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The Alt-Right is an Actual Movement, The Alt-Left is something disgruntled Alt-Righters Made Up

MarcATL

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The Alt-Right has been politically active in this country from as early as 2010, it's led by White Supremist David Spencer

From Wiki...

The alt-right, or alternative right, is a loosely defined group of people with far-right ideologies who reject mainstream conservatism in favor of white nationalism, principally in the United States, but also to a lesser degree in Canada and Europe.[1][2][3][4] Paul Gottfried is the first person to use the term "alternative right", when referring specifically to developments within American right-wing politics, in 2008.[5] The term has since gained wide currency with the rise of the so-called "alt-right". White supremacist[6] Richard Spencer coined the term in 2010 in reference to a movement centered on white nationalism, and has been accused by some media publications of doing so to excuse overt racism, white supremacism, and neo-Nazism.[1][7] The term drew considerable media attention and controversy during and after the 2016 US presidential election.[8]

Alt-right beliefs have been described as isolationist, protectionist, antisemitic, and white supremacist,[9][10][11] frequently overlapping with Neo-Nazism,[12][13][14] nativism and Islamophobia,[15][16][17][18][19] antifeminism and homophobia,[12][20][21][22] right-wing populism,[23][24] and the neoreactionary movement.[9][25] The concept has further been associated with multiple groups from American nationalists, neo-monarchists, men's rights advocates, and the 2016 presidential campaign of Donald Trump.[15][24][25][26][27]

The alt-right has its roots on Internet websites such as 4chan and 8chan, where anonymous members create and use Internet memes to express their ideologies.[9][14][28] It is difficult to tell how much of what people write in these venues is serious and how much is intended to provoke outrage.[23][29] Members of the alt-right use websites like Alternative Right, Twitter, Breitbart, and Reddit to convey their message.[30][31] Alt-right postings generally support Donald Trump[32][33][34][35] and oppose immigration, multiculturalism and political correctness.[13][20][36]

The alt-right has also had a significant influence on conservative thought in the United States, such as the Sailer Strategyfor winning political support, along with having close ties to the Trump Administration. It has been listed as a key reason for Trump's win in the 2016 election.[37][38] The Trump administration includes several figures who are associated with the alt-right, such as White House Chief Strategist Steve Bannon.[39] In 2016, Bannon described Breitbart as "the platform for the alt-right", with the goal of promoting the ideology.[40]
The alt-right, or alternative right, is a loosely defined group of people with far-right ideologies who reject mainstream conservatism in favor of white nationalism, principally in the United States, but also to a lesser degree in Canada and Europe.[1][2][3][4] Paul Gottfried is the first person to use the term "alternative right", when referring specifically to developments within American right-wing politics, in 2008.[5] The term has since gained wide currency with the rise of the so-called "alt-right". White supremacist[6] Richard Spencer coined the term in 2010 in reference to a movement centered on white nationalism, and has been accused by some media publications of doing so to excuse overt racism, white supremacism, and neo-Nazism.[1][7] The term drew considerable media attention and controversy during and after the 2016 US presidential election.[8]

Alt-right beliefs have been described as isolationist, protectionist, antisemitic, and white supremacist,[9][10][11] frequently overlapping with Neo-Nazism,[12][13][14] nativism and Islamophobia,[15][16][17][18][19] antifeminism and homophobia,[12][20][21][22] right-wing populism,[23][24] and the neoreactionary movement.[9][25] The concept has further been associated with multiple groups from American nationalists, neo-monarchists, men's rights advocates, and the 2016 presidential campaign of Donald Trump.[15][24][25][26][27]

The alt-right has its roots on Internet websites such as 4chan and 8chan, where anonymous members create and use Internet memes to express their ideologies.[9][14][28] It is difficult to tell how much of what people write in these venues is serious and how much is intended to provoke outrage.[23][29] Members of the alt-right use websites like Alternative Right, Twitter, Breitbart, and Reddit to convey their message.[30][31] Alt-right postings generally support Donald Trump[32][33][34][35] and oppose immigration, multiculturalism and political correctness.[13][20][36]

The alt-right has also had a significant influence on conservative thought in the United States, such as the Sailer Strategyfor winning political support, along with having close ties to the Trump Administration. It has been listed as a key reason for Trump's win in the 2016 election.[37][38] The Trump administration includes several figures who are associated with the alt-right, such as White House Chief Strategist Steve Bannon.[39] In 2016, Bannon described Breitbart as "the platform for the alt-right", with the goal of promoting the ideology.[40]

Source: Alt-right - Wikipedia

The Alt-Right is politically active even more today...
Psychologists surveyed hundreds of alt-right supporters. The results are unsettling.
'Alt-Right' Leaders Won't Condemn Ramming Suspect
Yikes: Alt-Right Demonstrations Are Scheduled for Nine Cities Next Weekend
Donald Trump retweeted an alt-right conspiracy theorist. Here's why. - CNNPolitics
Richard Spencer Was My High-School Classmate
InfoWars’ Big Alt-Right Breakup With Richard Spencer—and the KKK
Nazi salutes and white supremacism: Who is Richard Spencer, the 'racist academic' behind the 'Alt right' movement


I'd like you disgruntled Alt-Righties on USMB to produce evidence of the made up Alt-Left movement.

Go ahead...I'll wait.
 

deanrd

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My favorite part is when Trump said the Alt Right, the Neo-Nazi's and the White Nationalists have been treated unfairly by the press. Not an exact quote. But very close. They just played it on Chuck Todd 5 minutes ago. He repeated what Trump said.

It'll be out there. The GOP will cheer, everyone else, not so much.
 

flacaltenn

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The Alt-Right has been politically active in this country from as early as 2010, it's led by White Supremist David Spencer

From Wiki...

The alt-right, or alternative right, is a loosely defined group of people with far-right ideologies who reject mainstream conservatism in favor of white nationalism, principally in the United States, but also to a lesser degree in Canada and Europe.[1][2][3][4] Paul Gottfried is the first person to use the term "alternative right", when referring specifically to developments within American right-wing politics, in 2008.[5] The term has since gained wide currency with the rise of the so-called "alt-right". White supremacist[6] Richard Spencer coined the term in 2010 in reference to a movement centered on white nationalism, and has been accused by some media publications of doing so to excuse overt racism, white supremacism, and neo-Nazism.[1][7] The term drew considerable media attention and controversy during and after the 2016 US presidential election.[8]

Alt-right beliefs have been described as isolationist, protectionist, antisemitic, and white supremacist,[9][10][11] frequently overlapping with Neo-Nazism,[12][13][14] nativism and Islamophobia,[15][16][17][18][19] antifeminism and homophobia,[12][20][21][22] right-wing populism,[23][24] and the neoreactionary movement.[9][25] The concept has further been associated with multiple groups from American nationalists, neo-monarchists, men's rights advocates, and the 2016 presidential campaign of Donald Trump.[15][24][25][26][27]

The alt-right has its roots on Internet websites such as 4chan and 8chan, where anonymous members create and use Internet memes to express their ideologies.[9][14][28] It is difficult to tell how much of what people write in these venues is serious and how much is intended to provoke outrage.[23][29] Members of the alt-right use websites like Alternative Right, Twitter, Breitbart, and Reddit to convey their message.[30][31] Alt-right postings generally support Donald Trump[32][33][34][35] and oppose immigration, multiculturalism and political correctness.[13][20][36]

The alt-right has also had a significant influence on conservative thought in the United States, such as the Sailer Strategyfor winning political support, along with having close ties to the Trump Administration. It has been listed as a key reason for Trump's win in the 2016 election.[37][38] The Trump administration includes several figures who are associated with the alt-right, such as White House Chief Strategist Steve Bannon.[39] In 2016, Bannon described Breitbart as "the platform for the alt-right", with the goal of promoting the ideology.[40]
The alt-right, or alternative right, is a loosely defined group of people with far-right ideologies who reject mainstream conservatism in favor of white nationalism, principally in the United States, but also to a lesser degree in Canada and Europe.[1][2][3][4] Paul Gottfried is the first person to use the term "alternative right", when referring specifically to developments within American right-wing politics, in 2008.[5] The term has since gained wide currency with the rise of the so-called "alt-right". White supremacist[6] Richard Spencer coined the term in 2010 in reference to a movement centered on white nationalism, and has been accused by some media publications of doing so to excuse overt racism, white supremacism, and neo-Nazism.[1][7] The term drew considerable media attention and controversy during and after the 2016 US presidential election.[8]

Alt-right beliefs have been described as isolationist, protectionist, antisemitic, and white supremacist,[9][10][11] frequently overlapping with Neo-Nazism,[12][13][14] nativism and Islamophobia,[15][16][17][18][19] antifeminism and homophobia,[12][20][21][22] right-wing populism,[23][24] and the neoreactionary movement.[9][25] The concept has further been associated with multiple groups from American nationalists, neo-monarchists, men's rights advocates, and the 2016 presidential campaign of Donald Trump.[15][24][25][26][27]

The alt-right has its roots on Internet websites such as 4chan and 8chan, where anonymous members create and use Internet memes to express their ideologies.[9][14][28] It is difficult to tell how much of what people write in these venues is serious and how much is intended to provoke outrage.[23][29] Members of the alt-right use websites like Alternative Right, Twitter, Breitbart, and Reddit to convey their message.[30][31] Alt-right postings generally support Donald Trump[32][33][34][35] and oppose immigration, multiculturalism and political correctness.[13][20][36]

The alt-right has also had a significant influence on conservative thought in the United States, such as the Sailer Strategyfor winning political support, along with having close ties to the Trump Administration. It has been listed as a key reason for Trump's win in the 2016 election.[37][38] The Trump administration includes several figures who are associated with the alt-right, such as White House Chief Strategist Steve Bannon.[39] In 2016, Bannon described Breitbart as "the platform for the alt-right", with the goal of promoting the ideology.[40]

Source: Alt-right - Wikipedia

The Alt-Right is politically active even more today...
Psychologists surveyed hundreds of alt-right supporters. The results are unsettling.
'Alt-Right' Leaders Won't Condemn Ramming Suspect
Yikes: Alt-Right Demonstrations Are Scheduled for Nine Cities Next Weekend
Donald Trump retweeted an alt-right conspiracy theorist. Here's why. - CNNPolitics
Richard Spencer Was My High-School Classmate
InfoWars’ Big Alt-Right Breakup With Richard Spencer—and the KKK
Nazi salutes and white supremacism: Who is Richard Spencer, the 'racist academic' behind the 'Alt right' movement


I'd like you disgruntled Alt-Righties on USMB to produce evidence of the made up Alt-Left movement.

Go ahead...I'll wait.

Says right in your material. It's a movement to adopt the strategies of the leftist to PUNK and TRIGGER the opposition. To get folks to listen to non politically correct arguments.

The alt-right has its roots on Internet websites such as 4chan and 8chan, where anonymous members create and use Internet memes to express their ideologies.[9][14][28] It is difficult to tell how much of what people write in these venues is serious and how much is intended to provoke outrage.

As in the Milo Yianopolous, the Gay Jew with Black lovers who has been ASSAULTED as a leader of the alt-right. That's what you have as evidence.

Oh and Richard Spencer?? ENTIRE NET WORTH of the NatPolicyInst that is the "alt-right thinktank" was $4700 last time I checked the orgwatch sites. And they meet in Holiday Inn Expresses because Holiday Inn meeting rooms are TOO large and expensive.

BreitBart? Founded and owned by a JEW???

You've been punked. Silly Green Frog emblems and all....
 

Pumpkin Row

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If there is no AltLeft, then are you willing to call ANTIFA and its supporters just leftists?
 

C_Clayton_Jones

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The Alt-Right has been politically active in this country from as early as 2010, it's led by White Supremist David Spencer

From Wiki...

The alt-right, or alternative right, is a loosely defined group of people with far-right ideologies who reject mainstream conservatism in favor of white nationalism, principally in the United States, but also to a lesser degree in Canada and Europe.[1][2][3][4] Paul Gottfried is the first person to use the term "alternative right", when referring specifically to developments within American right-wing politics, in 2008.[5] The term has since gained wide currency with the rise of the so-called "alt-right". White supremacist[6] Richard Spencer coined the term in 2010 in reference to a movement centered on white nationalism, and has been accused by some media publications of doing so to excuse overt racism, white supremacism, and neo-Nazism.[1][7] The term drew considerable media attention and controversy during and after the 2016 US presidential election.[8]

Alt-right beliefs have been described as isolationist, protectionist, antisemitic, and white supremacist,[9][10][11] frequently overlapping with Neo-Nazism,[12][13][14] nativism and Islamophobia,[15][16][17][18][19] antifeminism and homophobia,[12][20][21][22] right-wing populism,[23][24] and the neoreactionary movement.[9][25] The concept has further been associated with multiple groups from American nationalists, neo-monarchists, men's rights advocates, and the 2016 presidential campaign of Donald Trump.[15][24][25][26][27]

The alt-right has its roots on Internet websites such as 4chan and 8chan, where anonymous members create and use Internet memes to express their ideologies.[9][14][28] It is difficult to tell how much of what people write in these venues is serious and how much is intended to provoke outrage.[23][29] Members of the alt-right use websites like Alternative Right, Twitter, Breitbart, and Reddit to convey their message.[30][31] Alt-right postings generally support Donald Trump[32][33][34][35] and oppose immigration, multiculturalism and political correctness.[13][20][36]

The alt-right has also had a significant influence on conservative thought in the United States, such as the Sailer Strategyfor winning political support, along with having close ties to the Trump Administration. It has been listed as a key reason for Trump's win in the 2016 election.[37][38] The Trump administration includes several figures who are associated with the alt-right, such as White House Chief Strategist Steve Bannon.[39] In 2016, Bannon described Breitbart as "the platform for the alt-right", with the goal of promoting the ideology.[40]
The alt-right, or alternative right, is a loosely defined group of people with far-right ideologies who reject mainstream conservatism in favor of white nationalism, principally in the United States, but also to a lesser degree in Canada and Europe.[1][2][3][4] Paul Gottfried is the first person to use the term "alternative right", when referring specifically to developments within American right-wing politics, in 2008.[5] The term has since gained wide currency with the rise of the so-called "alt-right". White supremacist[6] Richard Spencer coined the term in 2010 in reference to a movement centered on white nationalism, and has been accused by some media publications of doing so to excuse overt racism, white supremacism, and neo-Nazism.[1][7] The term drew considerable media attention and controversy during and after the 2016 US presidential election.[8]

Alt-right beliefs have been described as isolationist, protectionist, antisemitic, and white supremacist,[9][10][11] frequently overlapping with Neo-Nazism,[12][13][14] nativism and Islamophobia,[15][16][17][18][19] antifeminism and homophobia,[12][20][21][22] right-wing populism,[23][24] and the neoreactionary movement.[9][25] The concept has further been associated with multiple groups from American nationalists, neo-monarchists, men's rights advocates, and the 2016 presidential campaign of Donald Trump.[15][24][25][26][27]

The alt-right has its roots on Internet websites such as 4chan and 8chan, where anonymous members create and use Internet memes to express their ideologies.[9][14][28] It is difficult to tell how much of what people write in these venues is serious and how much is intended to provoke outrage.[23][29] Members of the alt-right use websites like Alternative Right, Twitter, Breitbart, and Reddit to convey their message.[30][31] Alt-right postings generally support Donald Trump[32][33][34][35] and oppose immigration, multiculturalism and political correctness.[13][20][36]

The alt-right has also had a significant influence on conservative thought in the United States, such as the Sailer Strategyfor winning political support, along with having close ties to the Trump Administration. It has been listed as a key reason for Trump's win in the 2016 election.[37][38] The Trump administration includes several figures who are associated with the alt-right, such as White House Chief Strategist Steve Bannon.[39] In 2016, Bannon described Breitbart as "the platform for the alt-right", with the goal of promoting the ideology.[40]

Source: Alt-right - Wikipedia

The Alt-Right is politically active even more today...
Psychologists surveyed hundreds of alt-right supporters. The results are unsettling.
'Alt-Right' Leaders Won't Condemn Ramming Suspect
Yikes: Alt-Right Demonstrations Are Scheduled for Nine Cities Next Weekend
Donald Trump retweeted an alt-right conspiracy theorist. Here's why. - CNNPolitics
Richard Spencer Was My High-School Classmate
InfoWars’ Big Alt-Right Breakup With Richard Spencer—and the KKK
Nazi salutes and white supremacism: Who is Richard Spencer, the 'racist academic' behind the 'Alt right' movement


I'd like you disgruntled Alt-Righties on USMB to produce evidence of the made up Alt-Left movement.

Go ahead...I'll wait.
Correct.

And much of what the Alt-Right advocates for is part of the Trump agenda of hate and bigotry, an agenda supported by most Republicans and conservatives:

Hateful anti-Hispanic, anti- Mexican rhetoric

The Muslim travel bans

Unwarranted threats made against mythical ‘sanctuary cities’

Plans to limit legal immigration

It’s part of the same hateful rightwing agenda predicated on fear of change, diversity, inclusion, and expressions of individual liberty.
 

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