What religion were our founding fathers worshipping?

Discussion in 'Education' started by solarefficiency, Aug 13, 2008.

  1. solarefficiency
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    solarefficiency Rookie

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    What religion were our founding fathers worshipping? When I say founding fathers, I mean founding fathers of the United States of America - George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, Benjamin Franklin, John Adams, etc.? I do not believe it was Christianity. The original Constitution does not mention any specific reference to Christianity being the official religion of the USA. Am I wrong?
     
  2. Gungnir
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    Gungnir Member

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    Some (or most) were deist with a Christian background. Jefferson was quite clear about his contempt for the big church organizations of the day. They really tried to obscure the issue as to not provoke intra-Christianity tensions as in Europe. As it so happens that obscurity was later expanded to include non-Christian religions.
     
  3. manifold
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    manifold Diamond Member

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    I'm not aware of any worship of religion by anyone, ever. My understanding is that it is a deity that's being worshipped, not the institution of said worship. Perhaps the difference is more subtle and less obvious than I would've thought. Or maybe you're sharp as a marble. Again, it's hard to tell.
     
  4. morpheus
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    morpheus Member

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    The American Revolution was highly influenced by the European Enlightenment, which promoted separation of church and state, and religious moderation particularly in government, culture, and academia. This movement led to the secularization of politics in various degrees, from stricter separation of chuch and state like in the United States, to retaining church-state relations nominally while tolerating religious minorities, as became the case in Britain. At the time of the Revolution, the vast majority of Americans where -then as now- nominal Christians, including the politicians who wrote the Constitution. However, an additional factor that lead to such a separation of church and state was the desire to avoid the inter-Christian sectarian tensions seen in Europe before the Enlightenment. Aside from the fact that -by the time of the Revolution- American society had evolved from the strict theocratic puratinism of the early 17th century, to a more liberal society by the late 18th. Hence religion had a diminished role in contemporary life in the 1770s, relative to the 1600s.
     
    Last edited: Aug 15, 2008
  5. Inferno
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    Inferno boatwoman

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    I know Jefferson was Unitarian. I am not certain he practiced it. I am not sure about the rest. They didn't want a religion to run the country so they didn't make a point of talking about it. They didn't put it in the documents what god they may have followed.
     
  6. morpheus
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    morpheus Member

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    Well, we know they were all nominal Christians (whatever the sect), and the term "God" appeared occasionally in official texts/slogans (ie "In God we Trust"). Of course, this could also refer to other monotheistic religions, but none of the politicians of the 1770s were Muslim, and the paradigm of the day was intra-Christian differences.
     
  7. editec
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    editec Mr. Forgot-it-All

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    The religion of revolution.

    It's fallen out of favor, and been replaced with worshipping money and those what's got it, I think.
     
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  8. bobbymcgill
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    bobbymcgill Member

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    Interesting to note that the first country to recognize the U.S. was Morocco.

    In the treaty signed with them their is a passage clearly stating that the U.S. was a secular nation and had no qualms with Islam.
     
  9. Gungnir
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    I believe most of our early treaties with the Barbary States has America as an nonreligious government.
     
  10. editec
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    editec Mr. Forgot-it-All

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    The religion the FF really worshiped was rational materialism.

    As a reaction to monarchism, it made great sense.

    But centuries later we're beginning to realize that this philosophy has its own unique set of problematic outcomes, too.

    Time for a new world philosophy for the 21st century, methinks.
     

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