Greenland Ice Shelves Collapsing

Crick

Gold Member
May 10, 2014
29,188
5,669
290
N/A
Little activity had been seen in the North Greenland ice sheets but a new study (at Rapid disintegration and weakening of ice shelves in North Greenland - Nature Communications) finds that they've lost 35% of their total volume since 1978. Just as has been seen in Antarctica, the loss of the ice sheets causes the formerly bottlenecked glaciers to radically accelerate their slide into the ocean.


"Until now, not much melting has been observed in Greenland's north, and scientists believed the ice there was relatively stable. To investigate further, the researchers fed a combination of satellite and field observations into a climate model. Their results revealed a chilling picture: Rising ocean temperatures had caused the ice shelves holding back North Greenland's glaciers to lose more than 35% of their total volume since 1978. Most of the loss was driven by warm water melting the ice shelves from underneath, while calving events — where blocks of ice break away from the shelf as icebergs — also contributed to the reduction. And if oceans continue to warm, the shelves could be pushed into a dramatic collapse, the researchers said."
 
Little activity had been seen in the North Greenland ice sheets but a new study (at Rapid disintegration and weakening of ice shelves in North Greenland - Nature Communications) finds that they've lost 35% of their total volume since 1978. Just as has been seen in Antarctica, the loss of the ice sheets causes the formerly bottlenecked glaciers to radically accelerate their slide into the ocean.


"Until now, not much melting has been observed in Greenland's north, and scientists believed the ice there was relatively stable. To investigate further, the researchers fed a combination of satellite and field observations into a climate model. Their results revealed a chilling picture: Rising ocean temperatures had caused the ice shelves holding back North Greenland's glaciers to lose more than 35% of their total volume since 1978. Most of the loss was driven by warm water melting the ice shelves from underneath, while calving events — where blocks of ice break away from the shelf as icebergs — also contributed to the reduction. And if oceans continue to warm, the shelves could be pushed into a dramatic collapse, the researchers said."
So typical interglacial period behavior?
 
Little activity had been seen in the North Greenland ice sheets but a new study (at Rapid disintegration and weakening of ice shelves in North Greenland - Nature Communications) finds that they've lost 35% of their total volume since 1978. Just as has been seen in Antarctica, the loss of the ice sheets causes the formerly bottlenecked glaciers to radically accelerate their slide into the ocean.


"Until now, not much melting has been observed in Greenland's north, and scientists believed the ice there was relatively stable. To investigate further, the researchers fed a combination of satellite and field observations into a climate model. Their results revealed a chilling picture: Rising ocean temperatures had caused the ice shelves holding back North Greenland's glaciers to lose more than 35% of their total volume since 1978. Most of the loss was driven by warm water melting the ice shelves from underneath, while calving events — where blocks of ice break away from the shelf as icebergs — also contributed to the reduction. And if oceans continue to warm, the shelves could be pushed into a dramatic collapse, the researchers said."
kermit-panic.gif
 
Little activity had been seen in the North Greenland ice sheets but a new study (at Rapid disintegration and weakening of ice shelves in North Greenland - Nature Communications) finds that they've lost 35% of their total volume since 1978. Just as has been seen in Antarctica, the loss of the ice sheets causes the formerly bottlenecked glaciers to radically accelerate their slide into the ocean.


"Until now, not much melting has been observed in Greenland's north, and scientists believed the ice there was relatively stable. To investigate further, the researchers fed a combination of satellite and field observations into a climate model. Their results revealed a chilling picture: Rising ocean temperatures had caused the ice shelves holding back North Greenland's glaciers to lose more than 35% of their total volume since 1978. Most of the loss was driven by warm water melting the ice shelves from underneath, while calving events — where blocks of ice break away from the shelf as icebergs — also contributed to the reduction. And if oceans continue to warm, the shelves could be pushed into a dramatic collapse, the researchers said."
So we're not in an Ice Age right now like the climate scientists were prediciting back then, amirite? :D
 
Little activity had been seen in the North Greenland ice sheets but a new study (at Rapid disintegration and weakening of ice shelves in North Greenland - Nature Communications) finds that they've lost 35% of their total volume since 1978. Just as has been seen in Antarctica, the loss of the ice sheets causes the formerly bottlenecked glaciers to radically accelerate their slide into the ocean.


"Until now, not much melting has been observed in Greenland's north, and scientists believed the ice there was relatively stable. To investigate further, the researchers fed a combination of satellite and field observations into a climate model. Their results revealed a chilling picture: Rising ocean temperatures had caused the ice shelves holding back North Greenland's glaciers to lose more than 35% of their total volume since 1978. Most of the loss was driven by warm water melting the ice shelves from underneath, while calving events — where blocks of ice break away from the shelf as icebergs — also contributed to the reduction. And if oceans continue to warm, the shelves could be pushed into a dramatic collapse, the researchers said."

China must totally shut down their CO2 emissions. Greenland should declare war on China over this
 
Little activity had been seen in the North Greenland ice sheets but a new study (at Rapid disintegration and weakening of ice shelves in North Greenland - Nature Communications) finds that they've lost 35% of their total volume since 1978. Just as has been seen in Antarctica, the loss of the ice sheets causes the formerly bottlenecked glaciers to radically accelerate their slide into the ocean.


"Until now, not much melting has been observed in Greenland's north, and scientists believed the ice there was relatively stable. To investigate further, the researchers fed a combination of satellite and field observations into a climate model. Their results revealed a chilling picture: Rising ocean temperatures had caused the ice shelves holding back North Greenland's glaciers to lose more than 35% of their total volume since 1978. Most of the loss was driven by warm water melting the ice shelves from underneath, while calving events — where blocks of ice break away from the shelf as icebergs — also contributed to the reduction. And if oceans continue to warm, the shelves could be pushed into a dramatic collapse, the researchers said."

1699504379510.png
 
Are they collapsed, they should be. I remember when a stack of cards I was playing with collapsed. It took a split second.

Anyhow, I see no flooding reports, no ocean rising report.

The collapse of ice sheets have zero effect
 
sure, but they should all be gone now, unless it happens in slow motion
the prophet of AGW, the great algore, said that by now all of florida and much of the east coast would be under water and there would be no ice at either pole----------he lied and the idiots on the left believed him and sent him their money.
 

Forum List

Back
Top