How do I get this stain out?

MaggieMae

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Don't know where else to put this, so here goes.

I just bought a pair of EXPENSIVE brown leather clogs. I was so happy to finally find some that were comfortable and didn't look like Minnie Mouse shoes. The only problem was that they squeaked LOUDLY. Wearing them around the house all day didn't help.

So I went online and found all sorts of suggestions for home remedies, and decided to try the one that seemed the least apt to do any damage to the shoes, which was smearing Vaseline petroleum jelly on the inside of the shoe where the seams meet the soles. Well guess what...the GD stuff bled up through to the top of the clogs!!! And there it remains, in plain sight like huge blobs of motor oil has been spilled on the shoes. AARGH!!

Of course now I can't find any answer online as to how to REMOVE stains left by Vaseline on leather. I did find one that wasn't too encouraging: Just hope that it eventually dissipates.

So unless anyone has any suggestions (that won't result in complete destruction of the clogs), I sure would appreciate them. Otherwise, I'm off tomorrow to find someone in that ancient profession of shoe repair to see if they have a fix. I may wind up having them dyed black, which isn't a preferred option.

Thanks, Maggie
 

WillowTree

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Don't know where else to put this, so here goes.

I just bought a pair of EXPENSIVE brown leather clogs. I was so happy to finally find some that were comfortable and didn't look like Minnie Mouse shoes. The only problem was that they squeaked LOUDLY. Wearing them around the house all day didn't help.

So I went online and found all sorts of suggestions for home remedies, and decided to try the one that seemed the least apt to do any damage to the shoes, which was smearing Vaseline petroleum jelly on the inside of the shoe where the seams meet the soles. Well guess what...the GD stuff bled up through to the top of the clogs!!! [/B]And there it remains, in plain sight like huge blobs of motor oil has been spilled on the shoes. AARGH!! Of course now I can't find any answer online as to how to REMOVE stains left by Vaseline on leather. I did find one that wasn't too encouraging: Just hope that it eventually dissipates.

So unless anyone has any suggestions (that won't result in complete destruction of the clogs), I sure would appreciate them. Otherwise, I'm off tomorrow to find someone in that ancient profession of shoe repair to see if they have a fix. I may wind up having them dyed black, which isn't a preferred option.

Thanks, Maggie


Take advantage of the crisis, sue BP and get a new pair of clogs..
 

Big Black Dog

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Well... I can top that. Last night my wife bought a very expensive special floor lamp designed for sewing, quilting and the like. I was unloading the car after we got home and I dropped the damned thing and of course it suddenly became a jig saw puzzle. So, tomorrow we will go back to Rockford and buy another one. So I'm told... Along with lots of other things.:eek:
 

AllieBaba

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I've spent years conditioning boots and saddles.

Rough-out (aka, "suede") on saddles stains, as your clogs did. I would either find a suede conditioner or oil the rest of the shoe as hjmick suggested. It will darken and change the texture of the leather, but I don't think it will damage the leather.

Though I don't use petroleum products on leather.

What you should have done with your squeaky shoes is to put them on and completely soak them in water, then wear them until they're dry.

You should still do that. It should reduce the creakiness, and it will mold the shoe to your foot. It's the way I break in cowboy boots. I used to get them in the summer, then I'd pull them on (without socks, mind you) fill each boot with water or wade in the river, then wear them all day around the place. Beautiful.
 

Sarah G

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Don't know where else to put this, so here goes.

I just bought a pair of EXPENSIVE brown leather clogs. I was so happy to finally find some that were comfortable and didn't look like Minnie Mouse shoes. The only problem was that they squeaked LOUDLY. Wearing them around the house all day didn't help.

So I went online and found all sorts of suggestions for home remedies, and decided to try the one that seemed the least apt to do any damage to the shoes, which was smearing Vaseline petroleum jelly on the inside of the shoe where the seams meet the soles. Well guess what...the GD stuff bled up through to the top of the clogs!!! And there it remains, in plain sight like huge blobs of motor oil has been spilled on the shoes. AARGH!!

Of course now I can't find any answer online as to how to REMOVE stains left by Vaseline on leather. I did find one that wasn't too encouraging: Just hope that it eventually dissipates.

So unless anyone has any suggestions (that won't result in complete destruction of the clogs), I sure would appreciate them. Otherwise, I'm off tomorrow to find someone in that ancient profession of shoe repair to see if they have a fix. I may wind up having them dyed black, which isn't a preferred option.

Thanks, Maggie
You should have just sent them back in the first place.
 
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MaggieMae

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Don't know where else to put this, so here goes.

I just bought a pair of EXPENSIVE brown leather clogs. I was so happy to finally find some that were comfortable and didn't look like Minnie Mouse shoes. The only problem was that they squeaked LOUDLY. Wearing them around the house all day didn't help.

So I went online and found all sorts of suggestions for home remedies, and decided to try the one that seemed the least apt to do any damage to the shoes, which was smearing Vaseline petroleum jelly on the inside of the shoe where the seams meet the soles. Well guess what...the GD stuff bled up through to the top of the clogs!!! [/B]And there it remains, in plain sight like huge blobs of motor oil has been spilled on the shoes. AARGH!! Of course now I can't find any answer online as to how to REMOVE stains left by Vaseline on leather. I did find one that wasn't too encouraging: Just hope that it eventually dissipates.

So unless anyone has any suggestions (that won't result in complete destruction of the clogs), I sure would appreciate them. Otherwise, I'm off tomorrow to find someone in that ancient profession of shoe repair to see if they have a fix. I may wind up having them dyed black, which isn't a preferred option.

Thanks, Maggie


Take advantage of the crisis, sue BP and get a new pair of clogs..


And if I did would I have to give you a percentage because it was your clever idea? Now really, Wiwwo, where would you wear just one clog? Actually, it might cover nicely that point on top of your head.
 
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MaggieMae

MaggieMae

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Smear Vaseline over the rest of the shoe.
I thought of that, but it would still be uneven. The bleed has become a clearly defined blot.
 

Care4all

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Don't know where else to put this, so here goes.

I just bought a pair of EXPENSIVE brown leather clogs. I was so happy to finally find some that were comfortable and didn't look like Minnie Mouse shoes. The only problem was that they squeaked LOUDLY. Wearing them around the house all day didn't help.

So I went online and found all sorts of suggestions for home remedies, and decided to try the one that seemed the least apt to do any damage to the shoes, which was smearing Vaseline petroleum jelly on the inside of the shoe where the seams meet the soles. Well guess what...the GD stuff bled up through to the top of the clogs!!! And there it remains, in plain sight like huge blobs of motor oil has been spilled on the shoes. AARGH!!

Of course now I can't find any answer online as to how to REMOVE stains left by Vaseline on leather. I did find one that wasn't too encouraging: Just hope that it eventually dissipates.

So unless anyone has any suggestions (that won't result in complete destruction of the clogs), I sure would appreciate them. Otherwise, I'm off tomorrow to find someone in that ancient profession of shoe repair to see if they have a fix. I may wind up having them dyed black, which isn't a preferred option.

Thanks, Maggie
3 THINGS/OPTIONS

1-try saddle soap....to remove the oil

2- put the vaseline inside the entire shoe or on top of the leather, so that it soaks in and makes the clog one uniformed color...they may be darker, but won't stand out as the spot did

3- buy a shoe dye kit....when i was young, i was a cheerleader....my high school colors were green and white, the saddle shoes i bought were black and white, we had to dye the black leather to kelly green for our uniform....you would think you could not dye a black leather in to a bright green color....but, the kit comes with a conditioner, that removes the black tanning and oils in the leather so that it took the kelly green color....

try just using the conditioner that removes the oil in leathers....if that does not visibly make it better, then DYE THEM.
 
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MaggieMae

MaggieMae

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I'm hoping some of the cowboys here have a suggestion -- like saddle soap?
 
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MaggieMae

MaggieMae

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Don't know where else to put this, so here goes.

I just bought a pair of EXPENSIVE brown leather clogs. I was so happy to finally find some that were comfortable and didn't look like Minnie Mouse shoes. The only problem was that they squeaked LOUDLY. Wearing them around the house all day didn't help.

So I went online and found all sorts of suggestions for home remedies, and decided to try the one that seemed the least apt to do any damage to the shoes, which was smearing Vaseline petroleum jelly on the inside of the shoe where the seams meet the soles. Well guess what...the GD stuff bled up through to the top of the clogs!!! And there it remains, in plain sight like huge blobs of motor oil has been spilled on the shoes. AARGH!!

Of course now I can't find any answer online as to how to REMOVE stains left by Vaseline on leather. I did find one that wasn't too encouraging: Just hope that it eventually dissipates.

So unless anyone has any suggestions (that won't result in complete destruction of the clogs), I sure would appreciate them. Otherwise, I'm off tomorrow to find someone in that ancient profession of shoe repair to see if they have a fix. I may wind up having them dyed black, which isn't a preferred option.

Thanks, Maggie
3 THINGS/OPTIONS

1-try saddle soap....to remove the oil

2- put the vaseline inside the entire shoe or on top of the leather, so that it soaks in and makes the clog one uniformed color...they may be darker, but won't stand out as the spot did

3- buy a shoe dye kit....when i was young, i was a cheerleader....my high school colors were green and white, the saddle shoes i bought were black and white, we had to dye the black leather to kelly green for our uniform....you would think you could not dye a black leather in to a bright green color....but, the kit comes with a conditioner, that removes the black tanning and oils in the leather so that it took the kelly green color....

try just using the conditioner that removes the oil in leathers....if that does not visibly make it better, then DYE THEM.
Yay! Saddle soap! I just asked about that.
 

Care4all

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Don't know where else to put this, so here goes.

I just bought a pair of EXPENSIVE brown leather clogs. I was so happy to finally find some that were comfortable and didn't look like Minnie Mouse shoes. The only problem was that they squeaked LOUDLY. Wearing them around the house all day didn't help.

So I went online and found all sorts of suggestions for home remedies, and decided to try the one that seemed the least apt to do any damage to the shoes, which was smearing Vaseline petroleum jelly on the inside of the shoe where the seams meet the soles. Well guess what...the GD stuff bled up through to the top of the clogs!!! And there it remains, in plain sight like huge blobs of motor oil has been spilled on the shoes. AARGH!!

Of course now I can't find any answer online as to how to REMOVE stains left by Vaseline on leather. I did find one that wasn't too encouraging: Just hope that it eventually dissipates.

So unless anyone has any suggestions (that won't result in complete destruction of the clogs), I sure would appreciate them. Otherwise, I'm off tomorrow to find someone in that ancient profession of shoe repair to see if they have a fix. I may wind up having them dyed black, which isn't a preferred option.

Thanks, Maggie
3 THINGS/OPTIONS

1-try saddle soap....to remove the oil

2- put the vaseline inside the entire shoe or on top of the leather, so that it soaks in and makes the clog one uniformed color...they may be darker, but won't stand out as the spot did

3- buy a shoe dye kit....when i was young, i was a cheerleader....my high school colors were green and white, the saddle shoes i bought were black and white, we had to dye the black leather to kelly green for our uniform....you would think you could not dye a black leather in to a bright green color....but, the kit comes with a conditioner, that removes the black tanning and oils in the leather so that it took the kelly green color....

try just using the conditioner that removes the oil in leathers....if that does not visibly make it better, then DYE THEM.
Yay! Saddle soap! I just asked about that.
don't hesitate to buy a shoe leather dying kit if the saddle soap does not work....you may have black clogs, but at least they won't be a total waste....

if the saddle soap works...then buy yourself some silicone waterproofing spray for leather, and apply it to your clogs, so you won't have this problem again....the water repellant will repel stains as well.....it is like a Scotch guard for shoe leather.
 

WillowTree

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I've spent years conditioning boots and saddles.

Rough-out (aka, "suede") on saddles stains, as your clogs did. I would either find a suede conditioner or oil the rest of the shoe as hjmick suggested. It will darken and change the texture of the leather, but I don't think it will damage the leather.

Though I don't use petroleum products on leather.

What you should have done with your squeaky shoes is to put them on and completely soak them in water, then wear them until they're dry.

You should still do that. It should reduce the creakiness, and it will mold the shoe to your foot. It's the way I break in cowboy boots. I used to get them in the summer, then I'd pull them on (without socks, mind you) fill each boot with water or wade in the river, then wear them all day around the place. Beautiful.
jeeze didn't yer feets wrinkle all up?
 

WillowTree

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Don't know where else to put this, so here goes.

I just bought a pair of EXPENSIVE brown leather clogs. I was so happy to finally find some that were comfortable and didn't look like Minnie Mouse shoes. The only problem was that they squeaked LOUDLY. Wearing them around the house all day didn't help.

So I went online and found all sorts of suggestions for home remedies, and decided to try the one that seemed the least apt to do any damage to the shoes, which was smearing Vaseline petroleum jelly on the inside of the shoe where the seams meet the soles. Well guess what...the GD stuff bled up through to the top of the clogs!!! [/B]And there it remains, in plain sight like huge blobs of motor oil has been spilled on the shoes. AARGH!! Of course now I can't find any answer online as to how to REMOVE stains left by Vaseline on leather. I did find one that wasn't too encouraging: Just hope that it eventually dissipates.

So unless anyone has any suggestions (that won't result in complete destruction of the clogs), I sure would appreciate them. Otherwise, I'm off tomorrow to find someone in that ancient profession of shoe repair to see if they have a fix. I may wind up having them dyed black, which isn't a preferred option.

Thanks, Maggie


Take advantage of the crisis, sue BP and get a new pair of clogs..


And if I did would I have to give you a percentage because it was your clever idea? Now really, Wiwwo, where would you wear just one clog? Actually, it might cover nicely that point on top of your head.


dew you want a jelly bean?
 

AllieBaba

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I've spent years conditioning boots and saddles.

Rough-out (aka, "suede") on saddles stains, as your clogs did. I would either find a suede conditioner or oil the rest of the shoe as hjmick suggested. It will darken and change the texture of the leather, but I don't think it will damage the leather.

Though I don't use petroleum products on leather.

What you should have done with your squeaky shoes is to put them on and completely soak them in water, then wear them until they're dry.

You should still do that. It should reduce the creakiness, and it will mold the shoe to your foot. It's the way I break in cowboy boots. I used to get them in the summer, then I'd pull them on (without socks, mind you) fill each boot with water or wade in the river, then wear them all day around the place. Beautiful.
jeeze didn't yer feets wrinkle all up?
Leather breathes, so I never had a problem.
I do live in dry climates, though.
 

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