James Hetfield interview from 2016

Angelo

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Another really good interview from Joe Rogan.

James Hetfield is a musician, singer and songwriter known for being the co-founder, lead vocalist, rhythm guitarist and main songwriter for the American heavy metal band Metallica.

 

Harry Dresden

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saw them around 92 with Guns and Roses and Motorhead....
 

Montrovant

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The beginning of that interview is hilarious. Rogan talks about Aerosmith losing their edge, as if that didn't happen to Metallica. Then Hetfield says something about a band losing their way, again, as though that didn't happen to Metallica.

Then Hetfield talks about never letting each other down, as though they didn't let Jason Newstead down completely with the bass being almost nonexistent in ...And Justice.

Finally, Hetfield says there's always a better riff or better album coming, but that hasn't been true since ...And Justice.

I stopped there because the interview was clearly going to be ridiculous. :lol:
 

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Another really good interview from Joe Rogan.

James Hetfield is a musician, singer and songwriter known for being the co-founder, lead vocalist, rhythm guitarist and main songwriter for the American heavy metal band Metallica.

Joe is ok, but he has smoked too much dope
 

JBvM

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Compared to death metal actually, Metallica is
the Beach Boys.
The Hedonic Appeal of “Dreyer’s English”

A new entrant in this genre, “Dreyer’s English: An Utterly Correct Guide to Clarity and Style,” seems happily aware of its own planned obsolescence. The author is Benjamin Dreyer, the longtime copy chief at Random House. He grants that his rules are sometimes arbitrary (e.g., hyphenate “light-headed” but not “lighthearted”) and often fluid (although most sentences don’t benefit from the passive voice, he points out, some do). But he’s a true believer, full of passionate opinions about “actually” (never say it),
 
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Angelo

Angelo

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Joe is ok, but he has smoked too much dope
His questions are a little too deep sometimes...the way he sort of dwells on one topic way too long ( like bees in this one. ) The Mike Tyson interview is interesting. That's the last one I've seen aside from this in awhile. Tulsi Gabbard and Elon Musk not bad.
 

Marion Morrison

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Joe is ok, but he has smoked too much dope
His questions are a little too deep sometimes...the way he sort of dwells on one topic way too long ( like bees in this one. ) The Mike Tyson interview is interesting. That's the last one I've seen aside from this in awhile. Tulsi Gabbard and Elon Musk not bad.
You need to see the Blue cheese one. ;)
 

Billy_Kinetta

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JBvM

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Joe is ok, but he has smoked too much dope
His questions are a little too deep sometimes...the way he sort of dwells on one topic way too long ( like bees in this one. ) The Mike Tyson interview is interesting. That's the last one I've seen aside from this in awhile. Tulsi Gabbard and Elon Musk not bad.
I like Joe, but many of his so-called deep conversations are really mental masturbation

when he has on people like the science guy from the planetarium it's good, but on those Joe has to keep up and not go deep into smokey mental masturbation
 

Montrovant

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saw them around 92 with Guns and Roses and Motorhead....
That was before they became fags. :21:
Well, the decline started with the black album in 91, but yeah. :p
but yet many of their fans who thought they sold out still managed to buy that LP....
I've never understood that album's popularity with fans of the band prior to its release. It's clearly a departure from what they'd done before. Not as big a departure as the albums that came after, but still, going from ...And Justice to the black album was a huge disappointment; one of the biggest I've ever experienced in music.
 

Harry Dresden

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saw them around 92 with Guns and Roses and Motorhead....
That was before they became fags. :21:
Well, the decline started with the black album in 91, but yeah. :p
but yet many of their fans who thought they sold out still managed to buy that LP....
I've never understood that album's popularity with fans of the band prior to its release. It's clearly a departure from what they'd done before. Not as big a departure as the albums that came after, but still, going from ...And Justice to the black album was a huge disappointment; one of the biggest I've ever experienced in music.
the black album was also their biggest selling LP.....so i think many of those fans secretly liked it but were not saying that to the other die hards...
 

Montrovant

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saw them around 92 with Guns and Roses and Motorhead....
That was before they became fags. :21:
Well, the decline started with the black album in 91, but yeah. :p
but yet many of their fans who thought they sold out still managed to buy that LP....
I've never understood that album's popularity with fans of the band prior to its release. It's clearly a departure from what they'd done before. Not as big a departure as the albums that came after, but still, going from ...And Justice to the black album was a huge disappointment; one of the biggest I've ever experienced in music.
the black album was also their biggest selling LP.....so i think many of those fans secretly liked it but were not saying that to the other die hards...
Quite a few of my friends that were already Metallica fans liked the black album. They didn't hide it. :lol:

I remember waiting in anticipation for the Enter Sandman video on MTV; it was my first exposure to the black album. I wanted so much to like it, but it just wasn't the same Metallica. :(

The black album isn't garbage. It has some decent tunes on it, but it doesn't come close to their earlier work, especially not Master or And Justice. It always struck me as being a conscious attempt to reach a wider audience; a 'sell-out' album. I can think of it now and not only understand such a move, but even agree with it. Hell, given an opportunity to make a bunch more money with a band by creating a less extreme sound, something more mainstream, I'd probably do the same. One of the things that bothered me about it all, though, were the attitudes and comments from the band. I believe Lars Ulrich once said something along the lines of "We never said we were a metal band." Someone from a band named Metallica saying they never claimed to be a metal band! :rofl:

Move on to albums like Load or St. Anger and Metallica became more like Rockica. ;)
 

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