What do you all think of hydrogen fuel cells to power trucks and cars?

zaangalewa

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The hydrogen fuel cell vehicle, another compressed gas vehicle, is here now, and can be produced in models larger across the board with more driving range than the EV which is nice. Aren't you tired of those mini and full-sized mini SUVs all over the place?

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2020 Jaguar EV


Comparable BMW hydrogen fuel cell vehicle

The only drawback I see is the higher cost for the HFC vehicle and higher cost for the hydrogen fuel at $5.30/gal at today's prices. Yet, companies such as FedEx and UPS are starting to use HFC vehicles. I've driven CNG vehicles and they were great for limited travel in terms of cost compared to the price of regular gas.
The price will sink the more companies produce hydrogen. 1 kg hydrogen is normally enough energy for100 kilometers for a little car.

I don't know what you calculate, because a value for a volume makes not a big sense in context hydrogen. But in case the volume is an equivalent for the mass of water then 1 gallon is a volume of about 3.8 Liter what would be an equilvalent in water for a mass of 3.8 kg. So this would be enough energy for about 380 km and 380 km / 1.6 = about 240 miles. The car on the picture is not little and the developement is in the beginning so it are perhaps "only" 200 miles per "gallon" or 1/2 "gallon" per 100 miles. And the "exhaust gas" is simple water in this case.
 
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zaangalewa

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Burning fossil fuels to make electricity is inefficient ... we lose power in the process ...

With that in mind ... we add yet another layer of inefficiencies using our fossil fuel fired electricity to make hydrogen ... even more loss of power ...

What's the point? ... we'll run out of hydrogen just like we'll run out of fossil fuels ... there's a finite amount of the stuff ya know ...
No. With solar energy for example you are able to split water in hydrogen and oxygen. And a car wins speed by burning hydrogen and oxygen down to water. So if we will have superflous solar energy - specially in summer we have a lot of superflous solar energy on normal roofs - we can produce hydrogen with this energy.

Hydrogen is the bridge technology between alternative energies and conventional energy. I theory you could for example use hydrogen also for the production of other forms of fuels - but the efficiency sinks in this case. On the other side exists often in summer much to much alternative energy, which no one is using (if for example an energy system is optimized for winter).
 
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Toddsterpatriot

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Doesn't save money, doesn't reduce pollution, doesn't save energy and isn't safer.

Seems like the perfect liberal "solution".
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Get outta the way in your tiny EV, Toddsterpatriot, you wanker.

It does reduce pollution as been stated and saves energy. It's larger size makes it safer than the smaller EVs. The higher cost for the vehicle and fuel are the main drawbacks.
It does reduce pollution as been stated and saves energy.

It does neither.
Generating H2 is an energy loser. Unless you're getting it from nuclear, it adds pollution.
 

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