Zone1 sacraments are unbiblical

ninja007

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Living rent free in libs heads

By David J. Stewart​


Mark 7:6-7, “He answered and said unto them, Well hath Esaias prophesied of you hypocrites, as it is written, This people honoureth me with their lips, but their heart is far from me. Howbeit in vain do they worship me, teaching for doctrines the commandments of men.”

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Sacraments are NOT taught in the Bible. The Catholic Church is infamous for their unscriptural Seven Sacraments, which they mandate for salvation in the Catholic faith. If you don't perform these Sacrament in the Catholic religion, then you cannot go to Heaven according to Catholic heresies.

Here is a list of the unbiblical Catholic Seven Sacraments, with hyperlinks to a Catholic website explaining what they mean to a Catholic . . .


The Word of God DOESN'T teach anything about performing Sacraments in order to be saved. These are the evil manmade traditions which Jesus condemned in Mark 7:6-13. Jesus said in Mark 7:9 that the religious Jews knowingly rejected God's Commandments in exchange for keeping their OWN traditions. The Word of God condemns manmade traditions.

Protestant churches such as the Lutherans and Presbyterians only have two Sacraments; namely, Holy Communion and Water Baptism. Neither the terms “sacrament” nor “holy communion” are found anywhere in the Bible.

Water Baptism and the Lord's Supper were only established as ordinances in the Bible.

Water Baptism is one's public profession of faith in the Lord. Water Baptism is NOT a requirement for salvation (1st Corinthians 1:17). We are saved simply by faith in Jesus as the Christ, the Son of God. John 20:31 plainly teaches, “But these are written, that ye might believe that Jesus is the Christ, the Son of God; and that believing ye might have life through his name.” The moment we place our faith in Jesus Christ, the Son of God, we are automatically baptized with the Holy Ghost, Who comes into our body to live (Matthew 3:11; Romans 8:9). This has nothing to do with Water Baptism, which is an act of obedience only allowed for believers (Acts 8:36-37).

The Lord's Supper was established by the Lord only to do in REMEMBRANCE of His shed blood and broken body given for our redemption (Luke 22:19). Jesus paid our sin debt. The Lord's Supper is not a magical superstitious ritual. Martin Luther in his catechism writings mandated keeping the Holy Communion to get to Heaven. The Lutheran Church is one of the biggest deceptions in the world. Under the guise of exiting the Catholic Church, Martin Luther simply begat a new religion patterned after the whore of Catholicism.

Lutherans worship Mary, which is the demonic practice of idolatry. The Lutheran Church is of the Devil. Most Lutherans are in denial, claiming to be be saved by faith alone; yet, Martin Luther plainly taught that no one could go to heaven without being Water baptized. In fact, Martin Luther was so far out in left field doctrinally that he taught salvation was possible through Water Baptism, even without having any faith in Jesus Christ. Tragically, many woefully ignorant pastors and Christians today praise Martin Luther. Mr. Luther was a heretic until the day he died.

The bottom line is that Sacraments are NOT taught in the Bible. The term isn't even found in the Scriptures, nor the concept of any divine grace being bestowed upon the participants of Water Baptism or the Lord's Supper. Catholics teach the heretical doctrine of TRANSUBSTANTIATION (i.e., bread and wine literally turn into the body and blood of Jesus to give spiritual life). That is a form of spiritual cannibalism. So do Catholics also digest and eliminate Jesus in their bodily wastes? What a blasphemous and disrespectful teaching by Catholics! It is utter nonsense.

Lutherans teach a similar doctrine called CONSUBSTANTIATION (i.e., the bread and wine do not literally become Jesus, but they do produce spiritual life to the participant). Again, such a notion is NOT taught anywhere in the Scriptures.

The term “Protestant” is NOT found in the Bible either. Being a Protestant DOESN'T make a person a Christian. It just means that Protestants object to the methods and hierarchical authority of the Catholic Church. Luther's 95-Thesis did not condemn Catholicism for it's hellish heresies; but rather, for disagreements with the way the Church was run. Luther remained in the Catholic Church for another 2-years after he allegedly found the Lord. Luther came out of the Catholic religion; but the Catholic religion never came out of Martin Luther!

Jesus commanded in John 5:39 for all believers to SEARCH THE SCRIPTURES!

This eliminates the bogus teachings of Protestantism, Sacraments, Infant Baptism and Holy Communion. Phooey on the Westminster Confession (which is the official doctrinal statement of the Presbyterian Church). I am a born-again Christian. “Born-again” is a Biblical term mentioned in John 3:1-7 and 1st Peter 1:23. The term “Christian” is mentioned in Acts 11:26; 26:28; 1st Peter 4:16). Phooey on the Sacramental Salvation of the Catholic Church and the unbiblical Sacraments of apostate religions such as Lutherans and Presbyterians.

Certainly, there have been some former mighty men of God within the Presbyterian Church, such as Evangelist Billy Sunday and Pastor J. Vernon McGee; however, the majority of their churches today have departed from the Biblical faith and are practicing Infant Baptism and teach that Water Baptism bestows spiritual grace to the participant. They also follow the Westminster Confession which teaches that ministers have the power to forgive other's sins. That is no better than the hellish heresy within Catholicism that the Priest has the power to forgive sins. No they don't! Only God can forgive sin (Mark 2:7,10).

I encourage you, whoever you may be, to follow only THE BIBLE. Beware of the writings of men when those writings are elevated as an authority to live by. The Bible is the only Book and Final Authority in my life.

So many religious people today are divided between Jacob Arminius and John Calvin's teachings. Why follow either of those men? Those men have been dead for centuries! Both men taught heresies, mostly John Calvin. Just obey the Bible! If you have a King James Bible, then you have all you need! 2nd Timothy 3:16, “All Scripture is given by inspiration of God, and is profitable for doctrine, for reproof, for correction, for instruction in righteousness.”

We ought to learn a lesson from 1st Corinthians 1:11-12, “For it hath been declared unto me of you, my brethren, by them which are of the house of Chloe, that there are contentions among you. Now this I say, that every one of you saith, I am of Paul; and I of Apollos; and I of Cephas; and I of Christ.” The only one we should follow is Jesus Christ!

I hope that this article will be read by many people, who will decide in their heart to SEARCH THE SCRIPTURES and allow God's Word to be a LAMP unto their feet as Psalm 119:105 teaches. Leave alone the writings of men as being an authority in your life. The Bible is our Authority as Christians. God is all you need.

All the grace we will ever need is received the moment we trust Jesus, by faith, as Savior (Ephesians 2:8-9). The saving grace that is granted at the moment of genuine faith is the only saving grace God’s Word calls on us to receive. This grace is received by faith, not by observing rituals. So, while the seven sacraments are “good things to do,” when they are understood in a biblical context, the concept of the seven sacraments as “conferring sanctifying grace” is completely unbiblical.


 
All the grace we will ever need is received the moment we trust Jesus, by faith, as Savior (Ephesians 2:8-9). The saving grace that is granted at the moment of genuine faith is the only saving grace God’s Word calls on us to receive. This grace is received by faith, not by observing rituals. So, while the seven sacraments are “good things to do,” when they are understood in a biblical context, the concept of the seven sacraments as “conferring sanctifying grace” is completely unbiblical.
Completely “unbiblical” you say.

Wait, who assembled the Bible in the first place?
 
ninja007, what is your agenda? Do you have a viable alternative to Catholicism that you want us to come to?
 
By David J. Stewart​




All the grace we will ever need is received the moment we trust Jesus, by faith, as Savior (Ephesians 2:8-9). The saving grace that is granted at the moment of genuine faith is the only saving grace God’s Word calls on us to receive. This grace is received by faith, not by observing rituals. So, while the seven sacraments are “good things to do,” when they are understood in a biblical context, the concept of the seven sacraments as “conferring sanctifying grace” is completely unbiblical.


Not sure what this is all about. First of all, what are "Sacraments?" They are the bread and wine that the Savior instituted for the people to do often to remember him. To remember what? The sacrifice of dying and being resurrected so that we may die and be resurrected. The Lord himself was using symbolism to strengthen the faith of the Apostles and disciples. Symbolism was taught extensively by Jesus Christ. Baptism is symbolic of our old sinful self dying and then being reborn in the Lord. The Sacraments can help us remember our baptisms and the covenants we make with the Lord at that event or work. Baptism, Sacraments, giving the gift of the Holy Ghost are examples of the "works" James was saying when he said "Faith without works is dead." In other words, partake of the sacraments after you have been baptized by the water and the spirit that shows the Lord your faith in him and his atoning sacrifice.
Ephesians 2:8, "For by grace are ye saved through faith; and that not of yourselves: it is the gift of God:"
Ephesians 2:9, "Not of works, lest any man should boast."
Ephesians 2:10, :For we are his workmanship, created in Christ Jesus unto good works, which God hath before ordained that we should walk in them (works).

So, what gives. First we aren't to d works but then we must to works (good works). The key is that good works come from ordination by the priesthood of God. Baptism and the Sacraments are good works performed by those call and ordained to perform these ordinances. You cannot take upon yourself this ordination of the power and authority of God, the priesthood. Thus, not all people receive the priesthood. And, you cannot say you get the priesthood to perform the ordinations of baptism and sacrament because you simply believe. Protestantism goes down again! So does non-denominational churches and religions.
 
By David J. Stewart​




All the grace we will ever need is received the moment we trust Jesus, by faith, as Savior (Ephesians 2:8-9). The saving grace that is granted at the moment of genuine faith is the only saving grace God’s Word calls on us to receive. This grace is received by faith, not by observing rituals. So, while the seven sacraments are “good things to do,” when they are understood in a biblical context, the concept of the seven sacraments as “conferring sanctifying grace” is completely unbiblical.



Does the Coptic church also have sacraments?
 
Not sure what this is all about. First of all, what are "Sacraments?" They are the bread and wine that the Savior instituted for the people to do often to remember him. To remember what? The sacrifice of dying and being resurrected so that we may die and be resurrected. The Lord himself was using symbolism to strengthen the faith of the Apostles and disciples. Symbolism was taught extensively by Jesus Christ. Baptism is symbolic of our old sinful self dying and then being reborn in the Lord. The Sacraments can help us remember our baptisms and the covenants we make with the Lord at that event or work. Baptism, Sacraments, giving the gift of the Holy Ghost are examples of the "works" James was saying when he said "Faith without works is dead." In other words, partake of the sacraments after you have been baptized by the water and the spirit that shows the Lord your faith in him and his atoning sacrifice.
Ephesians 2:8, "For by grace are ye saved through faith; and that not of yourselves: it is the gift of God:"
Ephesians 2:9, "Not of works, lest any man should boast."
Ephesians 2:10, :For we are his workmanship, created in Christ Jesus unto good works, which God hath before ordained that we should walk in them (works).

So, what gives. First we aren't to d works but then we must to works (good works). The key is that good works come from ordination by the priesthood of God. Baptism and the Sacraments are good works performed by those call and ordained to perform these ordinances. You cannot take upon yourself this ordination of the power and authority of God, the priesthood. Thus, not all people receive the priesthood. And, you cannot say you get the priesthood to perform the ordinations of baptism and sacrament because you simply believe. Protestantism goes down again! So does non-denominational churches and religions.


The Coptic Orthodox Church observes seven sacraments: Baptism, Chrismation, Repentance and Confession, the Eucharist, Matrimony, Priesthood and the Unction of the Sick.
Coptic Church › copti...
Coptic Faith
 
When one attends a church founded by apostates you get apostasy as your religion. You don't get a personal relationship with the creator of existence and all the many benefits that it provides. You only get criticisms of what they don't believe. Very sad.
 

Are the seven Catholic sacraments biblical?​


audio


Answer

“Sacraments are outward signs of inward grace, instituted by Christ for our sanctification” (taken from the Catholic Encyclopedia). The Roman Catholic Church teaches that while God gives grace to man without outward symbols (sacraments), He has also chosen to give grace to man through visible symbols. Because God has done this, man is foolish to not make use of this God-provided means of gaining sanctification.

In order to qualify as a sacrament, the Roman Catholic Church states that it must meet the following three criteria: a) the external, that is, a sensibly perceptible sign of sanctifying grace, b) the conferring of sanctifying grace, c) the institution by God or, more accurately, by the God-Man Jesus Christ. Thus, sacraments are not merely a symbol, but are believed to actually confer sanctifying grace upon the recipient. The Roman Catholic Church believes that all of their seven sacraments were instituted by Christ Himself. There are seven Roman Catholic Sacraments, and they are as follows:

1) Baptism, which the Roman Catholic Church teaches removes original sin while infusing the act with sanctifying grace.
2) Penance, in which one confesses his/her sins to a priest.
3) The Eucharist, considered the reception and consumption of the actual body and blood of Christ.
4) Confirmation, a formal acceptance into the church along with special anointing of the Holy Spirit.
5) Anointing of the sick, performed by a priest using oil. The priest anoints the sick person´s forehead and hands with oil. This is associated not only with bodily healing but with forgiveness of sins. When performed on a dying person, it is called Extreme Unction (or last rites or final anointing).
6) Holy Orders, the process by which men are ordained to clergy.
7) Matrimony, which provides special grace to a couple.

The following are verses commonly cited to support the Roman Catholic belief concerning the sacraments: “Therefore I remind you to stir up the gift of God which is in you through the laying on of my hands" (2 Timothy 1:6). "Jesus answered, ‘Most assuredly, I say to you, unless one is born of water and the Spirit, he cannot enter the kingdom of God’" (John 3:5). "Not by works of righteousness which we have done, but according to His mercy He saved us, through the washing of regeneration and renewing of the Holy Spirit" (Titus 3:5). "That He might sanctify and cleanse her with the washing of water by the word" (Ephesians 5:26). "If you forgive the sins of any, they are forgiven them; if you retain the sins of any, they are retained" (John 20:23). "And the prayer of faith will save the sick, and the Lord will raise him up. And if he has committed sins, he will be forgiven" (James 5:15). "Then they laid hands on them, and they received the Holy Spirit" (Acts 8:17). "Whoever eats My flesh and drinks My blood has eternal life, and I will raise him up at the last day. For My flesh is food indeed, and My blood is drink indeed" (John 6:54-55).

It might seem by looking at these verses by themselves that, indeed, certain external actions do convey some benefit (such as eternal life, the forgiveness of sins, the presence or power of the Holy Spirit, etc.). However, when taken in the context of Scripture as a whole, there is no foundation for the belief that God ever intended these passages to be taken as support for rituals as a means of conveying grace. In other words, the whole idea of "sacraments" that convey saving grace upon people is unbiblical.

Two of the main sacraments specifically are said by the Roman Catholic Church to be necessary in order to gain eternal life: baptism and communion. Because of the Roman Catholic Church belief that baptism is required for salvation, Catholics maintain that it is important to baptize infants. But nowhere in Scripture can you find even a single example or command to do so. Some Roman Catholics use Acts 16:33 as a possible example, because it states that the Philippian jailor "and his family" were baptized. But, taking this verse in context, we note two things:

(1) When the jailor asked Paul what he must do to be saved, Paul did NOT say, "Believe on Jesus and be baptized and take communion." Rather, Paul said, "Believe on the Lord Jesus Christ, and you will be saved, you and your household" (v. 31). Thus, we see that it is faith that is the ingredient necessary for salvation. It was understood that one who believed would be baptized, but baptism was not necessary for salvation. If it were, Paul would have given it more weight in his missionary journeys (1 Corinthians 1:14-18).

(2) We see that the "family" could not have included infants or toddlers, as it states in verse 34 that the jailor had "believed in God with all his household." Infants and toddlers cannot exercise faith in God in such a fashion.

Again and again throughout Scripture, faith, not faith PLUS baptism, is seen as the means through which one receives salvation (John 1:12; 3:14-16; Ephesians 2:8-9; Romans 3:19-26; 4; 10:9-13; etc.).

Turning to communion, the Roman Catholic Church makes it clear that they take John 6:54 literally when Jesus says, "Unless you eat of the flesh of the Son of Man and drink His blood, you have no life in you." The problem is that their belief that Jesus is speaking literally here is not in keeping with the context of the passage in which Jesus repeatedly states the importance of faith in Him and His coming atoning death for their sins (see John 6:29,35,40,47 and consider the whole message of the gospel of John, as stated in John 20:31).

When one examines the remaining sacraments, one finds that the belief that they convey "sanctifying grace" is not in keeping with the context of the rest of the Bible. Yes, all Christians should be baptized, but baptism does not infuse us with grace. Yes, all Christians should partake of the Lord’s Supper, but doing so does not confer sanctifying grace. Yes, we should confess our sins, not to a priest, but rather to God (1 John 1:9). Having a formal training program and formal acceptance into the church is a good thing to do, but it does not convey saving grace. Being approved as a church leader is an honorable thing, but it does not result in grace. Marriage is a wonderful and blessed event in the life of a couple, but it is not the means of how God graces us. Praying for and with a person who is dying is a godly thing to do – but it does not add grace to our account.

All the grace we will ever need is received the moment we trust Jesus, by faith, as Savior (Ephesians 2:8-9). The saving grace that is granted at the moment of genuine faith is the only saving grace God’s Word calls on us to receive. This grace is received by faith, not by observing rituals. So, while the seven sacraments are “good things to do,” when they are understood in a biblical context, the concept of the seven sacraments as “conferring sanctifying grace” is completely unbiblical.
 
By David J. Stewart​




All the grace we will ever need is received the moment we trust Jesus, by faith, as Savior (Ephesians 2:8-9). The saving grace that is granted at the moment of genuine faith is the only saving grace God’s Word calls on us to receive. This grace is received by faith, not by observing rituals. So, while the seven sacraments are “good things to do,” when they are understood in a biblical context, the concept of the seven sacraments as “conferring sanctifying grace” is completely unbiblical.



 
Yep. Look it up. So has and others still do


The 7 Sacraments are: baptism, confirmation, eucharist, penance, anointing the sick, marriage, and holy orders.

Baptism, the eucharist, anointing the sick, marriage, and holy orders are all clearly found in scripture.

Baptism: Matthew 25:18. "Go therefore and make disciples of all the nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit." Protestants say that baptism should be done only when someone announces his intention to become a Christian, i.e. Protestants don't believe in baptizing a baby. Nowhere in the Bible is there any mention of baptizing a baby.

Eucharist: Luke 22:19. " And He took bread, gave thanks and broke it, and gave it to them, saying, 'This is My body which is given for you; do this in remembrance of Me.'"

Anointing: James 5:14. "Is anyone among you sick? Let him call for the elders of the church, and let them pray over him, anointing him with oil in the name of the Lord."

Marriage: Genesis 2:24. "Therefore a man shall leave his father and mother and be joined to his wife, and they shall become one flesh."

Holy Orders: 1 Timothy 3:1. "This is a faithful saying: If a man desires the position of a bishop, he desires a good work."

Confirmation is not found in the Bible. But the basic idea of confirmation is that a young person or a new Christian is taught the fundamentals of the faith, and when they complete this, there is a sort of "graduation ceremony". The Bible does say that new Christians should be taught the faith. So I don't think most Protestants object to the idea in principle. Some Protestants do practice confirmation.
 
The 7 Sacraments are: baptism, confirmation, eucharist, penance, anointing the sick, marriage, and holy orders.

Baptism, the eucharist, anointing the sick, marriage, and holy orders are all clearly found in scripture.

Baptism: Matthew 25:18. "Go therefore and make disciples of all the nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit." Protestants say that baptism should be done only when someone announces his intention to become a Christian, i.e. Protestants don't believe in baptizing a baby. Nowhere in the Bible is there any mention of baptizing a baby.

Eucharist: Luke 22:19. " And He took bread, gave thanks and broke it, and gave it to them, saying, 'This is My body which is given for you; do this in remembrance of Me.'"

Anointing: James 5:14. "Is anyone among you sick? Let him call for the elders of the church, and let them pray over him, anointing him with oil in the name of the Lord."

Marriage: Genesis 2:24. "Therefore a man shall leave his father and mother and be joined to his wife, and they shall become one flesh."

Holy Orders: 1 Timothy 3:1. "This is a faithful saying: If a man desires the position of a bishop, he desires a good work."

Confirmation is not found in the Bible. But the basic idea of confirmation is that a young person or a new Christian is taught the fundamentals of the faith, and when they complete this, there is a sort of "graduation ceremony". The Bible does say that new Christians should be taught the faith. So I don't think most Protestants object to the idea in principle. Some Protestants do practice confirmation.
1Corinthians 15:29. Clearly defined. Follows 1Peter chapters 3 and 4 where the spirits of the dead are preached to so that they would be judged by those in the flesh.
 
Confirmation is not found in the Bible. But the basic idea of confirmation is that a young person or a new Christian is taught the fundamentals of the faith, and when they complete this, there is a sort of "graduation ceremony". The Bible does say that new Christians should be taught the faith. So I don't think most Protestants object to the idea in principle. Some Protestants do practice confirmation.
Confirmation is i the Bible. After his ascension, Jesus sent the Holy Spirit onto his disciples. This is in Acts, and Acts also addressed the question of one who was baptized, but had not yet received the Holy Spirit. Confirmation is centered on the coming of the Holy Spirit upon one.
 

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