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The following are my beliefs which in part come from my faith. I believe God created the material world and everything in it. Please feel free to discuss.

God himself created the visible world in all its richness, diversity and order. Scripture presents the work of the Creator symbolically as a succession of six days of divine "work", concluded by the "rest" of the seventh day. On the subject of creation, the sacred text teaches the truths revealed by God for our salvation, permitting us to recognize the inner nature, the value and the ordering of the whole of creation to the praise of God.

I believe that Nothing exists that does not owe its existence to God the Creator. The world began when God's word drew it out of nothingness; all existent beings, all of nature, and all human history are rooted in this primordial event, the very genesis by which the world was constituted and time begun.

I believe that each creature possesses its own particular goodness and perfection. For each one of the works of the "six days" it is said: "And God saw that it was good." By the very nature of creation, material being is endowed with its own stability, truth and excellence, its own order and laws. Each of the various creatures, willed in its own being, reflects in its own way a ray of God's infinite wisdom and goodness. Man must therefore respect the particular goodness of every creature, to avoid any disordered use of things which would be in contempt of the Creator and would bring disastrous consequences for human beings and their environment.

I believe that God wills the interdependence of creatures. The spectacle of their countless diversities and inequalities tells us that no creature is self-sufficient. Creatures exist only in dependence on each other, to complete each other, in the service of each other.

I see the beauty of the universe. The order and harmony of the created world results from the diversity of beings and from the relationships which exist among them. Man discovers them progressively as the laws of nature. They call forth the admiration of scholars. The beauty of creation reflects the infinite beauty of the Creator and ought to inspire the respect and submission of man's intellect and will.

I believe the hierarchy of creatures is expressed by the order of the "six days", from the less perfect to the more perfect. God loves all his creatures and takes care of each one. Nevertheless, Jesus said: "You are of more value than many sparrows", or again: "Of how much more value is a man than a sheep!"

I believe that man is the summit of the Creator's work, as the inspired account expresses by clearly distinguishing the creation of man from that of the other creatures.

I believe there is a solidarity among all creatures arising from the fact that all have the same Creator and are all ordered to his glory.


Paraphrased and excerpted from the Catechism of the Catholic Church

 

Taz

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The following are my beliefs which in part come from my faith. I believe God created the material world and everything in it. Please feel free to discuss.

God himself created the visible world in all its richness, diversity and order. Scripture presents the work of the Creator symbolically as a succession of six days of divine "work", concluded by the "rest" of the seventh day. On the subject of creation, the sacred text teaches the truths revealed by God for our salvation, permitting us to recognize the inner nature, the value and the ordering of the whole of creation to the praise of God.

I believe that Nothing exists that does not owe its existence to God the Creator. The world began when God's word drew it out of nothingness; all existent beings, all of nature, and all human history are rooted in this primordial event, the very genesis by which the world was constituted and time begun.

I believe that each creature possesses its own particular goodness and perfection. For each one of the works of the "six days" it is said: "And God saw that it was good." By the very nature of creation, material being is endowed with its own stability, truth and excellence, its own order and laws. Each of the various creatures, willed in its own being, reflects in its own way a ray of God's infinite wisdom and goodness. Man must therefore respect the particular goodness of every creature, to avoid any disordered use of things which would be in contempt of the Creator and would bring disastrous consequences for human beings and their environment.

I believe that God wills the interdependence of creatures. The spectacle of their countless diversities and inequalities tells us that no creature is self-sufficient. Creatures exist only in dependence on each other, to complete each other, in the service of each other.

I see the beauty of the universe. The order and harmony of the created world results from the diversity of beings and from the relationships which exist among them. Man discovers them progressively as the laws of nature. They call forth the admiration of scholars. The beauty of creation reflects the infinite beauty of the Creator and ought to inspire the respect and submission of man's intellect and will.

I believe the hierarchy of creatures is expressed by the order of the "six days", from the less perfect to the more perfect. God loves all his creatures and takes care of each one. Nevertheless, Jesus said: "You are of more value than many sparrows", or again: "Of how much more value is a man than a sheep!"

I believe that man is the summit of the Creator's work, as the inspired account expresses by clearly distinguishing the creation of man from that of the other creatures.

I believe there is a solidarity among all creatures arising from the fact that all have the same Creator and are all ordered to his glory.


Paraphrased and excerpted from the Catechism of the Catholic Church

"I believe that Nothing exists that does not owe its existence to God the Creator." So parents of deformed and retarded babies now know what happened, it was god who made their baby like that.
 

BULLDOG

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Lots of people believe lots of different things. Steve Martin said he believes a woman should be on a pedestal just high enough to look up her dress.
I believe you can't say where God came from.
 

Taz

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The following are my beliefs which in part come from my faith. I believe God created the material world and everything in it. Please feel free to discuss.

God himself created the visible world in all its richness, diversity and order. Scripture presents the work of the Creator symbolically as a succession of six days of divine "work", concluded by the "rest" of the seventh day. On the subject of creation, the sacred text teaches the truths revealed by God for our salvation, permitting us to recognize the inner nature, the value and the ordering of the whole of creation to the praise of God.

I believe that Nothing exists that does not owe its existence to God the Creator. The world began when God's word drew it out of nothingness; all existent beings, all of nature, and all human history are rooted in this primordial event, the very genesis by which the world was constituted and time begun.

I believe that each creature possesses its own particular goodness and perfection. For each one of the works of the "six days" it is said: "And God saw that it was good." By the very nature of creation, material being is endowed with its own stability, truth and excellence, its own order and laws. Each of the various creatures, willed in its own being, reflects in its own way a ray of God's infinite wisdom and goodness. Man must therefore respect the particular goodness of every creature, to avoid any disordered use of things which would be in contempt of the Creator and would bring disastrous consequences for human beings and their environment.

I believe that God wills the interdependence of creatures. The spectacle of their countless diversities and inequalities tells us that no creature is self-sufficient. Creatures exist only in dependence on each other, to complete each other, in the service of each other.

I see the beauty of the universe. The order and harmony of the created world results from the diversity of beings and from the relationships which exist among them. Man discovers them progressively as the laws of nature. They call forth the admiration of scholars. The beauty of creation reflects the infinite beauty of the Creator and ought to inspire the respect and submission of man's intellect and will.

I believe the hierarchy of creatures is expressed by the order of the "six days", from the less perfect to the more perfect. God loves all his creatures and takes care of each one. Nevertheless, Jesus said: "You are of more value than many sparrows", or again: "Of how much more value is a man than a sheep!"

I believe that man is the summit of the Creator's work, as the inspired account expresses by clearly distinguishing the creation of man from that of the other creatures.

I believe there is a solidarity among all creatures arising from the fact that all have the same Creator and are all ordered to his glory.


Paraphrased and excerpted from the Catechism of the Catholic Church

"I believe that man is the summit of the Creator's work". Does that include Josef Mengele?
 

OldFlame

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The following are my beliefs which in part come from my faith. I believe God created the material world and everything in it. Please feel free to discuss.

God himself created the visible world in all its richness, diversity and order. Scripture presents the work of the Creator symbolically as a succession of six days of divine "work", concluded by the "rest" of the seventh day. On the subject of creation, the sacred text teaches the truths revealed by God for our salvation, permitting us to recognize the inner nature, the value and the ordering of the whole of creation to the praise of God.

I believe that Nothing exists that does not owe its existence to God the Creator. The world began when God's word drew it out of nothingness; all existent beings, all of nature, and all human history are rooted in this primordial event, the very genesis by which the world was constituted and time begun.

I believe that each creature possesses its own particular goodness and perfection. For each one of the works of the "six days" it is said: "And God saw that it was good." By the very nature of creation, material being is endowed with its own stability, truth and excellence, its own order and laws. Each of the various creatures, willed in its own being, reflects in its own way a ray of God's infinite wisdom and goodness. Man must therefore respect the particular goodness of every creature, to avoid any disordered use of things which would be in contempt of the Creator and would bring disastrous consequences for human beings and their environment.

I believe that God wills the interdependence of creatures. The spectacle of their countless diversities and inequalities tells us that no creature is self-sufficient. Creatures exist only in dependence on each other, to complete each other, in the service of each other.

I see the beauty of the universe. The order and harmony of the created world results from the diversity of beings and from the relationships which exist among them. Man discovers them progressively as the laws of nature. They call forth the admiration of scholars. The beauty of creation reflects the infinite beauty of the Creator and ought to inspire the respect and submission of man's intellect and will.

I believe the hierarchy of creatures is expressed by the order of the "six days", from the less perfect to the more perfect. God loves all his creatures and takes care of each one. Nevertheless, Jesus said: "You are of more value than many sparrows", or again: "Of how much more value is a man than a sheep!"

I believe that man is the summit of the Creator's work, as the inspired account expresses by clearly distinguishing the creation of man from that of the other creatures.

I believe there is a solidarity among all creatures arising from the fact that all have the same Creator and are all ordered to his glory.


Paraphrased and excerpted from the Catechism of the Catholic Church

"I believe that Nothing exists that does not owe its existence to God the Creator." So parents of deformed and retarded babies now know what happened, it was god who made their baby like that.
They may be 'deformed' in your eyes, but not in God's. Do those parents still love their child? Can that love ultimately inspire or bring other good into the world?
 

Taz

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The following are my beliefs which in part come from my faith. I believe God created the material world and everything in it. Please feel free to discuss.

God himself created the visible world in all its richness, diversity and order. Scripture presents the work of the Creator symbolically as a succession of six days of divine "work", concluded by the "rest" of the seventh day. On the subject of creation, the sacred text teaches the truths revealed by God for our salvation, permitting us to recognize the inner nature, the value and the ordering of the whole of creation to the praise of God.

I believe that Nothing exists that does not owe its existence to God the Creator. The world began when God's word drew it out of nothingness; all existent beings, all of nature, and all human history are rooted in this primordial event, the very genesis by which the world was constituted and time begun.

I believe that each creature possesses its own particular goodness and perfection. For each one of the works of the "six days" it is said: "And God saw that it was good." By the very nature of creation, material being is endowed with its own stability, truth and excellence, its own order and laws. Each of the various creatures, willed in its own being, reflects in its own way a ray of God's infinite wisdom and goodness. Man must therefore respect the particular goodness of every creature, to avoid any disordered use of things which would be in contempt of the Creator and would bring disastrous consequences for human beings and their environment.

I believe that God wills the interdependence of creatures. The spectacle of their countless diversities and inequalities tells us that no creature is self-sufficient. Creatures exist only in dependence on each other, to complete each other, in the service of each other.

I see the beauty of the universe. The order and harmony of the created world results from the diversity of beings and from the relationships which exist among them. Man discovers them progressively as the laws of nature. They call forth the admiration of scholars. The beauty of creation reflects the infinite beauty of the Creator and ought to inspire the respect and submission of man's intellect and will.

I believe the hierarchy of creatures is expressed by the order of the "six days", from the less perfect to the more perfect. God loves all his creatures and takes care of each one. Nevertheless, Jesus said: "You are of more value than many sparrows", or again: "Of how much more value is a man than a sheep!"

I believe that man is the summit of the Creator's work, as the inspired account expresses by clearly distinguishing the creation of man from that of the other creatures.

I believe there is a solidarity among all creatures arising from the fact that all have the same Creator and are all ordered to his glory.


Paraphrased and excerpted from the Catechism of the Catholic Church

"I believe that Nothing exists that does not owe its existence to God the Creator." So parents of deformed and retarded babies now know what happened, it was god who made their baby like that.
They may be 'deformed' in your eyes, but not in God's. Do those parents still love their child? Can that love ultimately inspire or bring other good into the world?
That's a cop out. Some kids live a short life in constant pain, or die of cancer... Don't give me any bs about how good that is. I have a friend whose son didn't survive past 2 because of a deformed heart. His own heart aches all the time.
 

OldFlame

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It's not a cop out, there are all kinds of terrible things that happen to both adults and children, that doesn't mean that their lives were meaningless or not worth having. Would your friend have given up having had his son, knowing him or loving him because of the short time he had him here? Probably not... And if you believe in the Christian faith then the time spent here is very short, and the rewards too many to count once we leave here.
 
OP
ding

ding

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The following are my beliefs which in part come from my faith. I believe God created the material world and everything in it. Please feel free to discuss.

God himself created the visible world in all its richness, diversity and order. Scripture presents the work of the Creator symbolically as a succession of six days of divine "work", concluded by the "rest" of the seventh day. On the subject of creation, the sacred text teaches the truths revealed by God for our salvation, permitting us to recognize the inner nature, the value and the ordering of the whole of creation to the praise of God.

I believe that Nothing exists that does not owe its existence to God the Creator. The world began when God's word drew it out of nothingness; all existent beings, all of nature, and all human history are rooted in this primordial event, the very genesis by which the world was constituted and time begun.

I believe that each creature possesses its own particular goodness and perfection. For each one of the works of the "six days" it is said: "And God saw that it was good." By the very nature of creation, material being is endowed with its own stability, truth and excellence, its own order and laws. Each of the various creatures, willed in its own being, reflects in its own way a ray of God's infinite wisdom and goodness. Man must therefore respect the particular goodness of every creature, to avoid any disordered use of things which would be in contempt of the Creator and would bring disastrous consequences for human beings and their environment.

I believe that God wills the interdependence of creatures. The spectacle of their countless diversities and inequalities tells us that no creature is self-sufficient. Creatures exist only in dependence on each other, to complete each other, in the service of each other.

I see the beauty of the universe. The order and harmony of the created world results from the diversity of beings and from the relationships which exist among them. Man discovers them progressively as the laws of nature. They call forth the admiration of scholars. The beauty of creation reflects the infinite beauty of the Creator and ought to inspire the respect and submission of man's intellect and will.

I believe the hierarchy of creatures is expressed by the order of the "six days", from the less perfect to the more perfect. God loves all his creatures and takes care of each one. Nevertheless, Jesus said: "You are of more value than many sparrows", or again: "Of how much more value is a man than a sheep!"

I believe that man is the summit of the Creator's work, as the inspired account expresses by clearly distinguishing the creation of man from that of the other creatures.

I believe there is a solidarity among all creatures arising from the fact that all have the same Creator and are all ordered to his glory.


Paraphrased and excerpted from the Catechism of the Catholic Church

"I believe that Nothing exists that does not owe its existence to God the Creator." So parents of deformed and retarded babies now know what happened, it was god who made their baby like that.
If that's how you want to see it, sure, Taz. Of course I see it like with infinite power God could always create something better. But with infinite wisdom and goodness God freely willed to create a world "in a state of journeying" towards its ultimate perfection. In God's plan this process of becoming involves the appearance of certain beings and the disappearance of others, the existence of the more perfect alongside the less perfect, both constructive and destructive forces of nature. For almighty God. . ., because he is supremely good, would never allow anything bad to exist in his works if he were not so all-powerful and good as to cause good to emerge from it.
 
OP
ding

ding

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The following are my beliefs which in part come from my faith. I believe God created the material world and everything in it. Please feel free to discuss.

God himself created the visible world in all its richness, diversity and order. Scripture presents the work of the Creator symbolically as a succession of six days of divine "work", concluded by the "rest" of the seventh day. On the subject of creation, the sacred text teaches the truths revealed by God for our salvation, permitting us to recognize the inner nature, the value and the ordering of the whole of creation to the praise of God.

I believe that Nothing exists that does not owe its existence to God the Creator. The world began when God's word drew it out of nothingness; all existent beings, all of nature, and all human history are rooted in this primordial event, the very genesis by which the world was constituted and time begun.

I believe that each creature possesses its own particular goodness and perfection. For each one of the works of the "six days" it is said: "And God saw that it was good." By the very nature of creation, material being is endowed with its own stability, truth and excellence, its own order and laws. Each of the various creatures, willed in its own being, reflects in its own way a ray of God's infinite wisdom and goodness. Man must therefore respect the particular goodness of every creature, to avoid any disordered use of things which would be in contempt of the Creator and would bring disastrous consequences for human beings and their environment.

I believe that God wills the interdependence of creatures. The spectacle of their countless diversities and inequalities tells us that no creature is self-sufficient. Creatures exist only in dependence on each other, to complete each other, in the service of each other.

I see the beauty of the universe. The order and harmony of the created world results from the diversity of beings and from the relationships which exist among them. Man discovers them progressively as the laws of nature. They call forth the admiration of scholars. The beauty of creation reflects the infinite beauty of the Creator and ought to inspire the respect and submission of man's intellect and will.

I believe the hierarchy of creatures is expressed by the order of the "six days", from the less perfect to the more perfect. God loves all his creatures and takes care of each one. Nevertheless, Jesus said: "You are of more value than many sparrows", or again: "Of how much more value is a man than a sheep!"

I believe that man is the summit of the Creator's work, as the inspired account expresses by clearly distinguishing the creation of man from that of the other creatures.

I believe there is a solidarity among all creatures arising from the fact that all have the same Creator and are all ordered to his glory.


Paraphrased and excerpted from the Catechism of the Catholic Church

"I believe that man is the summit of the Creator's work". Does that include Josef Mengele?
Sure and you too. ;)

What you intend for evil, God is using for good.
 
OP
ding

ding

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It's not a cop out, there are all kinds of terrible things that happen to both adults and children, that doesn't mean that their lives were meaningless or not worth having. Would your friend have given up having had his son, knowing him or loving him because of the short time he had him here? Probably not... And if you believe in the Christian faith then the time spent here is very short, and the rewards too many to count once we leave here.
Reason and experience confirm my faith that everything works for good.
 

Taz

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The following are my beliefs which in part come from my faith. I believe God created the material world and everything in it. Please feel free to discuss.

God himself created the visible world in all its richness, diversity and order. Scripture presents the work of the Creator symbolically as a succession of six days of divine "work", concluded by the "rest" of the seventh day. On the subject of creation, the sacred text teaches the truths revealed by God for our salvation, permitting us to recognize the inner nature, the value and the ordering of the whole of creation to the praise of God.

I believe that Nothing exists that does not owe its existence to God the Creator. The world began when God's word drew it out of nothingness; all existent beings, all of nature, and all human history are rooted in this primordial event, the very genesis by which the world was constituted and time begun.

I believe that each creature possesses its own particular goodness and perfection. For each one of the works of the "six days" it is said: "And God saw that it was good." By the very nature of creation, material being is endowed with its own stability, truth and excellence, its own order and laws. Each of the various creatures, willed in its own being, reflects in its own way a ray of God's infinite wisdom and goodness. Man must therefore respect the particular goodness of every creature, to avoid any disordered use of things which would be in contempt of the Creator and would bring disastrous consequences for human beings and their environment.

I believe that God wills the interdependence of creatures. The spectacle of their countless diversities and inequalities tells us that no creature is self-sufficient. Creatures exist only in dependence on each other, to complete each other, in the service of each other.

I see the beauty of the universe. The order and harmony of the created world results from the diversity of beings and from the relationships which exist among them. Man discovers them progressively as the laws of nature. They call forth the admiration of scholars. The beauty of creation reflects the infinite beauty of the Creator and ought to inspire the respect and submission of man's intellect and will.

I believe the hierarchy of creatures is expressed by the order of the "six days", from the less perfect to the more perfect. God loves all his creatures and takes care of each one. Nevertheless, Jesus said: "You are of more value than many sparrows", or again: "Of how much more value is a man than a sheep!"

I believe that man is the summit of the Creator's work, as the inspired account expresses by clearly distinguishing the creation of man from that of the other creatures.

I believe there is a solidarity among all creatures arising from the fact that all have the same Creator and are all ordered to his glory.


Paraphrased and excerpted from the Catechism of the Catholic Church

"I believe that Nothing exists that does not owe its existence to God the Creator." So parents of deformed and retarded babies now know what happened, it was god who made their baby like that.
If that's how you want to see it, sure, Taz. Of course I see it like with infinite power God could always create something better. But with infinite wisdom and goodness God freely willed to create a world "in a state of journeying" towards its ultimate perfection. In God's plan this process of becoming involves the appearance of certain beings and the disappearance of others, the existence of the more perfect alongside the less perfect, both constructive and destructive forces of nature. For almighty God. . ., because he is supremely good, would never allow anything bad to exist in his works if he were not so all-powerful and good as to cause good to emerge from it.
How do you know that it's "in a state of journeying" towards its ultimate perfection.
 

Taz

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The following are my beliefs which in part come from my faith. I believe God created the material world and everything in it. Please feel free to discuss.

God himself created the visible world in all its richness, diversity and order. Scripture presents the work of the Creator symbolically as a succession of six days of divine "work", concluded by the "rest" of the seventh day. On the subject of creation, the sacred text teaches the truths revealed by God for our salvation, permitting us to recognize the inner nature, the value and the ordering of the whole of creation to the praise of God.

I believe that Nothing exists that does not owe its existence to God the Creator. The world began when God's word drew it out of nothingness; all existent beings, all of nature, and all human history are rooted in this primordial event, the very genesis by which the world was constituted and time begun.

I believe that each creature possesses its own particular goodness and perfection. For each one of the works of the "six days" it is said: "And God saw that it was good." By the very nature of creation, material being is endowed with its own stability, truth and excellence, its own order and laws. Each of the various creatures, willed in its own being, reflects in its own way a ray of God's infinite wisdom and goodness. Man must therefore respect the particular goodness of every creature, to avoid any disordered use of things which would be in contempt of the Creator and would bring disastrous consequences for human beings and their environment.

I believe that God wills the interdependence of creatures. The spectacle of their countless diversities and inequalities tells us that no creature is self-sufficient. Creatures exist only in dependence on each other, to complete each other, in the service of each other.

I see the beauty of the universe. The order and harmony of the created world results from the diversity of beings and from the relationships which exist among them. Man discovers them progressively as the laws of nature. They call forth the admiration of scholars. The beauty of creation reflects the infinite beauty of the Creator and ought to inspire the respect and submission of man's intellect and will.

I believe the hierarchy of creatures is expressed by the order of the "six days", from the less perfect to the more perfect. God loves all his creatures and takes care of each one. Nevertheless, Jesus said: "You are of more value than many sparrows", or again: "Of how much more value is a man than a sheep!"

I believe that man is the summit of the Creator's work, as the inspired account expresses by clearly distinguishing the creation of man from that of the other creatures.

I believe there is a solidarity among all creatures arising from the fact that all have the same Creator and are all ordered to his glory.


Paraphrased and excerpted from the Catechism of the Catholic Church

"I believe that man is the summit of the Creator's work". Does that include Josef Mengele?
Sure and you too. ;)

What you intend for evil, God is using for good.
So god was using Mengele for good? :cuckoo:
 
OP
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The following are my beliefs which in part come from my faith. I believe God created the material world and everything in it. Please feel free to discuss.

God himself created the visible world in all its richness, diversity and order. Scripture presents the work of the Creator symbolically as a succession of six days of divine "work", concluded by the "rest" of the seventh day. On the subject of creation, the sacred text teaches the truths revealed by God for our salvation, permitting us to recognize the inner nature, the value and the ordering of the whole of creation to the praise of God.

I believe that Nothing exists that does not owe its existence to God the Creator. The world began when God's word drew it out of nothingness; all existent beings, all of nature, and all human history are rooted in this primordial event, the very genesis by which the world was constituted and time begun.

I believe that each creature possesses its own particular goodness and perfection. For each one of the works of the "six days" it is said: "And God saw that it was good." By the very nature of creation, material being is endowed with its own stability, truth and excellence, its own order and laws. Each of the various creatures, willed in its own being, reflects in its own way a ray of God's infinite wisdom and goodness. Man must therefore respect the particular goodness of every creature, to avoid any disordered use of things which would be in contempt of the Creator and would bring disastrous consequences for human beings and their environment.

I believe that God wills the interdependence of creatures. The spectacle of their countless diversities and inequalities tells us that no creature is self-sufficient. Creatures exist only in dependence on each other, to complete each other, in the service of each other.

I see the beauty of the universe. The order and harmony of the created world results from the diversity of beings and from the relationships which exist among them. Man discovers them progressively as the laws of nature. They call forth the admiration of scholars. The beauty of creation reflects the infinite beauty of the Creator and ought to inspire the respect and submission of man's intellect and will.

I believe the hierarchy of creatures is expressed by the order of the "six days", from the less perfect to the more perfect. God loves all his creatures and takes care of each one. Nevertheless, Jesus said: "You are of more value than many sparrows", or again: "Of how much more value is a man than a sheep!"

I believe that man is the summit of the Creator's work, as the inspired account expresses by clearly distinguishing the creation of man from that of the other creatures.

I believe there is a solidarity among all creatures arising from the fact that all have the same Creator and are all ordered to his glory.


Paraphrased and excerpted from the Catechism of the Catholic Church

"I believe that Nothing exists that does not owe its existence to God the Creator." So parents of deformed and retarded babies now know what happened, it was god who made their baby like that.
If that's how you want to see it, sure, Taz. Of course I see it like with infinite power God could always create something better. But with infinite wisdom and goodness God freely willed to create a world "in a state of journeying" towards its ultimate perfection. In God's plan this process of becoming involves the appearance of certain beings and the disappearance of others, the existence of the more perfect alongside the less perfect, both constructive and destructive forces of nature. For almighty God. . ., because he is supremely good, would never allow anything bad to exist in his works if he were not so all-powerful and good as to cause good to emerge from it.
How do you know that it's "in a state of journeying" towards its ultimate perfection.
How can you not?
 
OP
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The following are my beliefs which in part come from my faith. I believe God created the material world and everything in it. Please feel free to discuss.

God himself created the visible world in all its richness, diversity and order. Scripture presents the work of the Creator symbolically as a succession of six days of divine "work", concluded by the "rest" of the seventh day. On the subject of creation, the sacred text teaches the truths revealed by God for our salvation, permitting us to recognize the inner nature, the value and the ordering of the whole of creation to the praise of God.

I believe that Nothing exists that does not owe its existence to God the Creator. The world began when God's word drew it out of nothingness; all existent beings, all of nature, and all human history are rooted in this primordial event, the very genesis by which the world was constituted and time begun.

I believe that each creature possesses its own particular goodness and perfection. For each one of the works of the "six days" it is said: "And God saw that it was good." By the very nature of creation, material being is endowed with its own stability, truth and excellence, its own order and laws. Each of the various creatures, willed in its own being, reflects in its own way a ray of God's infinite wisdom and goodness. Man must therefore respect the particular goodness of every creature, to avoid any disordered use of things which would be in contempt of the Creator and would bring disastrous consequences for human beings and their environment.

I believe that God wills the interdependence of creatures. The spectacle of their countless diversities and inequalities tells us that no creature is self-sufficient. Creatures exist only in dependence on each other, to complete each other, in the service of each other.

I see the beauty of the universe. The order and harmony of the created world results from the diversity of beings and from the relationships which exist among them. Man discovers them progressively as the laws of nature. They call forth the admiration of scholars. The beauty of creation reflects the infinite beauty of the Creator and ought to inspire the respect and submission of man's intellect and will.

I believe the hierarchy of creatures is expressed by the order of the "six days", from the less perfect to the more perfect. God loves all his creatures and takes care of each one. Nevertheless, Jesus said: "You are of more value than many sparrows", or again: "Of how much more value is a man than a sheep!"

I believe that man is the summit of the Creator's work, as the inspired account expresses by clearly distinguishing the creation of man from that of the other creatures.

I believe there is a solidarity among all creatures arising from the fact that all have the same Creator and are all ordered to his glory.


Paraphrased and excerpted from the Catechism of the Catholic Church

"I believe that man is the summit of the Creator's work". Does that include Josef Mengele?
Sure and you too. ;)

What you intend for evil, God is using for good.
So god was using Mengele for good? :cuckoo:
If that's how you want to see it, but then of course you would have to see it that God is using you for good too.
 

Taz

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The following are my beliefs which in part come from my faith. I believe God created the material world and everything in it. Please feel free to discuss.

God himself created the visible world in all its richness, diversity and order. Scripture presents the work of the Creator symbolically as a succession of six days of divine "work", concluded by the "rest" of the seventh day. On the subject of creation, the sacred text teaches the truths revealed by God for our salvation, permitting us to recognize the inner nature, the value and the ordering of the whole of creation to the praise of God.

I believe that Nothing exists that does not owe its existence to God the Creator. The world began when God's word drew it out of nothingness; all existent beings, all of nature, and all human history are rooted in this primordial event, the very genesis by which the world was constituted and time begun.

I believe that each creature possesses its own particular goodness and perfection. For each one of the works of the "six days" it is said: "And God saw that it was good." By the very nature of creation, material being is endowed with its own stability, truth and excellence, its own order and laws. Each of the various creatures, willed in its own being, reflects in its own way a ray of God's infinite wisdom and goodness. Man must therefore respect the particular goodness of every creature, to avoid any disordered use of things which would be in contempt of the Creator and would bring disastrous consequences for human beings and their environment.

I believe that God wills the interdependence of creatures. The spectacle of their countless diversities and inequalities tells us that no creature is self-sufficient. Creatures exist only in dependence on each other, to complete each other, in the service of each other.

I see the beauty of the universe. The order and harmony of the created world results from the diversity of beings and from the relationships which exist among them. Man discovers them progressively as the laws of nature. They call forth the admiration of scholars. The beauty of creation reflects the infinite beauty of the Creator and ought to inspire the respect and submission of man's intellect and will.

I believe the hierarchy of creatures is expressed by the order of the "six days", from the less perfect to the more perfect. God loves all his creatures and takes care of each one. Nevertheless, Jesus said: "You are of more value than many sparrows", or again: "Of how much more value is a man than a sheep!"

I believe that man is the summit of the Creator's work, as the inspired account expresses by clearly distinguishing the creation of man from that of the other creatures.

I believe there is a solidarity among all creatures arising from the fact that all have the same Creator and are all ordered to his glory.


Paraphrased and excerpted from the Catechism of the Catholic Church

"I believe that Nothing exists that does not owe its existence to God the Creator." So parents of deformed and retarded babies now know what happened, it was god who made their baby like that.
If that's how you want to see it, sure, Taz. Of course I see it like with infinite power God could always create something better. But with infinite wisdom and goodness God freely willed to create a world "in a state of journeying" towards its ultimate perfection. In God's plan this process of becoming involves the appearance of certain beings and the disappearance of others, the existence of the more perfect alongside the less perfect, both constructive and destructive forces of nature. For almighty God. . ., because he is supremely good, would never allow anything bad to exist in his works if he were not so all-powerful and good as to cause good to emerge from it.
How do you know that it's "in a state of journeying" towards its ultimate perfection.
How can you not?
That's not proof, c'mon, give it a little effort.
 

Taz

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The following are my beliefs which in part come from my faith. I believe God created the material world and everything in it. Please feel free to discuss.

God himself created the visible world in all its richness, diversity and order. Scripture presents the work of the Creator symbolically as a succession of six days of divine "work", concluded by the "rest" of the seventh day. On the subject of creation, the sacred text teaches the truths revealed by God for our salvation, permitting us to recognize the inner nature, the value and the ordering of the whole of creation to the praise of God.

I believe that Nothing exists that does not owe its existence to God the Creator. The world began when God's word drew it out of nothingness; all existent beings, all of nature, and all human history are rooted in this primordial event, the very genesis by which the world was constituted and time begun.

I believe that each creature possesses its own particular goodness and perfection. For each one of the works of the "six days" it is said: "And God saw that it was good." By the very nature of creation, material being is endowed with its own stability, truth and excellence, its own order and laws. Each of the various creatures, willed in its own being, reflects in its own way a ray of God's infinite wisdom and goodness. Man must therefore respect the particular goodness of every creature, to avoid any disordered use of things which would be in contempt of the Creator and would bring disastrous consequences for human beings and their environment.

I believe that God wills the interdependence of creatures. The spectacle of their countless diversities and inequalities tells us that no creature is self-sufficient. Creatures exist only in dependence on each other, to complete each other, in the service of each other.

I see the beauty of the universe. The order and harmony of the created world results from the diversity of beings and from the relationships which exist among them. Man discovers them progressively as the laws of nature. They call forth the admiration of scholars. The beauty of creation reflects the infinite beauty of the Creator and ought to inspire the respect and submission of man's intellect and will.

I believe the hierarchy of creatures is expressed by the order of the "six days", from the less perfect to the more perfect. God loves all his creatures and takes care of each one. Nevertheless, Jesus said: "You are of more value than many sparrows", or again: "Of how much more value is a man than a sheep!"

I believe that man is the summit of the Creator's work, as the inspired account expresses by clearly distinguishing the creation of man from that of the other creatures.

I believe there is a solidarity among all creatures arising from the fact that all have the same Creator and are all ordered to his glory.


Paraphrased and excerpted from the Catechism of the Catholic Church

"I believe that man is the summit of the Creator's work". Does that include Josef Mengele?
Sure and you too. ;)

What you intend for evil, God is using for good.
So god was using Mengele for good? :cuckoo:
If that's how you want to see it, but then of course you would have to see it that God is using you for good too.
So god wasn't using Mengele for good?
 
OP
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ding

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The following are my beliefs which in part come from my faith. I believe God created the material world and everything in it. Please feel free to discuss.

God himself created the visible world in all its richness, diversity and order. Scripture presents the work of the Creator symbolically as a succession of six days of divine "work", concluded by the "rest" of the seventh day. On the subject of creation, the sacred text teaches the truths revealed by God for our salvation, permitting us to recognize the inner nature, the value and the ordering of the whole of creation to the praise of God.

I believe that Nothing exists that does not owe its existence to God the Creator. The world began when God's word drew it out of nothingness; all existent beings, all of nature, and all human history are rooted in this primordial event, the very genesis by which the world was constituted and time begun.

I believe that each creature possesses its own particular goodness and perfection. For each one of the works of the "six days" it is said: "And God saw that it was good." By the very nature of creation, material being is endowed with its own stability, truth and excellence, its own order and laws. Each of the various creatures, willed in its own being, reflects in its own way a ray of God's infinite wisdom and goodness. Man must therefore respect the particular goodness of every creature, to avoid any disordered use of things which would be in contempt of the Creator and would bring disastrous consequences for human beings and their environment.

I believe that God wills the interdependence of creatures. The spectacle of their countless diversities and inequalities tells us that no creature is self-sufficient. Creatures exist only in dependence on each other, to complete each other, in the service of each other.

I see the beauty of the universe. The order and harmony of the created world results from the diversity of beings and from the relationships which exist among them. Man discovers them progressively as the laws of nature. They call forth the admiration of scholars. The beauty of creation reflects the infinite beauty of the Creator and ought to inspire the respect and submission of man's intellect and will.

I believe the hierarchy of creatures is expressed by the order of the "six days", from the less perfect to the more perfect. God loves all his creatures and takes care of each one. Nevertheless, Jesus said: "You are of more value than many sparrows", or again: "Of how much more value is a man than a sheep!"

I believe that man is the summit of the Creator's work, as the inspired account expresses by clearly distinguishing the creation of man from that of the other creatures.

I believe there is a solidarity among all creatures arising from the fact that all have the same Creator and are all ordered to his glory.


Paraphrased and excerpted from the Catechism of the Catholic Church

"I believe that Nothing exists that does not owe its existence to God the Creator." So parents of deformed and retarded babies now know what happened, it was god who made their baby like that.
If that's how you want to see it, sure, Taz. Of course I see it like with infinite power God could always create something better. But with infinite wisdom and goodness God freely willed to create a world "in a state of journeying" towards its ultimate perfection. In God's plan this process of becoming involves the appearance of certain beings and the disappearance of others, the existence of the more perfect alongside the less perfect, both constructive and destructive forces of nature. For almighty God. . ., because he is supremely good, would never allow anything bad to exist in his works if he were not so all-powerful and good as to cause good to emerge from it.
How do you know that it's "in a state of journeying" towards its ultimate perfection.
How can you not?
That's not proof, c'mon, give it a little effort.
How do you know it's not? Where's your proof?
 
OP
ding

ding

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The following are my beliefs which in part come from my faith. I believe God created the material world and everything in it. Please feel free to discuss.

God himself created the visible world in all its richness, diversity and order. Scripture presents the work of the Creator symbolically as a succession of six days of divine "work", concluded by the "rest" of the seventh day. On the subject of creation, the sacred text teaches the truths revealed by God for our salvation, permitting us to recognize the inner nature, the value and the ordering of the whole of creation to the praise of God.

I believe that Nothing exists that does not owe its existence to God the Creator. The world began when God's word drew it out of nothingness; all existent beings, all of nature, and all human history are rooted in this primordial event, the very genesis by which the world was constituted and time begun.

I believe that each creature possesses its own particular goodness and perfection. For each one of the works of the "six days" it is said: "And God saw that it was good." By the very nature of creation, material being is endowed with its own stability, truth and excellence, its own order and laws. Each of the various creatures, willed in its own being, reflects in its own way a ray of God's infinite wisdom and goodness. Man must therefore respect the particular goodness of every creature, to avoid any disordered use of things which would be in contempt of the Creator and would bring disastrous consequences for human beings and their environment.

I believe that God wills the interdependence of creatures. The spectacle of their countless diversities and inequalities tells us that no creature is self-sufficient. Creatures exist only in dependence on each other, to complete each other, in the service of each other.

I see the beauty of the universe. The order and harmony of the created world results from the diversity of beings and from the relationships which exist among them. Man discovers them progressively as the laws of nature. They call forth the admiration of scholars. The beauty of creation reflects the infinite beauty of the Creator and ought to inspire the respect and submission of man's intellect and will.

I believe the hierarchy of creatures is expressed by the order of the "six days", from the less perfect to the more perfect. God loves all his creatures and takes care of each one. Nevertheless, Jesus said: "You are of more value than many sparrows", or again: "Of how much more value is a man than a sheep!"

I believe that man is the summit of the Creator's work, as the inspired account expresses by clearly distinguishing the creation of man from that of the other creatures.

I believe there is a solidarity among all creatures arising from the fact that all have the same Creator and are all ordered to his glory.


Paraphrased and excerpted from the Catechism of the Catholic Church

"I believe that man is the summit of the Creator's work". Does that include Josef Mengele?
Sure and you too. ;)

What you intend for evil, God is using for good.
So god was using Mengele for good? :cuckoo:
If that's how you want to see it, but then of course you would have to see it that God is using you for good too.
So god wasn't using Mengele for good?
So God isn't using you for good?
 
OP
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ding

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Everything happens for a reason. :thup:
 
OP
ding

ding

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In time we can discover that God in his almighty providence can bring a good from the consequences of an evil, even a moral evil, caused by his creatures: "It was not you", said Joseph to his brothers, "who sent me here, but God. . . You meant evil against me; but God meant it for good, to bring it about that many people should be kept alive." From the greatest moral evil ever committed - the rejection and murder of God's only Son, caused by the sins of all men - God, by his grace that "abounded all the more", brought the greatest of goods: the glorification of Christ and our redemption. But for all that, evil never becomes a good.
 

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