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Is old music killing new music?

Gracie

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Old songs now represent 70 percent of the U.S. music market, according to the latest numbers from MRC Data, a music-analytics firm. Those who make a living from new music—especially that endangered species known as the working musician—should look at these figures with fear and trembling. But the news gets worse: The new-music market is actually shrinking. All the growth in the market is coming from old songs.

Is it? Yup. Why? Cuz ours are better. :icon_sjung:
 
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Gracie

Gracie

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TroglocratsRdumb

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the best pop songs are from the late 60s and early 70s
the worst pop songs are right now
 

WinterBorn

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I saw an interesting interview with Frank Zappa


It was the young executives who created the music that simply copies whatever made money. It is the musical equivalent of Paint by Numbers.
 

fncceo

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Those who make a living from new music—especially that endangered species known as the working musician—

There's always money to be made as a "Flock of Seagulls" cover band.

A_Flock_of_Seagulls.jpg
 

WinterBorn

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One problem is the lack of money to be made selling their music. Concerts still make a lot. But so many people want free music. So the artists don't make money off of it.
 

fncceo

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One problem is the lack of money to be made selling their music. Concerts still make a lot. But so many people want free music. So the artists don't make money off of it.

Mozart was well paid (in many cases) for the first drafts of his musical commissions but ... unfortunately, any music he wrote, once performed, became public domain and he never received a penny for it after it was first heard. Anyone could play his music for free.

This is why the (arguably) greatest composer of music in human history died a pauper, deep in debt.
 
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Gracie

Gracie

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The crap I hear in todays music is like the new cars. They all look the same. In this case, SOUND the same. And a lot of it is "borrowed", but tweaked by the singer(s) who don't have the brains to write their own.
 

WinterBorn

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The crap I hear in todays music is like the new cars. They all look the same. In this case, SOUND the same. And a lot of it is "borrowed", but tweaked by the singer(s) who don't have the brains to write their own.

That goes back to what Zappa said. The young music executives don't want new music. They want what they think sells. Which just a weak copy of what sold last month or last year.
 

Hellbilly

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That goes back to what Zappa said. The young music executives don't want new music. They want what they think sells. Which just a weak copy of what sold last month or last year.
That is 100% truth, but there are still tons of great musicians/bands out there. You just need to discover them. I think one of the best things Apple Music ever did was to allow bands who don't have a major record deal to be on their service. My current favorite band is The Native Howl, who are a mix of thrash and bluegrass. Very creative and gritty. I discovered them on Facebook, now I can't get enough of them.
 

Muhammed

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I think a lot of the problem with today's popular music is technical. They overproduce everything. Crappy sounding synth sounds, autotune, digital compression and shit like that.

Let the musicians play!
 

sparky

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Classic sells well for cover bands , there's a high recognition factor to it, but it's like they all stole each other's set list after a while.

Newer music sells to younger crowds, so if that's your target audience , you'll need to find newer stuff to play.

One may find it has a high recognition w/them these days

~S~
 

Mashmont

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Old songs now represent 70 percent of the U.S. music market, according to the latest numbers from MRC Data, a music-analytics firm. Those who make a living from new music—especially that endangered species known as the working musician—should look at these figures with fear and trembling. But the news gets worse: The new-music market is actually shrinking. All the growth in the market is coming from old songs.

Is it? Yup. Why? Cuz ours are better. :icon_sjung:
Yes, that's the reason. Another reason is there are so many baby boomers. You got to Golden Corral or Cracker Barrel, it's a lot of old people and it's their music being played over the speakers. My son worked at Cracker Barrel for a time, and he knows all the old songs.
 

Hellbilly

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Yes, that's the reason. Another reason is there are so many baby boomers. You got to Golden Corral or Cracker Barrel, it's a lot of old people and it's their music being played over the speakers. My son worked at Cracker Barrel for a time, and he knows all the old songs.
You can't kill music.
 

Blues Man

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What's happening is that many artists are selling the rights to their catalogs.

These rights are being snapped up by investors who want to make a quick return on their money so all this older music is being licensed out like crazy from commercials to jingles to movies and TV so as to make as much money in as little time as possible.

So don't expect any new original movie scores for a long time.
 

fncceo

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Covers of the classics rock ...

 

rightwinger

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Old songs now represent 70 percent of the U.S. music market, according to the latest numbers from MRC Data, a music-analytics firm. Those who make a living from new music—especially that endangered species known as the working musician—should look at these figures with fear and trembling. But the news gets worse: The new-music market is actually shrinking. All the growth in the market is coming from old songs.

Is it? Yup. Why? Cuz ours are better. :icon_sjung:

Hey, hey, My, my

Rock and Roll will never die
 

rightwinger

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Rap music has been around for 50 years

But there is no “Classic Rap” or oldies
Seems each new generation just moves on
 

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