Seeds of Health and Beauty

freedombecki

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"Your blood test tells me that you are glucose intolerant," said his physician to my husband on Monday morning a week ago, "and you need to cut out breads, sugary desserts, potatoes, fried or baked snacks, pasta, and other starches that turn into sugar in the digestive tract."

After at least a week of looking up the term, it dawned on me that my retirement is over, we need a garden, and the exercise will not hurt him either. I've already received a few small packets of seeds I ordered, and am getting ready to put the bite on my brother and BIL to change the tractor mower for the tiller again, so I can tear up the thick grass covering the garden that failed 2 years ago when I came down with parathyroid issues and had to have surgery to fix it.

There are so many things to learn about gardening I've forgotten over the 30 years that I dedicated to quilting, which caused my green thumb to turn brown, so the learning has to be done all over again, but at least we're 5,000 feet closer to sea level here than at mile-high Wyoming where we spent 40 of the last 44 years.

One of the seeds I received is Purple Lead Plant, Amorpha Canescens. The seeds are under 2 millimeters in length or most likely, 16 end to end might make an inch. The plant has medical uses, I learned, wondering why someone would grow something with a name with "lead" in it. It's possible I found a butterfly that likes its nectar or uses it as a host plant to lay its eggs. It's been awhile since the seeds were ordered however, and I just don't remember what caused me to buy the seed or whether it was sent as a free packet since I bought 4 or more seed packets from the seller.

Here's what I found at Amorpha canescens Lead Plant PFAF Plant Database:

.​
.​
"An infusion of the leaves makes a pleasant tasting yellow tea. An infusion of the leaves has been used to kill pinworms or any intestinal worms. The infusion is also used to treat eczema, the report does not say it if is used internally or externally. The dried and powdered leaves are applied as a salve to cuts and open wounds. A decoction of the root is used to treat stomach pains. A moxa of the twigs has been used in the treatment of neuralgia and rheumatism."​
.​
It sounds like it's totally antibiotic to germs and tiny critters nobody wants to know up close and personal. :)
This should be a very interesting plant, if I can get some of the seeds to grow, that is.​
.​
Source of picture: Arboretum Nature Notes
 
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drifter

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Good luck on your gardening, I bet you are glad to be out of Wyoming right now, sounds like you are in warmer weather. :)
 
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freedombecki

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Thanks, drifter. I loved the people of Wyoming. But the Wyoming weather didn't like me. :(
 
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freedombecki

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Sunflower​
Helianthus annuus
.​
Sunflower seed nutrition facts

Sweet, nutty sunflower seeds are an excellent source of calories, essential fatty acids, vitamins, and minerals. The seeds are mainly employed in the extraction of edible oil at a commercial scale all over the world. Its seeds are eaten as delicious snacks by humans and birds alike!
Sunflower plant is a tall, erect, herbaceous annual plant belonging to the family of Asteraceae of the genus, Helianthus. Its botanical name is Helianthus annuus. It is native to Middle American region from where it spread as an important commercial crop all over the world by the European explorers. At present, Russian Union, China, The USA, and Argentina are the leading producers of sunflower crop. [/QUOTE]

The Sunflower's nutrition, links and credits are at this page: Sunflower seeds nutrition facts and health benefits

In the vitamin RDA Charts, a number of nutritional dividends of the sunflower seeds got my attention from eating 100g (~3.53 oz.): Sunflower seeds are high in Vitamin E and Copper; B1, B6, Copper, Magnesium, Manganese, Iron, Phosphorus, Selenium, and Zinc. And many nutrients in smaller percentages. It has a phytonutrient count of Carotene (30 µg)



 
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freedombecki

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Hey, Ms. b... look into "heirloom seeds".
Thanks, Mr. H.

I'm reading from--the inscriptions on heirloom seeds I found on ebay. I'm trying to do one a day, but my brother died this morning, so it may be iffy. Feel free to add some of your own favorites. I found merchants selling seeds for .99 cents with free shipping, so more are on the way. They were nicee enough to print sowing information on the tiny packets. I hope this isn't another all-talk and no dig garden year. :lol:
 
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freedombecki

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Sumter Cucumber (for pickling)​
Cucumis sativus
These words of wisdom about the Cucumber come from "Nutrition and You."​
Health benefits of Cucumber


  • It is one of the very low calorie vegetables; provide just 15 calories per 100 g. It contains no saturated fats or cholesterol. Cucumber peel is a good source of dietary fiber that helps reduce constipation, and offer some protection against colon cancers by eliminating toxic compounds from the gut.
  • It is a very good source of potassium, an important intracellular electrolyte. 100 g of cucumber provides 147 mg of potassium but only 2 mg of sodium. Potassium is a heart friendly electrolyte helps bring a reduction in total blood pressure and heart rates by countering effects of sodium.
  • Cucumbers contains unique anti-oxidants in moderate ratios such as β-carotene and α-carotene, vitamin-C, vitamin-A, zea-xanthin and lutein. These compounds help act as protective scavengers against oxygen-derived free radicals and reactive oxygen species (ROS) that play a role in aging and various disease processes. Their total antioxidant strength, measured in terms of oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC value), is 214 µmol TE/100 g.
  • Cucumbers have mild diuretic property, which perhaps attributed to their free-water, and potassium and low sodium content. This helps in checking weight gain and high blood pressure.
  • They surprisingly have a high amount of vitamin K, provides about 17 µg of this vitamin per 100 g. Vitamin-K has been found to have a potential role in bone strength by promoting osteotrophic (bone mass building) activity. It also has established role in the treatment of Alzheimer's disease patients by limiting neuronal damage in their brain.
So if someone you know is at risk for high blood pressure, osteoporosis, or Alzheimer's, Cucumber is da man in nutritional fight against the three and a few others. No wonder Hollywood stars covered their faces with cucumbers back when. ;)

These cucumbers must be self-starters, because they came in a package with other "heirloom seeds."

Life is so good when you're dreaming about gardening in the anticipated warmer weather from winter's doldrums.
 

JakeStarkey

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"Your blood test tells me that you are glucose intolerant," said his physician to my husband on Monday morning a week ago, "and you need to cut out breads, sugary desserts, potatoes, fried or baked snacks, pasta, and other starches that turn into sugar in the digestive tract."

After at least a week of looking up the term, it dawned on me that my retirement is over, we need a garden, and the exercise will not hurt him either. I've already received a few small packets of seeds I ordered, and am getting ready to put the bite on my brother and BIL to change the tractor mower for the tiller again, so I can tear up the thick grass covering the garden that failed 2 years ago when I came down with parathyroid issues and had to have surgery to fix it.

There are so many things to learn about gardening I've forgotten over the 30 years that I dedicated to quilting, which caused my green thumb to turn brown, so the learning has to be done all over again, but at least we're 5,000 feet closer to sea level here than at mile-high Wyoming where we spent 40 of the last 44 years.

One of the seeds I received is Purple Lead Plant, Amorpha Canescens. The seeds are under 2 millimeters in length or most likely, 16 end to end might make an inch. The plant has medical uses, I learned, wondering why someone would grow something with a name with "lead" in it. It's possible I found a butterfly that likes its nectar or uses it as a host plant to lay its eggs. It's been awhile since the seeds were ordered however, and I just don't remember what caused me to buy the seed or whether it was sent as a free packet since I bought 4 or more seed packets from the seller.

Here's what I found at Amorpha canescens Lead Plant PFAF Plant Database:

.​
.​
"An infusion of the leaves makes a pleasant tasting yellow tea. An infusion of the leaves has been used to kill pinworms or any intestinal worms. The infusion is also used to treat eczema, the report does not say it if is used internally or externally. The dried and powdered leaves are applied as a salve to cuts and open wounds. A decoction of the root is used to treat stomach pains. A moxa of the twigs has been used in the treatment of neuralgia and rheumatism."​
.​
It sounds like it's totally antibiotic to germs and tiny critters nobody wants to know up close and personal. :)
This should be a very interesting plant, if I can get some of the seeds to grow, that is.​
.​
Source of picture: Arboretum Nature Notes
That is so cool.
 

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