Is The Cost of College Worth Debt?

Discussion in 'Education' started by Annie, Aug 8, 2010.

  1. Annie
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    Annie Diamond Member

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    Perhaps the better questions are: How much debt is it worth? Is or should college the right goal for all?

    Glenn Harlan Reynolds: Further thoughts on the higher education bubble | Washington Examiner

     
  2. Liberty
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    Liberty Silver Member

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    Good read. I am happy I pay cash for my tuition. (Yes, I earned it myself.)
     
  3. syrenn
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    syrenn BANNED

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    If you want something...PAY for it.
     
  4. Annie
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    Annie Diamond Member

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    I'm very much pro-university studies, I've spent more time in advanced studies than required schooling. ;) However, it's become the norm for nearly everyone to pick up after high school and that just doesn't seem to be working out for those coming out.

    We bemoan the lack of classes for the gifted and academically challenged, yet on some level seem to have bought into the idea that all are academically qualified to go to university. Is it any surprise that university education has been dummied down?

    On the other hand, how many kids that were naturally talented in trade type skills, were made to feel wrong if they weren't so keen on going to college? How well were they going to do in those required courses of British Lit? Probably as well as the average liberal arts student was in the required Trig courses, but that was one or two course out of two years required.

    Actually today's economy is for the first time in my lifetime that parents are listening to kids who say they want to try something else, before going onto college. Nearly everyone knows of someone under 25 who has a university degree but can't find an entry level job with benefits, at least one they consider entry level. Young people are trying to gain skills in what are traditionally the 'trades', though the unions aren't really hiring apprentices. The kids are picking them up off the union track. Electrical, plumbing, roofing, brick laying, all are skills and services needed. Car repairs is another. These are not jobs that China or India can be outsourced to.

    I'm guessing in a few years there will be major uproars in a state like IL, that requires union workers and wages for all work. Lots of things are changing, it will be interesting indeed to see where it all goes.
     
  5. Toro
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    This is an interesting topic.

    The price of higher education has skyrocketed over the past 20 years, and it is now a legitimate question for many people whether or not it is worth it, especially for those getting a degree outside of the professions.

    But even within the professions, it may not pay. One paper recently concluded that it no longer made financial sense to get a degree in law unless you get a job with a top decile firm.



    SSRN-Mamas Don't Let Your Babies Grow Up To Be...Lawyers by Herwig Schlunk

     
  6. Liberty
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    Liberty Silver Member

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    My experience at university of colorado (Ill be a senior in the fall) has overall been the same as high school to be honest. Professors are lazy, especially tenured ones, and they hand out A's fairly easily in my experience, at least in the arts and science department. I went to community college my first year of college and it was more challenging than state university. go figure.

    Not to mention the simple fact that 90% of my professors hate me because i dont subscribe to their liberal indoctrination haha. my papers on political subjects such as sustainability however get graded fairly which i am happy about. My final paper of rhetoric and writing advanced was about how cap and trade is a government power play. the professor commented "I disagree with you 100% but you have a good argument" and then there was a fat A on it. :p
     
    Last edited: Aug 8, 2010
  7. uscitizen
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    uscitizen Senior Member

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    College is not for all.
    Technical educations are all many desire or can handle. And we need those people keeping things running for those with college degrees.

    Everyone who works makes a contribution to our society and country and should not be belittled.
     
  8. Greenbeard
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    Greenbeard Gold Member

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    In part the answer to the question in the OP depends, of course, on what it is you want to do, in which case it may not be a simple dollars and cents analysis. I agree that not everyone may be cut out for university-level study and certainly not everyone requires a liberal arts education. But I wouldn't take that to suggest that someone should become a plumber simply to avoid taking out a student loan, even if the job in the field they want to enter ends up paying a salary comparable to what a plumber would make.

    Having a degree doesn't guarantee you an entry level job when you graduate but there's no denying that a great many entry-level jobs use credentials as a sorting mechanism by requiring that applicants have a BA. So is it worth taking on debt to get a degree? Depends on what you want to do, what's important to you (just money?), and if you're looking for an intellectual experience like that. There's no reason to push everyone into university-level studies but I'm also not comfortable with pushing otherwise qualified and enthusiastic candidates away from that simply for financial reasons.
     
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  9. KissMy
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    KissMy Free Breast Exam

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    I have 3 Family members that have graduated over the past 2 years with nearly $100K student loan debt each. Not one of them has a full time job paying $9 per hour or more.
     
  10. Annie
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    Annie Diamond Member

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    I agree that a liberal arts background is useful in many endeavors, yet most universities have dumb down those courses so badly, that AP equivalents for the 100 level exceeds what the universities are offering. Grade inflation in most schools is also worse than in secondary schools, which is no consolation to the high school education. Truth is, AP courses are what regular courses were 50 years ago.

    If a student wants engineering, medicine, law, sciences, there's no alternative to universities. The proliferation of BA's though, have led to it being a requirement to many entry level positions, with no discernible reason other than an assumption of finishing what you start. However, many employers have found that that's not true, in many cases it's just proof of loans or parents paying.
     

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