Building a fence on the Mexican border , kills 2 birds with one stone

Lovebears65

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It helps with illegal immigration and also they have to hire people to build the fence.. Puts people to work and also helps with the illegal immigration with tons of people coming across the border in droves!
 

Lakhota

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I have never seen a fence that I couldn't get through, over or under.
 
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Lovebears65

Lovebears65

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I have never seen a fence that I couldn't get through, over or under.
If you put electric wire on the top of it , I doubt people will try to climb over and dont say its inhumane the stupid fucks should not be climbing it to begin with put up signs this will electrocute you if you touch wires.. Im sure they can figure a way to build it that they cant get under either.
 

jgarden

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The Great Wall of China certainly kept the Mongols out!
 
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Lakhota

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The rich puppet masters are more interested in making Mexico part of the U.S. than fencing it off.
 

WatertheTree

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I have never seen a fence that I couldn't get through, over or under.
Or around...it's just water.
Dont we already have a problem with the mexican drug cartels digging huge elaborate tunnels?

But alias that is the typical response from a conservative socailist. Lets spend tons of money on a project that really isnt needed and wont accomplish anything.

Why dont we just do like Ron Paul says and bring the troops home to secure the border?
 

JoeB131

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Penn and Teller did this one bit where they went to a Home Depot and hired 6 illegals to build a section of fence just like the one commonly proposed. It took them the whole of the day to build a section that was about 20 feet long.

They then instructed them to get past the fence they just built. Two went under, two went over, two went through. They were all through in less than two minutes. Penn joked, "Hey, you think they've done this before?"

There is a very simple way to put an end to the illegal problem.

First, make them ineligible for ANY government services except for emergency medical treatment.

Second, go after the people who hire them with a vengence. No excuses, no "his papers looked okay", none of the BS. You get caught with one in your place of business, you are going to pay a huge fine. You get caught more than once, things will be worse.
 

idb

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Dig a big moat, that would employ more people than building a fence...if you need more work, just go back and dig it a bit deeper the following week...
 

Ravi

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I have never seen a fence that I couldn't get through, over or under.
If you put electric wire on the top of it , I doubt people will try to climb over and dont say its inhumane the stupid fucks should not be climbing it to begin with put up signs this will electrocute you if you touch wires.. Im sure they can figure a way to build it that they cant get under either.
Awesome, kill people for trying to escape poverty.

What a pig you are.

The fence would only push people to come via boat to Florida or the east coast.

Not only are you a pig, you're an idiot.
 

waltky

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Gov't. waste leavin' our borders wide open...
:mad:
DHS Spent $9.8M to Store $44M of Steel It Bought But Did Not Use to Build Mexico Border Fence
December 19, 2011 - U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP), a division of the Department of Homeland Security, has spent about $9.8 million to store $44 million in steel that it bought but did not use to build fence along the U.S,-Mexico border, according to a report from the DHS Inspector General.
CPB has in storage about 27,000 tons of “extra steel” that could be used to extend the estimated 650 miles of fencing mandated by Congress along the approximately 2,000-mile long southwest border, according to the IG. An IG report released in November notes that in January 2008, the CBP -- a DHS component -- awarded an unnamed “prime contractor” a “Supply and Supply Chain Management (SSCM) task order” for storing and purchasing steel to support the construction of fence along hundreds of miles of the U.S.-Mexico border by Dec. 31, 2008 as part of the Secure Border Initiative (SBI) that was mandated by Congress.

Although the report does not name the prime contractor who was awarded the SSCM task order, the CBP reported that it “teamed up with The Boeing Company” of Chicago, Ill. to “support and facilitate the successful execution” of all fence building operations under the SSCM project mentioned in the IG report. The steel purchased under the task order was used to build about 299 miles of the estimated 651 miles of fence that have been erected so far along the U.S.-Mexico border as requested by Congress. Most of the fence is single-layered, including 352 miles of fence aimed at preventing people from crossing the border illegally, known as a primary pedestrian fence, and 299 miles of fence aimed at preventing vehicle crossings known as a vehicle fence.

After using about 117,000 tons of steel to build the 299 miles of fence from a total of 145,000 tons purchased under the task order, “27,557 tons of extra steel, with a value of about $44 million, remained in storage,” said the DHS IG report. “CBP did not efficiently plan the purchase and storage of steel for the SSCM task order,” reported the DHS IG, later adding, “as a result, 27,557 tons of extra steel, with a value of about $44 million, remained in storage at the end of the task order. Further, CBP incurred $9.8 million in additional storage costs because it did not move the remaining steel to a government facility for more than 2 years after the original storage contract expired.”

According to the IG, “the original storage contract for the SSCM task order covered the period from April to December 2008” and “instead of moving the extra steel to a cost-efficient location, CBP extended the original contract and awarded a supplemental storage contract.” CBP ended up spending $9,753,010 in storage fees between January 2009 and March 2011 after making revisions to the original contract. The agency admitted to the DHS IG that the “extra steel” can be used to extend the fence along the southwest border. “CBP also indicated that if required to build additional fence, it would use the extra steel for future construction projects,” stated the IG. While the steel to build more border fence is being stored, Congress has only required CBP to fence about 650 miles of the approximately 2,000-mile long U.S.-Mexico border “where fencing would be most practical and effective,” noted the IG.

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States make daily life harder for illegal immigrants
20 Dec.`11 - State legislators looking to crack down on illegal immigration in 2012 are turning away from the law enforcement laws that dominated state houses this year, and instead are pushing other measures that can make life just as difficult for illegal immigrants.
Much of the international furor over state immigration laws in states such as Arizona and Alabama focused on the portions that granted local police the ability to conduct roadside immigration checks of people stopped for other crimes. Alabama leaders are now considering revisions after foreign workers at Mercedes-Benz and Honda carmaking plants in the state were detained under the new law. The U.S. Department of Justice has sued to block four state enforcement laws — Alabama, Arizona, South Carolina and Utah — and Arizona's law will be in limbo until at least next summer when the U.S. Supreme Court is expected to rule on its constitutionality. "(Immigration enforcement) bills in other states that were advancing, you may see them stall until we can get clarification from the Supreme Court," said South Carolina state Sen. Larry Grooms, a Republican whose enforcement bill passed this year. That political and legal turmoil has left few legislators in other states pushing new law enforcement laws.

Mississippi state Sen. Joey Fillingane, a Republican whose enforcement bill passed the state Senate and could pass the House with a new Republican majority there this year, said he won't let potentially-lengthy reviews of Arizona's enforcement law stop him from pushing a similar measure. "We understand from being attorneys and dealing with appeals that rulings can take a long, long time," Fillingane said. "I don't think that's any reason … to stop everything in its tracks." But Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach, who has helped Arizona and other state legislators craft laws cracking down on illegal immigrants, sees that as the exception. He said legislators will continue expanding the use of E-Verify, which businesses can use to check the immigration status of job applicants, Secure Communities, which allows police to check the immigration status of people booked into local jails, and laws that restrict illegal immigrants from accessing public benefits.

Yet it's a new provision in Alabama's law that has caught the eye of many state legislators. Kobach said Alabama was the first state to invalidate all contracts entered into with illegal immigrants. A strict reading of the law could mean that any contract, including mortgages, apartment leases and basic work agreements, can be ruled null and void. "That is one that has a much greater effect than some people might expect at first glance," Kobach said. "Suppose an illegal alien is doing some roofing business and wants to rent some equipment. Some short-term or long-term rental suddenly becomes more difficult to do." Another aspect of Alabama's law forbids illegal immigrants from conducting any "business transaction" with a government agency. An Alabama federal judge ruled that the state must stop using that provision to prohibit illegal immigrants from renewing permits for their mobile homes, but it's being applied elsewhere. The combination of those provisions "has led to nothing short of chaos in the state," said Karen Tumlin, managing attorney for the National Immigration Law Center, which was part of a lawsuit against Alabama's law. "They've been applied to a striking range of activities, from getting tags on your cars to getting public utilities to changing title on your cars."

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waltky

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Gonna stop dem drug-runnin' submarines too...
:cool:
US ocean fence aims to curb smuggling
Thu, Feb 09, 2012 - US authorities are building a steel and concrete barrier 90m out into the Pacific Ocean south of San Diego to curb dangerous attempts by illegal immigrants and smugglers to slip through the breakers to California.
The new maritime fence is being built at a cost of US$4.3 million at the point where the US-Mexico border plunges into the ocean between San Diego and the industrial powerhouse of Tijuana in northwest Mexico. The new “surf fence” is a steel-and-concrete barrier up to 5.5m tall that replaces a rusted and uneven line of posts. “It was falling apart, it was out of alignment, it looked like a bad set of teeth,” US Customs and Border Protection spokesman Ralph DeSio said. “This is going to be much more aesthetically appealing to that area, but it also strengthens our abilities to prevent those dangerous smuggling attempts along that shoreline,” he said.

Federal authorities have in recent years added fencing and Border Patrol agents along the southwest US border with Mexico in a bid to stop illegal immigrant crossings and drug smuggling. The US Congress also mandated building a further 1,040km of fencing along the 3,200km border. Recent attempts to slip north through the surf and inshore waters to Imperial Beach, south of San Diego, have included two smugglers nabbed with marijuana piled onto a surfboard in 2009, and a pair of wetsuit-clad illegal immigrants arrested in February last year with self-propelled underwater dive scooters.

The upgrade comes at a time when smugglers are increasingly pushing further out to sea in open-topped panga fishing boats to run illegal immigrants and tonnes of marijuana up the coast as far as Los Angeles and Santa Barbara. There have been 14 incidents there since October last year. In a bid to make it more resilient to the pounding Pacific waves, the new barrier, due for completion next month, is coated with protectants inside and out and filled with concrete.

The effort under way to ratchet up security at the beach, which includes a stretch of fencing that runs more than 270m inland, is raising some eyebrows in Tijuana. Policeman Cesar Ochoa is struck by the transformation to Parque Amistad, or Friendship Park, just back from the beach, where families separated by the border would chat informally through the bars of the fence beside a historic monument.

A double fence now walls off the area and prevents visitors from getting within a few meters of each other. “The only thing that remains from that time are the cement tables where people used to meet. There were Border Patrol agents watching over them ... but they let people interact,” Ochoa said. Local government employee Adriana Medina, 33, remembers families picnicking and playing ball and even partying in the park when she was growing up and is surprised by the upgrade that pushed “steel posts right into the sea.” “It looks like a jail,” she said. “I think it’s an overreaction.”

US ocean fence aims to curb smuggling - Taipei Times
 

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