The USA's Great Proud Just History.

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elektra

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Most people know nothing of the Rape of Nanjing, and it is the same for many of the details one needs to know to understand how and why we came to use two atomic bombs on the Japanese. The Japanese were every bit as brutal and barbaric as the Germans. The deadly part is they did it as a happy society. They thought nothing of what they did, it was simply normal for the Japanese. From the gang rape of 10 year old virgin girls to the bayoneting of babies still in the womb of their mothers. The Japanese committed atrocities and happily went on to commit more. 27 Nanking Massacre Photos That Reveal One Of History's Very Worst Atrocities
japanese-soldier-holding-head.jpg
 
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Japanese's killings were so cruel, savage, their ways of killing are beyond human imagination. They took killing people as a game. For instance, once, Japanese invaders tied up more than one thousand refugees from several places in a square, and made them stand in rows. Some of them wore long robes, some wore suits, some were women, some were children, all bare-feeted. Japanese first sprayed gasoline on their body, and then shot them with machine guns, a big fire set off whenever a person was shot. Dying refugees being shot and burnt, their body shivered in pain, it was a field of flickering flames. Japanese invaders laughed wildly, took great pleasure in it.
(see: NanJing historical documents archive, Interview with Liu RouYuan who escaped to HuNan from NanJing, "Massacres in the Occupied areas", Vol. 5 )
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there4eyeM

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The sins of others never justify sin.
We cannot fathom the argument that because X committed an antrocity it is ok for Y.
"Context"? The war in the Pacific is the context. In that context, certain sites were bypassed because invasion was unnecessary. Certain islands were isolated, cut off, unable to resupply. At the end, this principle applied to Japan itself. There was no necessity of invasion, thus no necessity to save "a million G.I.s", as their lives would not be in danger. And this is so deafeningly clear that all argument to the contrary devolves to mere racist vengeance.
Who and what was the real threat to the U.S. in August of 1945?
 

fncceo

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We fought to destroy an enemy who started the war, we fought to bring our men home once the war began. Wives with children, happy for the safe return of their men. Many were not so lucky. Thousands of American children lost their fathers.
View attachment 373032
Based on the clothing, that pic appears to be from World War I. Women's clothing was significantly different in the 1940s.
 

gipper

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There are stories of Japanese children, sent into the mountains to escape the destruction of the cities.


Five short years. Yet in that time, much has changed. I began digging deeper into that war, visiting Hiroshima twice and gathering stories from those who were there.

Mushroom clouds of smoke can be seen filling the sky in two black and white images.

This week marks 75 years since the world's first two nuclear bombs were detonated over the Japanese cities of Hiroshima and Nagasaki.(Wikipedia)
On one trip, I met a woman who was born in the same year as my dad, Kazuko san. She was spritely and healthy at 84 years old and had travelled two hours by train to meet me.

She, too, spent a few years in the mountains. She never wanted to forget and she was passionate about educating the next generations about evacuated children.

When I returned the following year to film a documentary, hoping to meet her again and get her story on camera, she was dead.

She had moved house, then gotten a mild cold, and that was it. The chance to look into the eyes of someone who had seen it, lived it, gone.
Mass murdering innocent civilians is nothing to be proud of.
 
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elektra

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Based on the clothing, that pic appears to be from World War I. Women's clothing was significantly different in the 1940s.
You could be right. I was looking at that train car as well. I wonder if they were not more brushed aluminum. And maybe the military uniforms are closer to World War 1 as well.

I am no expert, I was a bit in a hurry on this thread. I spent a lot of time on it and thought it would convey more of the feeling to see soldiers returning to their families.

Good catch, thanks. I would change it if the time had not expired for edits.
 

Toddsterpatriot

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Based on the clothing, that pic appears to be from World War I. Women's clothing was significantly different in the 1940s.
You could be right. I was looking at that train car as well. I wonder if they were not more brushed aluminum. And maybe the military uniforms are closer to World War 1 as well.

I am no expert, I was a bit in a hurry on this thread. I spent a lot of time on it and thought it would convey more of the feeling to see soldiers returning to their families.

Good catch, thanks. I would change it if the time had not expired for edits.
1597015581120.png


 
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elektra

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The sins of others never justify sin.
We cannot fathom the argument that because X committed an antrocity it is ok for Y.
"Context"? The war in the Pacific is the context. In that context, certain sites were bypassed because invasion was unnecessary. Certain islands were isolated, cut off, unable to resupply. At the end, this principle applied to Japan itself. There was no necessity of invasion, thus no necessity to save "a million G.I.s", as their lives would not be in danger. And this is so deafeningly clear that all argument to the contrary devolves to mere racist vengeance.
Who and what was the real threat to the U.S. in August of 1945?
It is a good point and I am sure with your education you can see it no other way. Your post tells me you were educated to see everything as racist. Thousands upon thousands of GI's married Japanese women after the defeat of Japan, so certainly you can not be speaking of GI's? And if GI's were not racist based on the fact of who they married, then how can the men who are leaders be the only racists?

"In that context"
The context in which we must defeat Japan, that is the question. Japan had it's armies all across Asia. In China, Burma, Vietnam, Laos, Cambodia, as well as many islands. You are suggesting that we simply allow the country who attacked us to keep all their war gains. Keep their huge Army, what was left of the Navy which was how many submarines. You simply suggest we walk away? Because you believe it is racist?

And what about the Americans who were prisoners of Japan, they are to be tortured and murdered, starved to death, because you believe it is racist to end the war?

In that context, you are cruel person. In the context of the Armies of Japan occupying a half dozen countries, dictating, torturing, murdering the inhabitants, your argument is absurd. That is simply racist.
 
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elektra

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Based on the clothing, that pic appears to be from World War I. Women's clothing was significantly different in the 1940s.
You could be right. I was looking at that train car as well. I wonder if they were not more brushed aluminum. And maybe the military uniforms are closer to World War 1 as well.

I am no expert, I was a bit in a hurry on this thread. I spent a lot of time on it and thought it would convey more of the feeling to see soldiers returning to their families.

Good catch, thanks. I would change it if the time had not expired for edits.
View attachment 373156

How is it, so hard to get what one wants when doing a simple google search.
 
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elektra

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Mass murdering innocent civilians is nothing to be proud of.
I am more than proud of the bombing of Nagasaki and Hiroshima.

Nothing you have ever posted is something to proud of. Sadly, the face of war is the face of death. That is a fact and there is no way to sugar coat it. Japan certainly knew that war is death, for the practiced thee most brutal form of warfare known to man. The mass murdering of innocent babies with the points of their bayonets while still in the womb of their mother.

Yes, the whole country of Japan went to war, teenagers and children working in the factories. Mothers working in the factories that were the war machine. All being programmed to defend their country to the death.

Yes we killed them, and we killed a whole lot of them with two bombs. We ended the war and put an end to the destruction that Japanese nation had perpetrated on the world. In the last century, the 20th century, war was brutal. We were forced not to fight simply a man, a soldier, an army, but an entire nation. And that nation was more than man, it was woman and children. I know that as well as anyone.

I am proud we ended the war with the Atomic bombs, there was no other way to end the war on August 9th of 1945. Prolonging the war further, was a brutal death sentence for many american POW's and the entire nation of Japan. Two cities sacrificed for the greater good of a greater number of people. But most importantly, to save our POW's and our soldiers. No country deserves to be a country that does not look out for their own people first.
 
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elektra

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The US committed sin when it fought Japan in World War II?
Interesting opinion.
Then the original sin was building an army and navy. The original sin was fighting back. You are stating that we should of died, be killed, and it was a sin to prevent that.
 
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vet.gif

It is actually hard to find photos of WW II vets returning home, hugging their children. This one is from 1943 and won a Pulitzer prize.
 

fncceo

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Japan of World War 2 was among the most fanatical enemies the US has ever faced. Not because of their race, but because of combination of political and cultural factors that led not only the Japanese military, but the Japanese populace to adopt a fanatical belief in their eventual victory.

Between 1944 and 1945, Japan launched nearly 3,000 suicide kamikaze suicide attacks on Allied Forces. Additionally, individual Japanese soldiers and civilians in conquered territories launched suicidal attacks on Allied Forces in the hundreds.

Japanese civilians, men, women, even school children drilled with bamboo spears to resist an Allied invasion of the Home Islands.

DBGm-KvW0AE96Qe.jpg


A land invasion of the Japanese Home Islands would have led to a horrific loss of human life, mostly Japanese Human Life.

In preparation for a land invasion, the Allies would have had to increase their carpet bombings of Japanese Cities, an action that took significantly more lives than the Atomic Bombings.

The application of two, rather small, nuclear devices changed this fanatical enemy into an entire country of peace-loving, liberal, capitalist pacifists.

I don't think any other technology invented for war has had such a similar effect to induce positive change.
 

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View attachment 373159
It is actually hard to find photos of WW II vets returning home, hugging their children. This one is from 1943 and won a Pulitzer prize.
Everyone's favorite. Sums it all up.

Legendary_kiss_V–J_day_in_Times_Square_Alfred_Eisenstaedt.jpg


That kiss would never have happened if not for the expedient end of the Pacific War.
 

there4eyeM

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When people are so full of themselves and their received dogma, there is little anyone can do to communicate with them. In fact, any such contact is intentionally misinterpreted and distorted, as can be seen so clearly once more in this thread.
The Japanese were extremely racist, even more virulently than the Nazis. That was simply one of their great errors. It led them to suicidal attempts to inflict their empire on the world.
That excuses no one else from committing gross human errors (or "sins", as a metaphor). It does not justify the racism expressed against the Japanese.
The IJA in the field was exposed and vulnerable to all kinds of attack. Invading the home islands had nothing to do with that and was neither tactically nor strategically required. Incinerating women and children in Hiroshima did nothing to diminish troops elsewhere.
The absolutely crowning bit of delusional verbiage is expressing pride in the atrocities of war.
Now, pick this post apart, tear it into fragments and attack it in bits.
Adieu.
 
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elektra

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When people are so full of themselves and their received dogma, there is little anyone can do to communicate with them. In fact, any such contact is intentionally misinterpreted and distorted, as can be seen so clearly once more in this thread.
The Japanese were extremely racist, even more virulently than the Nazis. That was simply one of their great errors. It led them to suicidal attempts to inflict their empire on the world.
That excuses no one else from committing gross human errors (or "sins", as a metaphor). It does not justify the racism expressed against the Japanese.
The IJA in the field was exposed and vulnerable to all kinds of attack. Invading the home islands had nothing to do with that and was neither tactically nor strategically required. Incinerating women and children in Hiroshima did nothing to diminish troops elsewhere.
The absolutely crowning bit of delusional verbiage is expressing pride in the atrocities of war.
Now, pick this post apart, tear it into fragments and attack it in bits.
Adieu.
And what of your dogma? A tenet put forward as authoritative without adequate grounds.

Racism expressed against the Japanese? You have dictated such, authoritatively without stating or showing that such racism existed.

Racism against Asian people? Yet, we fought for the Chinese. Nothing more to say, your idea just had a nail ran through it's heart. Nothing else you say is valid once your premise is destroyed.

Racism, I get it. It is the new attack against our Great Proud Country. Everything and anything we have done is all racist according to the Democrats who for some reason always acquired power by fomenting hate. Your comment falls apart so easily because it is false.
 

Unkotare

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Much is said that portrays a false, negative, picture of our great history. In time I will present some facts, some history that we are proud of.

75th Anniversary of the End of World War II
August 9th, 1945
The second Atomic bomb is dropped on Japan....
Of all the great and admirable events in US history that have shaped the world we live in, you are incapable of finding something more noble than incinerating hundreds of thousands of civilians? Shame on you. America deserves better than the likes of you.
 

Unkotare

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There are stories of Japanese children, sent into the mountains to escape the destruction of the cities.


Five short years. Yet in that time, much has changed. I began digging deeper into that war, visiting Hiroshima twice and gathering stories from those who were there.


This week marks 75 years since the world's first two nuclear bombs were detonated over the Japanese cities of Hiroshima and Nagasaki.(Wikipedia)
On one trip, I met a woman who was born in the same year as my dad, Kazuko san. She was spritely and healthy at 84 years old and had travelled two hours by train to meet me.

She, too, spent a few years in the mountains. She never wanted to forget and she was passionate about educating the next generations about evacuated children.

When I returned the following year to film a documentary, hoping to meet her again and get her story on camera, she was dead.

She had moved house, then gotten a mild cold, and that was it. The chance to look into the eyes of someone who had seen it, lived it, gone.
If you don't use quotation marks when quoting someone it is called plagiarism.
 

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