What's new
US Message Board 🦅 Political Discussion Forum

Register a free account today to become a member! Once signed in, you'll be able to participate on this site by adding your own topics and posts, as well as connect with other members through your own private inbox!

Solar Community In Ft. Meyers Florida Never Lost Power During Hurricane Ian

skews13

Diamond Member
Joined
Mar 18, 2017
Messages
7,609
Reaction score
8,195
Points
2,265
Babcock Ranch calls itself “America’s first solar-powered town.” Its nearby solar array — made up of 700,000 individual panels — generates more electricity than the 2,000-home neighborhood uses, in a state where most electricity is generated by burning natural gas, a planet-warming fossil fuel.


So when Hurricane Ian came barreling toward southwest Florida this week, it was a true test for the community. The storm obliterated the nearby Fort Myers and Naples areas with record-breaking surge and winds over 100 mph. It knocked out power to more than 2.6 million customers in the state, including 90% of Charlotte County.

But the lights stayed on in Babcock Ranch.



“We have proof of the case now because [the hurricane] came right over us,” Nancy Chorpenning, a 68-year-old Babcock Ranch resident, told CNN. “We have water, electricity, internet — and we may be the only people in Southwest Florida who are that fortunate.”

 

Bootney Lee Farnsworth

Diamond Member
Joined
Aug 15, 2017
Messages
46,063
Reaction score
29,733
Points
2,615
Location
Tejas
:laughing0301:

Lemme guess.

Wind REALLY did well.
 

Toddsterpatriot

Diamond Member
Joined
May 3, 2011
Messages
86,041
Reaction score
26,658
Points
2,250
Location
Chicago
Babcock Ranch calls itself “America’s first solar-powered town.” Its nearby solar array — made up of 700,000 individual panels — generates more electricity than the 2,000-home neighborhood uses, in a state where most electricity is generated by burning natural gas, a planet-warming fossil fuel.


So when Hurricane Ian came barreling toward southwest Florida this week, it was a true test for the community. The storm obliterated the nearby Fort Myers and Naples areas with record-breaking surge and winds over 100 mph. It knocked out power to more than 2.6 million customers in the state, including 90% of Charlotte County.

But the lights stayed on in Babcock Ranch.



“We have proof of the case now because [the hurricane] came right over us,” Nancy Chorpenning, a 68-year-old Babcock Ranch resident, told CNN. “We have water, electricity, internet — and we may be the only people in Southwest Florida who are that fortunate.”


How'd they light Babcock Ranch that night?
 

1srelluc

Diamond Member
Joined
Nov 21, 2021
Messages
20,106
Reaction score
27,279
Points
2,288
Location
Shenandoah Valley of Virginia
Nor did anyone with a generator with enough on-hand fuel to run it.

Generac goes burrrr. ;)
 

HereWeGoAgain

Diamond Member
Joined
Dec 15, 2010
Messages
81,928
Reaction score
31,624
Points
2,280
Location
Fuck Y'all I'm From Texas!
So they ran off of batteries.
Thats not really a huge accomplishment. If you live somewhere with buried lines you wont have a problem either.
And contrary to what Nancy had to say a lot of people didnt lose power and the storm ran right over them.
 

Billy_Bob

Diamond Member
Joined
Sep 4, 2014
Messages
30,265
Reaction score
19,500
Points
1,945
Location
Top Of The Great Divide
No. As the article states, the solar did really well. Of course you can send your snark to the people there. I'm sure they will find it amusing.
They lost 35% of their solar field. They ran off batteries...

This is not a major accomplishment. This is due to planning and preparation. The loss of the major section of the panel structures will cause problems for a year or so to come until they are repaired or otherwise replaced.
They also have underground power distribution. Again, someone did major planning. Going to have to go see who built this as no democrat plans ahead.
 
OP
skews13

skews13

Diamond Member
Joined
Mar 18, 2017
Messages
7,609
Reaction score
8,195
Points
2,265
They lost 35% of their solar field. They ran off batteries...

This is not a major accomplishment. This is due to planning and preparation. The loss of the major section of the panel structures will cause problems for a year or so to come until they are repaired or otherwise replaced.
They also have underground power distribution. Again, someone did major planning. Going to have to go see who built this as no democrat plans ahead.

“We have proof of the case now because [the hurricane] came right over us,” Nancy Chorpenning, a 68-year-old Babcock Ranch resident, told CNN. “We have water, electricity, internet — and we may be the only people in Southwest Florida who are that fortunate.”
 

SassyIrishLass

Diamond Member
Joined
Mar 31, 2009
Messages
80,961
Reaction score
49,456
Points
2,605
700,000 panels for 2000 homes. How many environmental disaster panels for say 2 million homes?

Cripes, you loons are not thinking ahead. You want a total EV fleet but there's not enough lithium in the world to do it. Let alone the power grid can't handle it
 

Natural Citizen

Diamond Member
Joined
Aug 8, 2016
Messages
20,371
Reaction score
16,551
Points
2,445
I'm surprised those panels help up in those winds, honestly.
 

evenflow1969

Gold Member
Joined
Jul 17, 2016
Messages
10,459
Reaction score
3,410
Points
210
Location
Ohio
Lol, evidently it is an accomplishment. They have all their utilities while the rest of Florida does not. Lol, bet they laughing at all the rest while they are comfortable.
 

WEATHER53

Diamond Member
Joined
Apr 13, 2017
Messages
20,381
Reaction score
10,607
Points
1,265
Technology has advanced so much that neither winds nor flood damages solar panels anymore .
I did not know that
 

toobfreak

Tungsten/Glass Member
Joined
Apr 29, 2017
Messages
59,383
Reaction score
49,636
Points
3,615
Location
On The Way Home To Earth

Solar Community In Ft. Meyers Florida Never Lost Power During Hurricane Ian​


Nope, they never lost it, it was still attached to what was left of their roof blown way down the street over in the next block.

Seems to me Florida really missed a golden opportunity there not having everyone on WIND power during the hurricane!
 

ThunderKiss1965

Platinum Member
Joined
Dec 17, 2015
Messages
11,583
Reaction score
4,649
Points
400
Location
GNO
Babcock Ranch calls itself “America’s first solar-powered town.” Its nearby solar array — made up of 700,000 individual panels — generates more electricity than the 2,000-home neighborhood uses, in a state where most electricity is generated by burning natural gas, a planet-warming fossil fuel.


So when Hurricane Ian came barreling toward southwest Florida this week, it was a true test for the community. The storm obliterated the nearby Fort Myers and Naples areas with record-breaking surge and winds over 100 mph. It knocked out power to more than 2.6 million customers in the state, including 90% of Charlotte County.

But the lights stayed on in Babcock Ranch.



“We have proof of the case now because [the hurricane] came right over us,” Nancy Chorpenning, a 68-year-old Babcock Ranch resident, told CNN. “We have water, electricity, internet — and we may be the only people in Southwest Florida who are that fortunate.”

700,000 panels ? Jesus how much acreage does that take up ?
 

Likkmee

Gold Member
Joined
Aug 24, 2015
Messages
17,503
Reaction score
6,533
Points
310
Location
Second World
Nope, they never lost it, it was still attached to what was left of their roof blown way down the street over in the next block.

Seems to me Florida really missed a golden opportunity there not having everyone on WIND power during the hurricane!
Windmills handle sustained 125-140. Gusting , not so much
 

EvilCat Breath

Diamond Member
Joined
Sep 23, 2016
Messages
64,200
Reaction score
39,679
Points
2,645
The ability to have power when the rest of the state did not has nothing to do with solar. It is because the power lines were underground. The city didn't flood because of solar power but because the streets were designed to channel flood waters. That's what a master planned community is like.
 

Tommy Tainant

Diamond Member
Joined
Jan 20, 2016
Messages
37,420
Reaction score
13,773
Points
1,560
Location
Y Cae Ras
Babcock Ranch calls itself “America’s first solar-powered town.” Its nearby solar array — made up of 700,000 individual panels — generates more electricity than the 2,000-home neighborhood uses, in a state where most electricity is generated by burning natural gas, a planet-warming fossil fuel.


So when Hurricane Ian came barreling toward southwest Florida this week, it was a true test for the community. The storm obliterated the nearby Fort Myers and Naples areas with record-breaking surge and winds over 100 mph. It knocked out power to more than 2.6 million customers in the state, including 90% of Charlotte County.

But the lights stayed on in Babcock Ranch.



“We have proof of the case now because [the hurricane] came right over us,” Nancy Chorpenning, a 68-year-old Babcock Ranch resident, told CNN. “We have water, electricity, internet — and we may be the only people in Southwest Florida who are that fortunate.”

The responses to this post show how effective exxons lying campaign has been. I doubt that these half wits even get paid.
 

Frankeneinstein

Gold Member
Joined
Dec 7, 2016
Messages
10,075
Reaction score
1,875
Points
290
Location
Stealing fire from the heavens

This 100% solar community endured Hurricane Ian with no loss of power and minimal damage​

Skews, starting with the headline which claims the town survived minimal damage [due to flood prevention road systems]...
... the entire article, when not being intentionally vague, is at best misleading and more accurately a puff piece designed to fool the socially educated...

all the article did was show that after a storm [and most nightfall] solar power can still work if the power lines are not affected...fossil fuels are keeping the lights on for 90% of Fla. right now, solar power cannot do that on its best day.
 
Last edited:

💲 Amazon Deals 💲

Forum List

Top