Dog Nippin Problem

Discussion in 'Pets' started by CZKG_Crockett, Jul 29, 2012.

  1. CZKG_Crockett
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    CZKG_Crockett Rookie

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    I have a 17 month old male Feist with a nippin and jumpin issue. He like to nip at ur hands and feet and ears and pretty much anythin he can get his mouth around. I was wonderin if anyone knew of a way to stop the habbit. I hate hittin him but sometimes he bites really hard and I just can't stop myself, plus he doesn't seem to learn because after I smack his snout, he goes right back to tryin to bite so I know that won't work.

    We got him from a rescue, so we didn't have him as a puppy. There are a few things I want to teach him, but I need to stop this bitin. I have a 4 yr old son and a 7 month old daughter that I don't want to see hurt because he thinks they are tryin to play with him.
     
  2. Vel
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    Vel Gold Member

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    You'll find that if you go ahead and start working on a regular, ie.. sit..stay heel..obedience program that the problem will be easier to resolve. If you have a good program in your area, sign up for a group class. If you don't have a class to attend, get a good training collar and a good training book. I would recommend a crate so that the dog has a safe place to call his own and you have a place that you can safely leave him when you can't supervise or when you need a time out. Once you've been able to teach him a few basic manners, you can distract him away from the bad behavior by giving him a command that he understands and can succeed at. For example, if he's jumping at you, redirect his behavior by telling him to sit. When he sits, praise him and offer a toy or chew. Teaching him to play frisbee or fetch is also a great plan. He's an energetic breed and if you'll throw a ball or a frisbee a few times to get a bit of energy off of him, he'll be easier to deal with.
    I know that it can be frustrating, but try to remember that his poor behavior is not his fault. He would do his best to please you if he only knew what it is that you want.
     
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  3. strollingbones
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    strollingbones Diamond Member

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    no hitting......vel is right...exercise and attention...it just takes time...
     
  4. Noomi
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    Noomi Ninja Kicker Supporting Member

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    He is biting because you are hitting him, you moron. Don't EVER hit a dog - they will try and defend themselves and that is why people get bitten.

    And for christ sake, learn proper grammar.
     
  5. koshergrl
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    koshergrl Diamond Member

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    Hitting won't help.

    When he jumps on you, turn your back, and just keep turning from him until he stops and sits, then praise him. Do it every time, he'll stop.

    When he bites, same thing, turn away, hold your hands folded at chest level, look away (up at the ceiling) until he stops.

    You're at the point in his training where it's do or die. Adolescent dogs have to be trained in some manner; you can't just ignore naughty behavior and fail to address it or they're ruined. I recently went through this with my saint. We managed to get the jumping/nipping taken care of when he was very young, we had to...but when he was the age of your pup it was all about hitting the end of his leash, dragging me when we were walking, jumping and getting excited over new people/dogs he saw etc. So we had to deal.

    Walking will help almost any behavior. You're forced to interact with them and they have an outlet and distraction.

    I started taking my boy to the beach (I'm lucky I live on the coast). The access to the beach is a huge dune, so I would make him walk behind me as we climbed the dune (this is where he traditionally liked to surge ahead) and I climb slowly...then also down on the other side, and only when we'd made the climb up and down, and he was sitting calmly would I release him to run.

    Then he gets to run for a while, then back on the leash for the dune climb back to the car.

    The thing is...this short exercise fixed all sorts of other issues. Nervous barking and racing around at home, for example. He'd gotten into a habit of spending an hour or so every night racing through the house, barking and playing with m other dog. Extremely disruptive, messy, loud, and dangerous because he runs into things and jumps up on the bed and stuff.

    So start walking him, and when he jumps on or nips you, raise your hands to your chest and fold them (don't flap them around over his head), look at the ceiling and turn away from him.
     
  6. koshergrl
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    koshergrl Diamond Member

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    Another issue we've had to address is running out the front door, and charging visitors to my house. I've just had to take it in hand. You can't ignore it, you can't pretend it isn't happening, and you can't just yell.

    I have to take my time when the doorbell rings. The door doesn't get opened until he's sitting some 10 feet back from the door or so, and the other dog as well. When they're focused on me, and back from the door, then the door gets opened. I don't hang onto them and open the door, it's just chaos. So they have to sit or lay down, then the door gets opened.

    They still bark like crazy and race around when anybody goes to the door, but they're learning that when I go to the door, they go to their spots and wait.
     
  7. CMike
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    CMike Zionist, proud to be

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    NEVER HIT YOUR DOG!!!

    Puppy's like to mouth. It's how they learn. They also are teething.

    I suggest get some chew toys. Maybe a kong.

    Also if he nips you can pinch his lip a little .

    As far as jumping try putting your knee out when he jumps. Then it won't be as much fun.
     
  8. CZKG_Crockett
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    CZKG_Crockett Rookie

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    Wow when I said hit, I meant a nudge on the snout, not a full blown smack. Who pissed in your Cheerios, Noomi?

    Thanks for the help, koshergrl. He is great for me on the leash so that's not an issue. I take him for walks before work and when I get home and again before bed. He does have the crazy run around the house at night but it's not very often.

    He does get a little crazy when someone comes into the house, but when I call for him he runs right over to me and sits at my feet or on my lap. Same thing when we are outside and someone walks past while he's sittin next to me on the leash. He'll whimper a little and the works, but for the most part, he stays with me.

    He doesn't bite because I'm hittin him. I don't sit there and wind up and hit him as hard as I can. I give him a smack on the snout. He's not bittin me because he's defendin himself, Noobi. He's tryin to play and nibble and act like a typical puppy. Society would be much better off without ignorance like yourself in the world.
     
  9. koshergrl
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    koshergrl Diamond Member

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    Just turn your back on him pointedly, and don't look at him..and put your hands up. He'll stop.

    If he's doing it when you're in bed or chair, make him get down, or get up and walk away from him.
     
  10. Wolfsister77
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    Wolfsister77 Knowledge Is Power Supporting Member

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    I agree with a few comments in here. Jumping up is best handled with turning your back and ignoring the behavior until it stops. This will have to be done repeatedly. I also agree that a good obedience class is a great idea and giving the dog plenty of exercise and a way to burn off energy. Another good thing is to give the dog something acceptable to chew on and then redirect the dog to that. Unfortunately, even smacking on the snout teaches a dog to nip at your hand. Best thing to do is stand up, turn your back, and keep your hands out of the way and ignore the bad behavior. Spend plenty of time rewarding good behavior. Repetition is the key and your dog will learn. Good luck!!
     

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