elect's sake those days will be shortened".

Hell, is a temporary holding place for those who will be called up to the White Throne Judgment following the 1,000 year reign of Christ:

2 Peter 2:4-5 For God did not spare even the angels who sinned. He threw them into hell, in gloomy pits of darkness, where they are being held until the day of judgment

Hell and death are thrown into the Lake of Fire which means hell and the Lake are 2 different things:

Rev. 20:14 And death and hell were cast into the lake of fire...

 
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The world war that will kill all life on earth is prevented from doing so by the return of Christ:

Matthew 24:22 "And unless those days were shortened, no flesh would be saved [alive]; but for the elect's sake those days will be shortened".

Hell, is a temporary holding place for those who will be called up to the White Throne Judgment following the 1,000 year reign of Christ:

2 Peter 2:4-5 For God did not spare even the angels who sinned. He threw them into hell, in gloomy pits of darkness, where they are being held until the day of judgment

Hell and death are thrown into the Lake of Fire which means hell and the Lake are 2 different things:

Rev. 20:14 And death and hell were cast into the lake of fire...

"Hell," in this case, is speaking of the GRAVE.
 
"Hell," in this case, is speaking of the GRAVE.
I don't find any scripture to substantiate your claim. Hell isn't described in the Bible as the grave. But it is described.
The bodies were asleep in the grave, their souls were not though:

Luke 16: 22-26 And it came to pass, that the beggar died, and was carried by the angels into Abraham's bosom: the rich man also died, and was buried;

And in hell he lift up his eyes, being in torments, and seeth Abraham afar off, and Lazarus in his bosom.​

And he cried and said, Father Abraham, have mercy on me, and send Lazarus, that he may dip the tip of his finger in water, and cool my tongue; for I am tormented in this flame.​

But Abraham said, Son, remember that thou in thy lifetime received thy good things, and likewise Lazarus evil things: but now he is comforted, and thou art tormented.​

And beside all this, between us and you there is a great gulf fixed: so that they which would pass from hence to you cannot; neither can they pass to us, that would come from thence.​

Abraham's side was called Paradise, the othere side, Hell. Jesus spent 3 days in Paradise and brought those in Paradise with Him when He returned. Their graves were opened and their sleeping bodies, now uncorruptable, were reunited with their souls.

Matthew 27: 50 The earth shook, the rocks split and the tombs broke open. The bodies of many holy people who had died were raised to life”.
^
Those were people/souls that were holy but couldn't enter Heaven directly because Christ had not yet died to remove their sins. The first thing Jesus did after He had died was retrieve them.
 
I don't find any scripture to substantiate your claim. Hell isn't described in the Bible as the grave. But it is described.
The bodies were asleep in the grave, their souls were not though:

Luke 16: 22-26 And it came to pass, that the beggar died, and was carried by the angels into Abraham's bosom: the rich man also died, and was buried;

And in hell he lift up his eyes, being in torments, and seeth Abraham afar off, and Lazarus in his bosom.​

And he cried and said, Father Abraham, have mercy on me, and send Lazarus, that he may dip the tip of his finger in water, and cool my tongue; for I am tormented in this flame.​

But Abraham said, Son, remember that thou in thy lifetime received thy good things, and likewise Lazarus evil things: but now he is comforted, and thou art tormented.​

And beside all this, between us and you there is a great gulf fixed: so that they which would pass from hence to you cannot; neither can they pass to us, that would come from thence.​

Abraham's side was called Paradise, the othere side, Hell. Jesus spent 3 days in Paradise and brought those in Paradise with Him when He returned. Their graves were opened and their sleeping bodies, now uncorruptable, were reunited with their souls.

Matthew 27: 50 The earth shook, the rocks split and the tombs broke open. The bodies of many holy people who had died were raised to life”.
^
Those were people/souls that were holy but couldn't enter Heaven directly because Christ had not yet died to remove their sins. The first thing Jesus did after He had died was retrieve them.

In the King James Bible, the Old Testament term Sheol is translated as "Hell" 31 times, and it is translated as "the grave" 31 times. Sheol is also translated as "the pit" three times. Modern Bible translations typically render Sheol as "the grave", "the pit", or "death".
1708025794904.png

Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia › wiki

Hell in Christianity - Wikipedia

 
So were they all in their separate tombs, asleep when Abraham and the rich man had a conversation?
Where were Jesus and the thief on the cross for those 3 days prior to their return to earth's surface?

Luke 23:42-43 Then he said to Jesus, “Lord, remember me when You come into Your kingdom.” And Jesus said to him, “Assuredly, I say to you, today you will be with Me in Paradise.” Also referred to not as Hell, or the grave, but Abraham's Bosom, a location separted from Hades by a deep chasm.
And it came to pass, that the beggar died, and was carried by the angels into Abraham's bosom.
Did Christ and the thief spend 3 days in Abraham's tomb?
Is Jesus saying that Paradise is the grave yard? We know He isn't referring to Heaven either, because He remarked that He had not yet ascended to Heaven. He even locates Hell for us. Keep in mind that graves were above ground, or at best a few feet under ground:

Matthew 12:40 For as Jonah was three days and three nights in the whale’s belly, so shall the Son of Man be three days and three nights in the heart of the earth.
 
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Is Hell FOREVER or does God destroy it absolutely in the End?​


God has no beginning or end.

What end are we talking about?

Believers of a supernatural God thing all that God creates is perfect.

Why would God destroy his perfect creation?

The lake of fire is not understood properly if it is destroyed.

That would be an admission that Yahweh missed the mark and sinned when he created this reality.

Hell and the lake of fire are perfect, to a believer, and cannot be destroyed.
 
Hell is for those reserved for later judgment. Lake of Fire is the permanent locale for those found guilty at that judgment.

2 Peter 2 He sent them to hell and put them in caves of darkness where they are being held for judgment.

They don't go from Hell to the White Throne Judgment, then back to Hell.
 
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Well, I don't know.. Whom do we consult on this important matter?

Protestants?
Catholics?
Both?

Both faith communities are messed up, as we all know. Where can we find the answer?

Hey, I know.. How about Jesus Christ and His Word? In Mt 25:31 and other psgs, Jesus speaks of ETERNAL damnation aka punishment. So, you'd think that would settle matters. If not, here is a (an admittedly lengthy!) commentary from an ERUDITE theologian

I found this at novusordo.watch.net, not sure who the author is, but again, the Sedevacantist Catholics (that site is Sede) have the Truth on their side vis a vis the Vatican and its corruption/heresies. That's not necessarily a reason to stop going to NO Churches (??)

I copied it to read in full later --though, so far, it seems I could have written a lot of it myself.

(Yours truly bolded certain parts)



Theologian at Novusordowatch
(who uses Christ's Words to refute Francis's)



Francis once again displayed his masterful skills of distorting Sacred Scripture when what it teaches doesn’t jibe with his false gospel of forgiveness without repentance, which, far from demonstrating God’s great mercy for sinners, makes a mockery of the Redemption and only assists souls in going to hell, not to Heaven.

Our Lord, we must recall, pardoned only one of the two thieves crucified with Him, because only one was contrite. In this manner He taught us never to despair of His mercy, but at the same time never to presume on it either. Both despair and presumption are mortal sins — the Catholic medium between the two is the theological virtue of hope.

The Gospel reading for the Novus Ordo Missae (not the traditional missal) last Sunday, June 25, 2023, was Matthew 10:26-33.. We will quote the passage in full, first from the traditional Catholic Douay-Rheims translation, then from the translation used in the official Novus Ordo lectionary of the United States: Matthew 10:26-33 (Douay-Rheims)

Therefore fear them not. For nothing is covered that shall not be revealed: nor hid, that shall not be known. That which I tell you in the dark, speak ye in the light: and that which you hear in the ear, preach ye upon the housetops. And fear ye not them that kill the body, and are not able to kill the soul: but rather fear him that can destroy both soul and body in hell. Are not two sparrows sold for a farthing? and not one of them shall fall on the ground without your Father. But the very hairs of your head are all numbered. Fear not therefore: better are you than many sparrows. Every one therefore that shall confess me before men, I will also confess him before my Father who is in heaven. But he that shall deny me before men, I will also deny him before my Father who is in heaven.

Matthew 10:26-33 (USCCB Lectionary)

Jesus said to the Twelve: “Fear no one. Nothing is concealed that will not be revealed, nor secret that will not be known. What I say to you in the darkness, speak in the light; what you hear whispered, proclaim on the housetops. And do not be afraid of those who kill the body but cannot kill the soul; rather, be afraid of the one who can destroy both soul and body in Gehenna. Are not two sparrows sold for a small coin? Yet not one of them falls to the ground without your Father’s knowledge. Even all the hairs of your head are counted. So do not be afraid; you are worth more than many sparrows. Everyone who acknowledges me before others I will acknowledge before my heavenly Father. But whoever denies me before others, I will deny before my heavenly Father.”

These words of [Jesus] are consoling in that they encourage and edify the soul by pointing out that although eternal damnation is a real and acute danger, nevertheless God will provide all the graces needed for us to win the battle against sin and temptation.. We are not left to our weakness; God will help us..

Our Lord.. warns that he who, not cooperating with the graces given him, will “deny me before men, I will also deny him before my Father who is in Heaven.” That’s a rather exclusionary message, one that clearly doesn’t work for Bergoglio’s new “big tent” synodal church. .

Knowing that we must tread the way of the Cross with Him if we are to persevere in grace (see Lk 9:23), our Lord warns that we must be willing to sacrifice any material good — even physical life itself — if necessary to preserve the state of sanctifying grace, which is the spiritual life of the soul: “And do not be afraid of those who kill the body but cannot kill the soul; rather, be afraid of the one who can destroy both soul and body in Gehenna.” Fr. Cornelius à Lapidé (1567-1637):

Verse 28. “And fear ye not them that kill the body, and are not able to kill the soul: but rather fear him that can destroy both soul and body in hell..” The sense is: Do not, from fear of death with which the persecutors will threaten you, deny My Faith, or cease from the preaching which I have commanded you, or commit any act unworthy of it, for if ye do this, ye will incur both the death of the body and the far worse and longer-lasting death of the soul, even its eternal death in hell, where the damned die an undying death, because they are constantly live [sic] in mortal torments and endure as though in living death and moribund life, according to Isaias 66:24, Their worm shall not die, and their fire shall not be quenched. Truly does S. Chrysostom say (hom. 5 ad pop.), “He who is always afraid of hell will never fall into its flames, for he is continually purified by this fear.”

Verse 33. But he that shall deny me before men, I will also deny him before my Father who is in heaven. Christ adds this, so that whoever is not moved by His magnificent promise, might be daunted by the terrible threat, that just as Christ will acknowledge those who acknowledge Him, so too, He will deny those who deny Him, saying, I never knew you. Depart from me, you that work iniquity! (Matth. 7:23), that is, go to hell, to Lucifer, whom you serve (Matth. 25:12 ff.).

à Lapide: Gospel.. Mt

There is no question that Christ’s doctrine is challenging — Christianity is not for wimps — but it is not difficult to understand. Notice that our Blessed Lord in His great goodness is pleased to present this particular doctrine in the context of His generous assistance of providing the graces necessary to persevere. That is why He can say in another place: “For my yoke is sweet and my burden light” (Mt 11:3). Our Redeemer does not leave us out in the cold, so to speak, with the dreadful prospect of having to give our lives for Him based on our own strength. No, He makes clear that He will sustain us through all trials if only we are faithful to Him. If, however, we fail to cooperate with His graces and deny Him, and if we persist in this frightful state until death, He will then also deny us. We can see, then, how very serious the matter is.

Francis twists Christ’s Words to make them compatible with Naturalism

The Gospel reading of last Sunday is, then, not terribly difficult to make sense of. Francis had a terrific opportunity … to remind people that all is lost if we lose our souls.. that this temporal life is as nothing when compared to eternity. Hell, eternal damnation, is a very real possibility, and we must arm ourselves with prayers, good works, and self-denial..

In today’s Gospel, Jesus repeats to his disciples three different times: “have no fear” (Mt 10:26, 28, 31). Shortly prior to this, he had spoken to them about the persecutions they would have to undergo for the Gospel, a fact that is still a reality. Since its beginning, in fact, the Church has experienced, together with joys – of which she has had many – many persecutions. It seems paradoxical: the proclamation of the Kingdom of God is a message of peace and justice, founded on fraternal charity and on forgiveness; and yet it meets with opposition, violence, persecution. Jesus, however, says not to fear, not because everything will be all right in the world, no, but because we are precious to his Father and nothing that is good will be lost. He therefore tells us not to let fear block us, but rather to fear one other thing, only one. What is the thing Jesus tells us we should fear?

We discover what it is through an image Jesus uses today: the image of “Gehenna” (cf. v. 28). The valley of “Gehenna” was a place the inhabitants of Jerusalem knew well. It was the city’s large garbage dump. Jesus speaks about it in order to say that the true fear we should have, is that of throwing away one’s own life. Jesus says, “Yes, be afraid of that”. It was like saying: you do not need so much to be afraid of suffering misunderstanding and criticism, of losing prestige and economic advantages to remain faithful to the Gospel, no, but of wasting your existence in the pursuit of trivial things that do not fill life with meaning.

This is important for us today. Even today, in fact, some are ridiculed or discriminated against for not following certain fads, which, however, place second-rate realities at the centre – for example, to follow after things instead of people, achievement instead of relationships. Let us give an example: I am thinking of some parents who need to work to maintain their family, but who cannot live for work alone – they need enough time to be with their children. I am also thinking of a priest or a sister who need to dedicate themselves to their service, without, however, forgetting to dedicate time to be with Jesus, otherwise, they will fall into spiritual worldliness and lose the sense of who they are. And again, I am thinking of a young man or woman who have thousands of commitments and passions – school, sports, various interests, cell phones and social networks – but who need to meet people and achieve great dreams, without losing time on passing things that do not leave their mark.

All of this, brothers and sisters, requires some renunciation regarding the idols of efficiency and consumerism. But this is necessary so as not to get lost in things that end up getting thrown out, as they threw things out in Gehenna back then. And people often end up in today’s Gehenna’s, instead. Let’s think, of the least who are often treated like waste products and unwanted objects. There is a cost to remain faithful to what counts. The cost is going against the tide, the cost is freeing oneself from being conditioned by popular opinion, the cost is being separated from those who “follow the current”. But it does not matter, Jesus says. What matters is not to throw away the greatest good: life. This is the only thing that should frighten us.
(Antipope Francis.. June 25, 2023)

…Perhaps we should be grateful that Bergoglio didn’t turn Christ’s warning about Gehenna into a sermon about the importance of recycling!

Francis… tries to get his hearers’ thoughts away from the supernatural and ..focused on [earthly] life

In today’s Gospel, Jesus repeats to his disciples three different times: “have no fear” (Mt 10:26, 28, 31). Shortly prior to this, he had spoken to them about the persecutions they would have to undergo for the Gospel, a fact that is still a reality. Since its beginning, in fact, the Church has experienced, together with joys – of which she has had many – many persecutions. It seems paradoxical: the proclamation of the Kingdom of God is a message of peace and justice, founded on fraternal charity and on forgiveness; and yet it meets with opposition, violence, persecution. Jesus, however, says not to fear, not because everything will be all right in the world, no, but because we are precious to his Father and nothing that is good will be lost. He therefore tells us not to let fear block us, but rather to fear one other thing, only one. What is the thing Jesus tells us we should fear?

… Certainly, peace, justice, charity, and forgiveness are part of the Gospel, but it cannot be reduced to that. The Good News of Jesus Christ is not the Kiwanis club with prayer.

If Francis actually taught the… full Gospel… he would see.. quickly why it meets with opposition from the world.

Christ was hated because, unlike Bergoglio, He did not preach a ‘hippie’ gospel. Rather, His preaching convicted the world of sin (cf. Jn 3:19; 16:8) and demanded the strictest standards of morality. For example, not only did Jesus condemn the external act of murder, but even uncharitable speech and hateful thoughts (see Mt 5:21-22); not only did He condemn the external act of adultery, as did the Jews as well, He made clear that even the least deliberately-willed impure thought was already an infraction of the divine law, and that it would be better to suffer any temporal sacrifice rather than commit mortal sin (see Mt 5:27-30). He sanctified matrimony by raising it to a grace-giving sacrament and restoring to it its original indissolubility (see Mt 5:31-32).

Christ preached the way of the Cross. He demanded not a merely external sanctity but one that consists in a true and inward renewal (rebirth) of the whole person (see Mt 5:20; Jn 3:5-6). He condemned vengeance… (see Mt 5:38-39). He demanded that we conform our lives to His (see Mt 11:29), exhorted all who can take it to perfect chastity (see Mt 19:11-12), and demanded that we love our neighbor as we love our very own selves (see Mk 12:31), even our enemies (see Mt 5:43-47). .

..He demanded that God be loved first and above all things (see Mk 12:29-30), including one’s family, relations, friends, and even life itself:

Do not think that I came to send peace upon earth: I came not to send peace, but the sword. For I came to set a man at variance against his father, and the daughter against her mother, and the daughter in law against her mother in law. And a man’s enemies shall be they of his own household. He that loveth father or mother more than me, is not worthy of me; and he that loveth son or daughter more than me, is not worthy of me. And he that taketh not up his cross, and followeth me, is not worthy of me. He that findeth his life, shall lose it: and he that shall lose his life for me, shall find it. (Matthew 10:34-39)

That is not the gospel preached by Bergoglio. No wonder the fake pope can’t figure out why anyone would oppose the Gospel! The true Gospel is not popular, not attractive to fallen man because it convicts him of sin and demands that he amend his ways under pain of eternal damnation. It requires self-denial, obedience to ecclesiastical authority, and sometimes even heroic sacrifices to save one’s soul: “…the kingdom of heaven suffereth violence, and the violent bear it away” (Mt 11:12).

“Gehenna” is used by our Lord as a metaphor for hell. The Catholic Encyclopedia explains:

…in the New Testament the term Gehenna is used more frequently in preference to hades, as a name for the place of punishment of the damned. Gehenna is the Hebrew gê-hinnom (Nehemiah 11:30), or the longer form gê-ben-hinnom (Joshua 15:8), and gê-benê-hinnom (2 Kings 23:10) “valley of the sons of Hinnom”. Hinnom seems to be the name of a person not otherwise known. The Valley of Hinnom is south of Jerusalem and is now called Wadi er-rababi. It was notorious as the scene, in earlier days, of the horrible worship of Moloch. For this reason it was defiled by Josias (2 Kings 23:10), cursed by Jeremias (Jeremiah 7:31-33), and held in abomination by the Jews, who, accordingly, used the name of this valley to designate the abode of the damned (Targ. Jon., Gen., iii, 24; Henoch, c. xxvi). And Christ adopted this usage of the term. (The Catholic Encyclopedia, s.v. “Hell”)

Interestingly enough, even Bergoglio’s own so-called Catechism of the Catholic Church notes:

Jesus often speaks of “Gehenna,” of “the unquenchable fire” reserved for those who to the end of their lives refuse to believe and be converted, where both soul and body can be lost. Jesus solemnly proclaims that he “will send his angels, and they will gather . . . all evil doers, and throw them into the furnace of fire,” and that he will pronounce the condemnation: “Depart from me, you cursed, into the eternal fire!” (Catechism of the Catholic Church, n. 1034)

So, when Francis says that Christ speaks about Gehenna “in order to say that the true fear we should have, is that of throwing away one’s own life”, that is inaccurate — He specifically warns against throwing one’s soul away, and He distinguishes it clearly from the life of the body. Notice how the false pope omits this crucial distinction and instead conflates both into “life”, hoping no one will notice.

Why Francis does this becomes apparent when we look at what he says immediately after, namely: “It was like saying: you do not need so much to be afraid of suffering misunderstanding and criticism, of losing prestige and economic advantages to remain faithful to the Gospel, no, but of wasting your existence in the pursuit of trivial things that do not fill life with meaning.”

Now it is clear: Bergoglio had to erase Christ’s contrast between the life of the body and the life of the soul in order to be able to make the divine warning about throwing your soul away (namely, into hell) into something about not “wasting your existence in the pursuit of trivial things that do not fill life with meaning”. Obviously, that is not what Christ said… Nor does life have to be “filled” with meaning, as if the meaning of our existence were something to be produced by us and not found in God and the Beatific Vision to which He has called us. But then those are supernatural things, and Francis wants to steer souls away from the supernatural and keep them focused on the things of the earth, lest they be saved: “He that is of the earth, of the earth he is, and of the earth he speaketh” (Jn 3:31).

The whole point of Christ’s warning in the Gospel passage is that one can spend one’s entire life doing non-trivial things — things that are good, legitimate, and important in themselves — and still go to hell! For example, a surgeon who saves lives every day for thirty years, or a social worker who frequently feeds the hungry, or an architect who designs the most magnificent cathedrals, all these people are doing good things but if they do not die in the state of sanctifying grace, they will merit only eternal damnation — not for the good things they did, of course, but for their mortal sins, which can only be blotted out with sanctifying grace, which cannot be “purchased” with naturally good works. Denial of this would constitute the heresy of Pelagianism — salvation by works without grace.

Francis:

... Even today, in fact, some are ridiculed or discriminated against for not following certain fads, which, however, place second-rate realities at the centre – for example, to follow after things instead of people, achievement instead of relationships. Let us give an example: I am thinking of some parents who need to work to maintain their family, but who cannot live for work alone – they need enough time to be with their children. I am also thinking of a priest or a sister who need to dedicate themselves to their service, without, however, forgetting to dedicate time to be with Jesus, otherwise, they will fall into spiritual worldliness and lose the sense of who they are. And again, I am thinking of a young man or woman who have thousands of commitments and passions – school, sports, various interests, cell phones and social networks – but who need to meet people and achieve great dreams, without losing time on passing things that do not leave their mark.

So here Francis simply doubles down on his distortion of the holy words of our Lord. One can follow after “people” and “relationships” instead of things and achievements all one’s life long — but if one dies in the state of mortal sin, everything will be lost… Francis is diverting people’s attention from the actual words of Christ to a fanciful reading that is compatible with his own [narrative].

The false pope is bluntly taking Christ’s exhortation not to lose one’s eternal life for the sake of one’s temporal life and twisting it into a Naturalist message of not to spend one’s temporal life on the trivial but rather on the meaningful. That is not what Christ said, nor is it what He meant! And Bergoglio knows it, obviously. All temporal life will end at death, “and after this the judgment” (Heb 9:27). If the soul is in the state of mortal sin, hell will be its eternal destiny. But that is a pesky little detail Bergoglio is bending over backwards to conceal from those who are unhappily seeking instruction from his blasphemous mouth.

Francis denounces figurative “idols”… (not so much literal idols):

All of this, brothers and sisters, requires some renunciation regarding the idols of efficiency and consumerism. But this is necessary so as not to get lost in things that end up getting thrown out, as they threw things out in Gehenna back then. And people often end up in today’s Gehenna’s, instead. Let’s think, of the least who are often treated like waste products and unwanted objects. There is a cost to remain faithful to what counts. The cost is going against the tide, the cost is freeing oneself from being conditioned by popular opinion, the cost is being separated from those who “follow the current”. But it does not matter, Jesus says. What matters is not to throw away the greatest good: life. This is the only thing that should frighten us.

So here the pseudo-papal shyster desperately tries to introduce one of his favorite talking points, which hinges on Gehenna having been a garbage dump. He then blatantly lies again by claiming that Christ’s teaching is: “What matters is not to throw away the greatest good: life.” No, this earthly life is not the greatest good, eternal life in Heaven is:

And calling the multitude together with his disciples, he said to them: If any man will follow me, let him deny himself, and take up his cross, and follow me. For whosoever will save his life, shall lose it: and whosoever shall lose his life for my sake and the gospel, shall save it. For what shall it profit a man, if he gain the whole world, and suffer the loss of his soul. Or what shall a man give in exchange for his soul? For he that shall be ashamed of me, and of my words, in this adulterous and sinful generation: the Son of man also will be ashamed of him, when he shall come in the glory of his Father with the holy angels. (Mark 8:34-38)

Francis adds insult to injury when in his very last paragraph he warns against “not putting [the] Gospel in first place”:

So let us ask ourselves: I, what do I fear? Not having what I like? Not reaching the goals society imposes? The judgement of others? Or rather of not pleasing the Lord, and not putting his Gospel in first place? Mary, ever Virgin, Mother most Wise, help us to be wise and courageous in the choices we make.

This false pope is a master deceiver, and he is audacious in his deception, for he denies the Gospel straight to your face and then exhorts you never to deny the Gospel. Bergoglio preaches “a charity without faith, very accommodating to unbelievers, which unfortunately opens the way to eternal ruin for all”, as Pope St. Pius X warned in his allocution of Apr. 17, 1907.

‘Pope’ Francis, Apostle of Hell

As we have seen, the true Gospel is supernatural; it is concerned first and foremost with eternal salvation, without which all is lost forever. The Gospel is not a sentimental collection of platitudes about human dignity, tolerance, unconditional acceptance and forgiveness, caresses and tenderness, or helping the needy. It is also not about dreaming, welcoming, including, accompanying, or affirming everyone and everything. That is Bergoglio’s false Naturalist gospel of man, not the true supernatural Gospel of Jesus Christ.

Christ became incarnate so we would be freed from the bondage of sin and be able to go to Heaven. He preached the truth about the fallen human condition and the divinely-given remedy, offering Himself as the Divine-Human Sacrifice to atone for our sins and purchase us back from the dominion of the evil one. Christ did not become man in order to preach a generic, interreligious “message of peace and justice, founded on fraternal charity and on forgiveness”.

This past Sunday, it is clear that Francis went out of his way to avoid speaking about eternal damnation; he instead bent over backwards to come up with some other “interpretation” of Christ’s plain words. But why? Who would have an interest in keeping the truth about hell away from souls?

Would it be our dear Lord Jesus, who suffered and died for souls precisely so they would not end up there and who Himself warned of the reality of the danger of hell throughout His earthly ministry? Or would it be Satan, the devil, who wants to see as many souls eternally damned as possible?

Hell is forever, you'll find out soon enough.
 
So were they all in their separate tombs, asleep when Abraham and the rich man had a conversation?
Where were Jesus and the thief on the cross for those 3 days prior to their return to earth's surface?

Luke 23:42-43 Then he said to Jesus, “Lord, remember me when You come into Your kingdom.” And Jesus said to him, “Assuredly, I say to you, today you will be with Me in Paradise.” Also referred to not as Hell, or the grave, but Abraham's Bosom, a location separted from Hades by a deep chasm.
And it came to pass, that the beggar died, and was carried by the angels into Abraham's bosom.
Did Christ and the thief spend 3 days in Abraham's tomb?
Is Jesus saying that Paradise is the grave yard? We know He isn't referring to Heaven either, because He remarked that He had not yet ascended to Heaven. He even locates Hell for us. Keep in mind that graves were above ground, or at best a few feet under ground:

Matthew 12:40 For as Jonah was three days and three nights in the whale’s belly, so shall the Son of Man be three days and three nights in the heart of the earth.
Is this question addressed to me?
 
Hell is for those reserved for later judgment. Lake of Fire is the permanent locale for those found guilty at that judgment.

2 Peter 2 He sent them to hell and put them in caves of darkness where they are being held for judgment.

They don't go from Hell to the White Throne Judgment, then back to Hell.
Does God not make all souls perfect and save us all the way scriptures say he does?

If not, then an imperfect soul can never get a chance to gain perfection as only God can grant that.

God is an a hole but not that big of an a hole, is he?
 

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