Im going to buy a hand gun soon. Any suggestions?

White 6

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It would be bad to have to shoot somebody trying to come in, but the first round should be able to stop the problem dead in their tracks. For home defense with people untrained, I really favor a 12 gauge.
I like to think that just the sound of it being racked would be enough to chase off an intruder.
Only a fool waits until a break in to load his gun.
Gotta admit, everything in every closet is loaded and chambered. There will be no feed jamb of any type on the first trigger pull.
 

White 6

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I agree with Winter on the .357 revolver. You said one gun; for defense, range, and fun. That’ll do the job across all those spectrums. However, what I suggest additionally, is that you don’t run out and buy whatever gun everyone says is great, because their new favorite movie hero uses it. Go to a good gun range. A good gun range will rent you guns. Try quite a few, and see what fits your hand, suits you best, and you shoot best with. When it comes to guns, try as manufacturers may; one size does not fit all...
357 for some one inexperienced? realy? weildy and to powerfull for most.
My girlfriend got a .357 as her first gun. She does most of her practicing with .38 Special, and then fires at least 12 rounds of the .357 ammo we have for defense.

She is not tiny, but it is not uncontrollable in any way. Even in a 2" S&W she handles it well.
All I here is the part where she uses the 38 special the most. kinda proving my point. I know when I go to do a job I use the tool I am most comfortable with, which is why I prescibe the 38 to start also a revolver leaves no evidence behind is easier to clean, use, and jams way less often. Most guns are used inside of ten foot and the 38 is more than powerfull enough at this distance.. I personally prefer the 45 but I have a great deal of experience.
She uses .38 special because they are cheaper and the lower recoil means it is comfortable at the range. I am willing to bet, if someone is in your house in the middle of the night, you won't feel the recoil. Plus, I doubt you will fire 50 to 75 rounds at an intruder.
the laws of physics do not stop under durress if any thing they are multiplied. An inexperienced shooter in times of stress is more likely to miss the first shot. The more recoil the more time it takes to reaim and shoot again. I can tell you this some one comes in home at night my 45 and my dog is going is make it real tough for them. As far as shooting alot of bullets, kinda supporting my revolver theory. Further more the less expense of the 38 shell makes practice cheaper and practice build confidence and profincey. When the bullets start flying you want what you are most experienced with. If you are going to carry it on the block even more reason for the revolver. There are situations where you might not want to leave cartriges behind. A revolver solves a multitude of problems.
As I said earlier, all of our revolvers are loaded with a .38 Special shotshell in the first chamber. Lower recoil and far less chance of a miss. Then the intruder is shocked and hurting from the pellets, so the next round goes on target.
Unless he's on pcp.
It would be bad to have to shoot somebody trying to come in, but the first round should be able to stop the problem dead in their tracks. For home defense with people untrained, I really favor a 12 gauge.
Not a big fan of a long gun in close quarters.
You can shorten em up a lot but that means you lose the stock which hampers aiming.
Don't think close quarters. You ain't clearing rooms after kicking in a door. Think home defense. If they are close enough for it to be a problem, you already messed up. Not a problem in your own home. You know where the impediments are in the dark already. They don't. Buckshot is just smaller than 22 shorts, except there is a bunch of them. If shooting in the house, it will go through fewer walls than any .38 or higher pistol (safer), and you have a better aim and control, especially by the way it is held. The untrained are often sloppy in the way they hold and sight pistols, and shooting isn't like on TV. If you try it over things and around corners aiming in a general direction with a pistol, you can empty a 15 round magazine down a 4 ft wide hallway and never hit a thing. Steadiest to aim is most likely to solve your home defense problem. A .20 gauge will actually do, and it is light enough and with so little recoil, the most petite wife or significant other can handle it also. Nothing beats the knock down power of buckshot in a shotgun. Check out Paul Harrell on YouTube. comparing weaponry on the "meat target" He has forgotten more than I will ever know. He's the professional. I am just a semi-talented amateur. His video comparisons are excellent.
 

HereWeGoAgain

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I agree with Winter on the .357 revolver. You said one gun; for defense, range, and fun. That’ll do the job across all those spectrums. However, what I suggest additionally, is that you don’t run out and buy whatever gun everyone says is great, because their new favorite movie hero uses it. Go to a good gun range. A good gun range will rent you guns. Try quite a few, and see what fits your hand, suits you best, and you shoot best with. When it comes to guns, try as manufacturers may; one size does not fit all...
357 for some one inexperienced? realy? weildy and to powerfull for most.
My girlfriend got a .357 as her first gun. She does most of her practicing with .38 Special, and then fires at least 12 rounds of the .357 ammo we have for defense.

She is not tiny, but it is not uncontrollable in any way. Even in a 2" S&W she handles it well.
All I here is the part where she uses the 38 special the most. kinda proving my point. I know when I go to do a job I use the tool I am most comfortable with, which is why I prescibe the 38 to start also a revolver leaves no evidence behind is easier to clean, use, and jams way less often. Most guns are used inside of ten foot and the 38 is more than powerfull enough at this distance.. I personally prefer the 45 but I have a great deal of experience.
She uses .38 special because they are cheaper and the lower recoil means it is comfortable at the range. I am willing to bet, if someone is in your house in the middle of the night, you won't feel the recoil. Plus, I doubt you will fire 50 to 75 rounds at an intruder.
the laws of physics do not stop under durress if any thing they are multiplied. An inexperienced shooter in times of stress is more likely to miss the first shot. The more recoil the more time it takes to reaim and shoot again. I can tell you this some one comes in home at night my 45 and my dog is going is make it real tough for them. As far as shooting alot of bullets, kinda supporting my revolver theory. Further more the less expense of the 38 shell makes practice cheaper and practice build confidence and profincey. When the bullets start flying you want what you are most experienced with. If you are going to carry it on the block even more reason for the revolver. There are situations where you might not want to leave cartriges behind. A revolver solves a multitude of problems.
As I said earlier, all of our revolvers are loaded with a .38 Special shotshell in the first chamber. Lower recoil and far less chance of a miss. Then the intruder is shocked and hurting from the pellets, so the next round goes on target.
Unless he's on pcp.
It would be bad to have to shoot somebody trying to come in, but the first round should be able to stop the problem dead in their tracks. For home defense with people untrained, I really favor a 12 gauge.
Not a big fan of a long gun in close quarters.
You can shorten em up a lot but that means you lose the stock which hampers aiming.
Don't think close quarters. You ain't clearing rooms after kicking in a door. Think home defense. If they are close enough for it to be a problem, you already messed up. Not a problem in your own home. You know where the impediments are in the dark already. They don't. Buckshot is just smaller than 22 shorts, except there is a bunch of them. If shooting in the house, it will go through fewer walls than any .38 or higher pistol (safer), and you have a better aim and control, especially by the way it is held. The untrained are often sloppy in the way they hold and sight pistols, and shooting isn't like on TV. If you try it over things and around corners aiming in a general direction with a pistol, you can empty a 15 round magazine down a 4 ft wide hallway and never hit a thing. Steadiest to aim is most likely to solve your home defense problem. A .20 gauge will actually do, and it is light enough and with so little recoil, the most petite wife or significant other can handle it also. Nothing beats the knock down power of buckshot in a shotgun. Check out Paul Harrell on YouTube. comparing weaponry on the "meat target" He has forgotten more than I will ever know. He's the professional. I am just a semi-talented amateur. His video comparisons are excellent.
Nope.
Buck shot is far bigger than a .22 at .330 diameter and it will travel through several interior walls.
And dont tell me what shooting is like.
My Wife had a 12 when I met her,and still does, and can shoot beer cans out of the air from the hip.
 

Quasar44

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I have never owned a gun as an adult, and im 47 now. Well, thats not true. I have my grandfathers Luger from WW2 that he found on a Nazi on D-Day. He was one of the legendary 101st Airborne paratroopers. Its a super cool gun to have, with a leather case that is very well maintained. Anyway, I also had a rifle when i was a kid and my dad had a very large gun collection that i LOVED! I was always fascinated by guns, i just never bought any as an adult. I have decided that im going to buy one now.

What do i want a gun for? First off, I would like to be able to kill a hostile intruder that enters my home. I dont think that is a very likely scenario, but i want that ability nonetheless. Im 5'9, 170 lbs, so im not looking for a big ass Dirty Harry style gun. I want something lighter, but with enough power to take an intruder down with accuracy. I figure a 9 mm is the best choice for me. Yes a shotgun is probably THE best home protection weapon, but i still want a 9 mm.

The second, and most important reason why i want to buy a gun is because, i want to have fun at gun ranges. Thats it. Im basically buying a gun for fun. Home protection is merely a bonus.

My favorite gun of all time is the HK MP5. Ive been a big fan of HK's forever. I cant buy one of those because they are fully automatic, but there is the HK SP5 version for civilians. Its nearly $3,000 though, and i dont think i can justify that kind of spending, unless i get really hooked on gun shooting, at which point i might expand on my collection.

I have pretty much decided that i want an HK pistol. From my research, the HK VP9 is one of the best 9mm out there. Do you guys have other suggestions? If you can find me a cooler pistol than that, i welcome any suggestions.
M4 semi auto shotgun
Used by the marines
It’s a killer
Cost is 2 grand
 

Quasar44

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I agree with Winter on the .357 revolver. You said one gun; for defense, range, and fun. That’ll do the job across all those spectrums. However, what I suggest additionally, is that you don’t run out and buy whatever gun everyone says is great, because their new favorite movie hero uses it. Go to a good gun range. A good gun range will rent you guns. Try quite a few, and see what fits your hand, suits you best, and you shoot best with. When it comes to guns, try as manufacturers may; one size does not fit all...
357 for some one inexperienced? realy? weildy and to powerfull for most.
My girlfriend got a .357 as her first gun. She does most of her practicing with .38 Special, and then fires at least 12 rounds of the .357 ammo we have for defense.

She is not tiny, but it is not uncontrollable in any way. Even in a 2" S&W she handles it well.
All I here is the part where she uses the 38 special the most. kinda proving my point. I know when I go to do a job I use the tool I am most comfortable with, which is why I prescibe the 38 to start also a revolver leaves no evidence behind is easier to clean, use, and jams way less often. Most guns are used inside of ten foot and the 38 is more than powerfull enough at this distance.. I personally prefer the 45 but I have a great deal of experience.
She uses .38 special because they are cheaper and the lower recoil means it is comfortable at the range. I am willing to bet, if someone is in your house in the middle of the night, you won't feel the recoil. Plus, I doubt you will fire 50 to 75 rounds at an intruder.
the laws of physics do not stop under durress if any thing they are multiplied. An inexperienced shooter in times of stress is more likely to miss the first shot. The more recoil the more time it takes to reaim and shoot again. I can tell you this some one comes in home at night my 45 and my dog is going is make it real tough for them. As far as shooting alot of bullets, kinda supporting my revolver theory. Further more the less expense of the 38 shell makes practice cheaper and practice build confidence and profincey. When the bullets start flying you want what you are most experienced with. If you are going to carry it on the block even more reason for the revolver. There are situations where you might not want to leave cartriges behind. A revolver solves a multitude of problems.
As I said earlier, all of our revolvers are loaded with a .38 Special shotshell in the first chamber. Lower recoil and far less chance of a miss. Then the intruder is shocked and hurting from the pellets, so the next round goes on target.
Unless he's on pcp.
It would be bad to have to shoot somebody trying to come in, but the first round should be able to stop the problem dead in their tracks. For home defense with people untrained, I really favor a 12 gauge.
Not a big fan of a long gun in close quarters.
You can shorten em up a lot but that means you lose the stock which hampers aiming.
Don't think close quarters. You ain't clearing rooms after kicking in a door. Think home defense. If they are close enough for it to be a problem, you already messed up. Not a problem in your own home. You know where the impediments are in the dark already. They don't. Buckshot is just smaller than 22 shorts, except there is a bunch of them. If shooting in the house, it will go through fewer walls than any .38 or higher pistol (safer), and you have a better aim and control, especially by the way it is held. The untrained are often sloppy in the way they hold and sight pistols, and shooting isn't like on TV. If you try it over things and around corners aiming in a general direction with a pistol, you can empty a 15 round magazine down a 4 ft wide hallway and never hit a thing. Steadiest to aim is most likely to solve your home defense problem. A .20 gauge will actually do, and it is light enough and with so little recoil, the most petite wife or significant other can handle it also. Nothing beats the knock down power of buckshot in a shotgun. Check out Paul Harrell on YouTube. comparing weaponry on the "meat target" He has forgotten more than I will ever know. He's the professional. I am just a semi-talented amateur. His video comparisons are excellent.
Nope.
Buck shot is far bigger than a .22 at .330 diameter and it will travel through several interior walls.
And dont tell me what shooting is like.
My Wife had a 12 when I met her,and still does, and can shoot beer cans out of the air from the hip.
will #4 buck shot also travel through walls ??
 

WinterBorn

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I have never owned a gun as an adult, and im 47 now. Well, thats not true. I have my grandfathers Luger from WW2 that he found on a Nazi on D-Day. He was one of the legendary 101st Airborne paratroopers. Its a super cool gun to have, with a leather case that is very well maintained. Anyway, I also had a rifle when i was a kid and my dad had a very large gun collection that i LOVED! I was always fascinated by guns, i just never bought any as an adult. I have decided that im going to buy one now.

What do i want a gun for? First off, I would like to be able to kill a hostile intruder that enters my home. I dont think that is a very likely scenario, but i want that ability nonetheless. Im 5'9, 170 lbs, so im not looking for a big ass Dirty Harry style gun. I want something lighter, but with enough power to take an intruder down with accuracy. I figure a 9 mm is the best choice for me. Yes a shotgun is probably THE best home protection weapon, but i still want a 9 mm.

The second, and most important reason why i want to buy a gun is because, i want to have fun at gun ranges. Thats it. Im basically buying a gun for fun. Home protection is merely a bonus.

My favorite gun of all time is the HK MP5. Ive been a big fan of HK's forever. I cant buy one of those because they are fully automatic, but there is the HK SP5 version for civilians. Its nearly $3,000 though, and i dont think i can justify that kind of spending, unless i get really hooked on gun shooting, at which point i might expand on my collection.

I have pretty much decided that i want an HK pistol. From my research, the HK VP9 is one of the best 9mm out there. Do you guys have other suggestions? If you can find me a cooler pistol than that, i welcome any suggestions.
M4 semi auto shotgun
Used by the marines
It’s a killer
Cost is 2 grand
The M4 is a great shotgun. And pretty reliable. But any semi auto is more likely to have a malfunction.

As good as the M4 is, I like a Remington 870 for the function.
 

Vastator

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I agree with Winter on the .357 revolver. You said one gun; for defense, range, and fun. That’ll do the job across all those spectrums. However, what I suggest additionally, is that you don’t run out and buy whatever gun everyone says is great, because their new favorite movie hero uses it. Go to a good gun range. A good gun range will rent you guns. Try quite a few, and see what fits your hand, suits you best, and you shoot best with. When it comes to guns, try as manufacturers may; one size does not fit all...
357 for some one inexperienced? realy? weildy and to powerfull for most.
My girlfriend got a .357 as her first gun. She does most of her practicing with .38 Special, and then fires at least 12 rounds of the .357 ammo we have for defense.

She is not tiny, but it is not uncontrollable in any way. Even in a 2" S&W she handles it well.
All I here is the part where she uses the 38 special the most. kinda proving my point. I know when I go to do a job I use the tool I am most comfortable with, which is why I prescibe the 38 to start also a revolver leaves no evidence behind is easier to clean, use, and jams way less often. Most guns are used inside of ten foot and the 38 is more than powerfull enough at this distance.. I personally prefer the 45 but I have a great deal of experience.
She uses .38 special because they are cheaper and the lower recoil means it is comfortable at the range. I am willing to bet, if someone is in your house in the middle of the night, you won't feel the recoil. Plus, I doubt you will fire 50 to 75 rounds at an intruder.
the laws of physics do not stop under durress if any thing they are multiplied. An inexperienced shooter in times of stress is more likely to miss the first shot. The more recoil the more time it takes to reaim and shoot again. I can tell you this some one comes in home at night my 45 and my dog is going is make it real tough for them. As far as shooting alot of bullets, kinda supporting my revolver theory. Further more the less expense of the 38 shell makes practice cheaper and practice build confidence and profincey. When the bullets start flying you want what you are most experienced with. If you are going to carry it on the block even more reason for the revolver. There are situations where you might not want to leave cartriges behind. A revolver solves a multitude of problems.
As I said earlier, all of our revolvers are loaded with a .38 Special shotshell in the first chamber. Lower recoil and far less chance of a miss. Then the intruder is shocked and hurting from the pellets, so the next round goes on target.
Unless he's on pcp.
It would be bad to have to shoot somebody trying to come in, but the first round should be able to stop the problem dead in their tracks. For home defense with people untrained, I really favor a 12 gauge.
Not a big fan of a long gun in close quarters.
You can shorten em up a lot but that means you lose the stock which hampers aiming.
Don't think close quarters. You ain't clearing rooms after kicking in a door. Think home defense. If they are close enough for it to be a problem, you already messed up. Not a problem in your own home. You know where the impediments are in the dark already. They don't. Buckshot is just smaller than 22 shorts, except there is a bunch of them. If shooting in the house, it will go through fewer walls than any .38 or higher pistol (safer), and you have a better aim and control, especially by the way it is held. The untrained are often sloppy in the way they hold and sight pistols, and shooting isn't like on TV. If you try it over things and around corners aiming in a general direction with a pistol, you can empty a 15 round magazine down a 4 ft wide hallway and never hit a thing. Steadiest to aim is most likely to solve your home defense problem. A .20 gauge will actually do, and it is light enough and with so little recoil, the most petite wife or significant other can handle it also. Nothing beats the knock down power of buckshot in a shotgun. Check out Paul Harrell on YouTube. comparing weaponry on the "meat target" He has forgotten more than I will ever know. He's the professional. I am just a semi-talented amateur. His video comparisons are excellent.
Nope.
Buck shot is far bigger than a .22 at .330 diameter and it will travel through several interior walls.
And dont tell me what shooting is like.
My Wife had a 12 when I met her,and still does, and can shoot beer cans out of the air from the hip.
will #4 buck shot also travel through walls ??
Here are some informative videos for you to watch regarding your questions on shotguns, and home defense. If you’re really interested in the topic I suggest you peruse the rest of Paul’s video cache, as he posts very educational real world information on the subject.




 

HereWeGoAgain

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I agree with Winter on the .357 revolver. You said one gun; for defense, range, and fun. That’ll do the job across all those spectrums. However, what I suggest additionally, is that you don’t run out and buy whatever gun everyone says is great, because their new favorite movie hero uses it. Go to a good gun range. A good gun range will rent you guns. Try quite a few, and see what fits your hand, suits you best, and you shoot best with. When it comes to guns, try as manufacturers may; one size does not fit all...
357 for some one inexperienced? realy? weildy and to powerfull for most.
My girlfriend got a .357 as her first gun. She does most of her practicing with .38 Special, and then fires at least 12 rounds of the .357 ammo we have for defense.

She is not tiny, but it is not uncontrollable in any way. Even in a 2" S&W she handles it well.
All I here is the part where she uses the 38 special the most. kinda proving my point. I know when I go to do a job I use the tool I am most comfortable with, which is why I prescibe the 38 to start also a revolver leaves no evidence behind is easier to clean, use, and jams way less often. Most guns are used inside of ten foot and the 38 is more than powerfull enough at this distance.. I personally prefer the 45 but I have a great deal of experience.
She uses .38 special because they are cheaper and the lower recoil means it is comfortable at the range. I am willing to bet, if someone is in your house in the middle of the night, you won't feel the recoil. Plus, I doubt you will fire 50 to 75 rounds at an intruder.
the laws of physics do not stop under durress if any thing they are multiplied. An inexperienced shooter in times of stress is more likely to miss the first shot. The more recoil the more time it takes to reaim and shoot again. I can tell you this some one comes in home at night my 45 and my dog is going is make it real tough for them. As far as shooting alot of bullets, kinda supporting my revolver theory. Further more the less expense of the 38 shell makes practice cheaper and practice build confidence and profincey. When the bullets start flying you want what you are most experienced with. If you are going to carry it on the block even more reason for the revolver. There are situations where you might not want to leave cartriges behind. A revolver solves a multitude of problems.
As I said earlier, all of our revolvers are loaded with a .38 Special shotshell in the first chamber. Lower recoil and far less chance of a miss. Then the intruder is shocked and hurting from the pellets, so the next round goes on target.
Unless he's on pcp.
It would be bad to have to shoot somebody trying to come in, but the first round should be able to stop the problem dead in their tracks. For home defense with people untrained, I really favor a 12 gauge.
Not a big fan of a long gun in close quarters.
You can shorten em up a lot but that means you lose the stock which hampers aiming.
Don't think close quarters. You ain't clearing rooms after kicking in a door. Think home defense. If they are close enough for it to be a problem, you already messed up. Not a problem in your own home. You know where the impediments are in the dark already. They don't. Buckshot is just smaller than 22 shorts, except there is a bunch of them. If shooting in the house, it will go through fewer walls than any .38 or higher pistol (safer), and you have a better aim and control, especially by the way it is held. The untrained are often sloppy in the way they hold and sight pistols, and shooting isn't like on TV. If you try it over things and around corners aiming in a general direction with a pistol, you can empty a 15 round magazine down a 4 ft wide hallway and never hit a thing. Steadiest to aim is most likely to solve your home defense problem. A .20 gauge will actually do, and it is light enough and with so little recoil, the most petite wife or significant other can handle it also. Nothing beats the knock down power of buckshot in a shotgun. Check out Paul Harrell on YouTube. comparing weaponry on the "meat target" He has forgotten more than I will ever know. He's the professional. I am just a semi-talented amateur. His video comparisons are excellent.
Nope.
Buck shot is far bigger than a .22 at .330 diameter and it will travel through several interior walls.
And dont tell me what shooting is like.
My Wife had a 12 when I met her,and still does, and can shoot beer cans out of the air from the hip.
will #4 buck shot also travel through walls ??
Yes.
 

HereWeGoAgain

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I agree with Winter on the .357 revolver. You said one gun; for defense, range, and fun. That’ll do the job across all those spectrums. However, what I suggest additionally, is that you don’t run out and buy whatever gun everyone says is great, because their new favorite movie hero uses it. Go to a good gun range. A good gun range will rent you guns. Try quite a few, and see what fits your hand, suits you best, and you shoot best with. When it comes to guns, try as manufacturers may; one size does not fit all...
357 for some one inexperienced? realy? weildy and to powerfull for most.
My girlfriend got a .357 as her first gun. She does most of her practicing with .38 Special, and then fires at least 12 rounds of the .357 ammo we have for defense.

She is not tiny, but it is not uncontrollable in any way. Even in a 2" S&W she handles it well.
All I here is the part where she uses the 38 special the most. kinda proving my point. I know when I go to do a job I use the tool I am most comfortable with, which is why I prescibe the 38 to start also a revolver leaves no evidence behind is easier to clean, use, and jams way less often. Most guns are used inside of ten foot and the 38 is more than powerfull enough at this distance.. I personally prefer the 45 but I have a great deal of experience.
She uses .38 special because they are cheaper and the lower recoil means it is comfortable at the range. I am willing to bet, if someone is in your house in the middle of the night, you won't feel the recoil. Plus, I doubt you will fire 50 to 75 rounds at an intruder.
the laws of physics do not stop under durress if any thing they are multiplied. An inexperienced shooter in times of stress is more likely to miss the first shot. The more recoil the more time it takes to reaim and shoot again. I can tell you this some one comes in home at night my 45 and my dog is going is make it real tough for them. As far as shooting alot of bullets, kinda supporting my revolver theory. Further more the less expense of the 38 shell makes practice cheaper and practice build confidence and profincey. When the bullets start flying you want what you are most experienced with. If you are going to carry it on the block even more reason for the revolver. There are situations where you might not want to leave cartriges behind. A revolver solves a multitude of problems.
As I said earlier, all of our revolvers are loaded with a .38 Special shotshell in the first chamber. Lower recoil and far less chance of a miss. Then the intruder is shocked and hurting from the pellets, so the next round goes on target.
Unless he's on pcp.
It would be bad to have to shoot somebody trying to come in, but the first round should be able to stop the problem dead in their tracks. For home defense with people untrained, I really favor a 12 gauge.
Not a big fan of a long gun in close quarters.
You can shorten em up a lot but that means you lose the stock which hampers aiming.
Don't think close quarters. You ain't clearing rooms after kicking in a door. Think home defense. If they are close enough for it to be a problem, you already messed up. Not a problem in your own home. You know where the impediments are in the dark already. They don't. Buckshot is just smaller than 22 shorts, except there is a bunch of them. If shooting in the house, it will go through fewer walls than any .38 or higher pistol (safer), and you have a better aim and control, especially by the way it is held. The untrained are often sloppy in the way they hold and sight pistols, and shooting isn't like on TV. If you try it over things and around corners aiming in a general direction with a pistol, you can empty a 15 round magazine down a 4 ft wide hallway and never hit a thing. Steadiest to aim is most likely to solve your home defense problem. A .20 gauge will actually do, and it is light enough and with so little recoil, the most petite wife or significant other can handle it also. Nothing beats the knock down power of buckshot in a shotgun. Check out Paul Harrell on YouTube. comparing weaponry on the "meat target" He has forgotten more than I will ever know. He's the professional. I am just a semi-talented amateur. His video comparisons are excellent.
Nope.
Buck shot is far bigger than a .22 at .330 diameter and it will travel through several interior walls.
And dont tell me what shooting is like.
My Wife had a 12 when I met her,and still does, and can shoot beer cans out of the air from the hip.
will #4 buck shot also travel through walls ??
Here are some informative videos for you to watch regarding your questions on shotguns, and home defense. If you’re really interested in the topic I suggest you peruse the rest of Paul’s video cache, as he posts very educational real world information on the subject.




Yeah...
He has some good info.
 

justinacolmena

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never owned a gun as an adult
Keep it that way, at least officially.

There are plans for a machinist, or anyone willing to learn basic machining or metal working skills, to make and build a 1911-style automatic pistol.
 

Vastator

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I agree with Winter on the .357 revolver. You said one gun; for defense, range, and fun. That’ll do the job across all those spectrums. However, what I suggest additionally, is that you don’t run out and buy whatever gun everyone says is great, because their new favorite movie hero uses it. Go to a good gun range. A good gun range will rent you guns. Try quite a few, and see what fits your hand, suits you best, and you shoot best with. When it comes to guns, try as manufacturers may; one size does not fit all...
357 for some one inexperienced? realy? weildy and to powerfull for most.
My girlfriend got a .357 as her first gun. She does most of her practicing with .38 Special, and then fires at least 12 rounds of the .357 ammo we have for defense.

She is not tiny, but it is not uncontrollable in any way. Even in a 2" S&W she handles it well.
All I here is the part where she uses the 38 special the most. kinda proving my point. I know when I go to do a job I use the tool I am most comfortable with, which is why I prescibe the 38 to start also a revolver leaves no evidence behind is easier to clean, use, and jams way less often. Most guns are used inside of ten foot and the 38 is more than powerfull enough at this distance.. I personally prefer the 45 but I have a great deal of experience.
She uses .38 special because they are cheaper and the lower recoil means it is comfortable at the range. I am willing to bet, if someone is in your house in the middle of the night, you won't feel the recoil. Plus, I doubt you will fire 50 to 75 rounds at an intruder.
the laws of physics do not stop under durress if any thing they are multiplied. An inexperienced shooter in times of stress is more likely to miss the first shot. The more recoil the more time it takes to reaim and shoot again. I can tell you this some one comes in home at night my 45 and my dog is going is make it real tough for them. As far as shooting alot of bullets, kinda supporting my revolver theory. Further more the less expense of the 38 shell makes practice cheaper and practice build confidence and profincey. When the bullets start flying you want what you are most experienced with. If you are going to carry it on the block even more reason for the revolver. There are situations where you might not want to leave cartriges behind. A revolver solves a multitude of problems.
As I said earlier, all of our revolvers are loaded with a .38 Special shotshell in the first chamber. Lower recoil and far less chance of a miss. Then the intruder is shocked and hurting from the pellets, so the next round goes on target.
Unless he's on pcp.
It would be bad to have to shoot somebody trying to come in, but the first round should be able to stop the problem dead in their tracks. For home defense with people untrained, I really favor a 12 gauge.
Not a big fan of a long gun in close quarters.
You can shorten em up a lot but that means you lose the stock which hampers aiming.
Don't think close quarters. You ain't clearing rooms after kicking in a door. Think home defense. If they are close enough for it to be a problem, you already messed up. Not a problem in your own home. You know where the impediments are in the dark already. They don't. Buckshot is just smaller than 22 shorts, except there is a bunch of them. If shooting in the house, it will go through fewer walls than any .38 or higher pistol (safer), and you have a better aim and control, especially by the way it is held. The untrained are often sloppy in the way they hold and sight pistols, and shooting isn't like on TV. If you try it over things and around corners aiming in a general direction with a pistol, you can empty a 15 round magazine down a 4 ft wide hallway and never hit a thing. Steadiest to aim is most likely to solve your home defense problem. A .20 gauge will actually do, and it is light enough and with so little recoil, the most petite wife or significant other can handle it also. Nothing beats the knock down power of buckshot in a shotgun. Check out Paul Harrell on YouTube. comparing weaponry on the "meat target" He has forgotten more than I will ever know. He's the professional. I am just a semi-talented amateur. His video comparisons are excellent.
Nope.
Buck shot is far bigger than a .22 at .330 diameter and it will travel through several interior walls.
And dont tell me what shooting is like.
My Wife had a 12 when I met her,and still does, and can shoot beer cans out of the air from the hip.
will #4 buck shot also travel through walls ??
Here are some informative videos for you to watch regarding your questions on shotguns, and home defense. If you’re really interested in the topic I suggest you peruse the rest of Paul’s video cache, as he posts very educational real world information on the subject.




Yeah...
He has some good info.
I’m sensing a “ya but“..?
 

HereWeGoAgain

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I agree with Winter on the .357 revolver. You said one gun; for defense, range, and fun. That’ll do the job across all those spectrums. However, what I suggest additionally, is that you don’t run out and buy whatever gun everyone says is great, because their new favorite movie hero uses it. Go to a good gun range. A good gun range will rent you guns. Try quite a few, and see what fits your hand, suits you best, and you shoot best with. When it comes to guns, try as manufacturers may; one size does not fit all...
357 for some one inexperienced? realy? weildy and to powerfull for most.
My girlfriend got a .357 as her first gun. She does most of her practicing with .38 Special, and then fires at least 12 rounds of the .357 ammo we have for defense.

She is not tiny, but it is not uncontrollable in any way. Even in a 2" S&W she handles it well.
All I here is the part where she uses the 38 special the most. kinda proving my point. I know when I go to do a job I use the tool I am most comfortable with, which is why I prescibe the 38 to start also a revolver leaves no evidence behind is easier to clean, use, and jams way less often. Most guns are used inside of ten foot and the 38 is more than powerfull enough at this distance.. I personally prefer the 45 but I have a great deal of experience.
She uses .38 special because they are cheaper and the lower recoil means it is comfortable at the range. I am willing to bet, if someone is in your house in the middle of the night, you won't feel the recoil. Plus, I doubt you will fire 50 to 75 rounds at an intruder.
the laws of physics do not stop under durress if any thing they are multiplied. An inexperienced shooter in times of stress is more likely to miss the first shot. The more recoil the more time it takes to reaim and shoot again. I can tell you this some one comes in home at night my 45 and my dog is going is make it real tough for them. As far as shooting alot of bullets, kinda supporting my revolver theory. Further more the less expense of the 38 shell makes practice cheaper and practice build confidence and profincey. When the bullets start flying you want what you are most experienced with. If you are going to carry it on the block even more reason for the revolver. There are situations where you might not want to leave cartriges behind. A revolver solves a multitude of problems.
As I said earlier, all of our revolvers are loaded with a .38 Special shotshell in the first chamber. Lower recoil and far less chance of a miss. Then the intruder is shocked and hurting from the pellets, so the next round goes on target.
Unless he's on pcp.
It would be bad to have to shoot somebody trying to come in, but the first round should be able to stop the problem dead in their tracks. For home defense with people untrained, I really favor a 12 gauge.
Not a big fan of a long gun in close quarters.
You can shorten em up a lot but that means you lose the stock which hampers aiming.
Don't think close quarters. You ain't clearing rooms after kicking in a door. Think home defense. If they are close enough for it to be a problem, you already messed up. Not a problem in your own home. You know where the impediments are in the dark already. They don't. Buckshot is just smaller than 22 shorts, except there is a bunch of them. If shooting in the house, it will go through fewer walls than any .38 or higher pistol (safer), and you have a better aim and control, especially by the way it is held. The untrained are often sloppy in the way they hold and sight pistols, and shooting isn't like on TV. If you try it over things and around corners aiming in a general direction with a pistol, you can empty a 15 round magazine down a 4 ft wide hallway and never hit a thing. Steadiest to aim is most likely to solve your home defense problem. A .20 gauge will actually do, and it is light enough and with so little recoil, the most petite wife or significant other can handle it also. Nothing beats the knock down power of buckshot in a shotgun. Check out Paul Harrell on YouTube. comparing weaponry on the "meat target" He has forgotten more than I will ever know. He's the professional. I am just a semi-talented amateur. His video comparisons are excellent.
Nope.
Buck shot is far bigger than a .22 at .330 diameter and it will travel through several interior walls.
And dont tell me what shooting is like.
My Wife had a 12 when I met her,and still does, and can shoot beer cans out of the air from the hip.
will #4 buck shot also travel through walls ??
Here are some informative videos for you to watch regarding your questions on shotguns, and home defense. If you’re really interested in the topic I suggest you peruse the rest of Paul’s video cache, as he posts very educational real world information on the subject.




Yeah...
He has some good info.
I’m sensing a “ya but“..?
No ya buts here.
 

Crixus

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I have never owned a gun as an adult, and im 47 now. Well, thats not true. I have my grandfathers Luger from WW2 that he found on a Nazi on D-Day. He was one of the legendary 101st Airborne paratroopers. Its a super cool gun to have, with a leather case that is very well maintained. Anyway, I also had a rifle when i was a kid and my dad had a very large gun collection that i LOVED! I was always fascinated by guns, i just never bought any as an adult. I have decided that im going to buy one now.

What do i want a gun for? First off, I would like to be able to kill a hostile intruder that enters my home. I dont think that is a very likely scenario, but i want that ability nonetheless. Im 5'9, 170 lbs, so im not looking for a big ass Dirty Harry style gun. I want something lighter, but with enough power to take an intruder down with accuracy. I figure a 9 mm is the best choice for me. Yes a shotgun is probably THE best home protection weapon, but i still want a 9 mm.

The second, and most important reason why i want to buy a gun is because, i want to have fun at gun ranges. Thats it. Im basically buying a gun for fun. Home protection is merely a bonus.

My favorite gun of all time is the HK MP5. Ive been a big fan of HK's forever. I cant buy one of those because they are fully automatic, but there is the HK SP5 version for civilians. Its nearly $3,000 though, and i dont think i can justify that kind of spending, unless i get really hooked on gun shooting, at which point i might expand on my collection.

I have pretty much decided that i want an HK pistol. From my research, the HK VP9 is one of the best 9mm out there. Do you guys have other suggestions? If you can find me a cooler pistol than that, i welcome any suggestions.

For me it's very simple. If it's a semi auto it's a Glock period. If it's a revolver I like the Ruger gp100 in the 7 shot version. The cons of my choice? No e for me, but with Glocks people reallocate like the feel of it's 1,000 percent wrong so be sure to handle and shoot one before you buy. With the revolver, I shoot 125 JHP's out of a 3 inch barrel so it's a fire breathing loud ass dragon, but a game putty cat with 38 special. The Ruger is also bulky so CCW is challenging. Just put some effort I to whatever you pick. And factor the cost of a CCW class into the cost to. Even if you don't plan to carry the training is worth it, and you will get real familiar with the gun you buy.
 

Ringel05

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I have never owned a gun as an adult, and im 47 now. Well, thats not true. I have my grandfathers Luger from WW2 that he found on a Nazi on D-Day. He was one of the legendary 101st Airborne paratroopers. Its a super cool gun to have, with a leather case that is very well maintained. Anyway, I also had a rifle when i was a kid and my dad had a very large gun collection that i LOVED! I was always fascinated by guns, i just never bought any as an adult. I have decided that im going to buy one now.

What do i want a gun for? First off, I would like to be able to kill a hostile intruder that enters my home. I dont think that is a very likely scenario, but i want that ability nonetheless. Im 5'9, 170 lbs, so im not looking for a big ass Dirty Harry style gun. I want something lighter, but with enough power to take an intruder down with accuracy. I figure a 9 mm is the best choice for me. Yes a shotgun is probably THE best home protection weapon, but i still want a 9 mm.

The second, and most important reason why i want to buy a gun is because, i want to have fun at gun ranges. Thats it. Im basically buying a gun for fun. Home protection is merely a bonus.

My favorite gun of all time is the HK MP5. Ive been a big fan of HK's forever. I cant buy one of those because they are fully automatic, but there is the HK SP5 version for civilians. Its nearly $3,000 though, and i dont think i can justify that kind of spending, unless i get really hooked on gun shooting, at which point i might expand on my collection.

I have pretty much decided that i want an HK pistol. From my research, the HK VP9 is one of the best 9mm out there. Do you guys have other suggestions? If you can find me a cooler pistol than that, i welcome any suggestions.

For me it's very simple. If it's a semi auto it's a Glock period. If it's a revolver I like the Ruger gp100 in the 7 shot version. The cons of my choice? No e for me, but with Glocks people reallocate like the feel of it's 1,000 percent wrong so be sure to handle and shoot one before you buy. With the revolver, I shoot 125 JHP's out of a 3 inch barrel so it's a fire breathing loud ass dragon, but a game putty cat with 38 special. The Ruger is also bulky so CCW is challenging. Just put some effort I to whatever you pick. And factor the cost of a CCW class into the cost to. Even if you don't plan to carry the training is worth it, and you will get real familiar with the gun you buy.
I always recommend people handle the firearm they want to buy. Sure, I'll take a Glock but only if you give it to me so I can sell it or trade it for something I like. To me the Glock ergonomics is like trying to hold on to a 2x4 with a pistol attached to it.......
 

petro

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I would recommend a .357 revolver. Yeah, I know lots of people will tell you that they are obsolete. Those people are wrong.

For one thing, it is a simple almost foolproof weapon. In a panic driven emergency, you don't have to think about the gun as much.

Another thing, it allows you to use some different types of ammo. We have 3 revolvers in .357 in various places in our house (2 in nightstands and 1 in the kitchen). All 3 have a .38 Special shot shell loaded in the first position on the cylinder. Then the other 5 rounds are .357 MagSafe hollow points. That gives you a quick, 1st shot and 5 major follow ups.

And lastly, the chances of a jam (using factory loaded ammo) is virtually nil. And revolvers tend to be more accurate.
Best thing about revolvers is they don't leave casings around as added "evidence".:eusa_shhh:
 

Ringel05

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I would recommend a .357 revolver. Yeah, I know lots of people will tell you that they are obsolete. Those people are wrong.

For one thing, it is a simple almost foolproof weapon. In a panic driven emergency, you don't have to think about the gun as much.

Another thing, it allows you to use some different types of ammo. We have 3 revolvers in .357 in various places in our house (2 in nightstands and 1 in the kitchen). All 3 have a .38 Special shot shell loaded in the first position on the cylinder. Then the other 5 rounds are .357 MagSafe hollow points. That gives you a quick, 1st shot and 5 major follow ups.

And lastly, the chances of a jam (using factory loaded ammo) is virtually nil. And revolvers tend to be more accurate.
Best thing about revolvers is they don't leave casings around as added "evidence".:eusa_shhh:
That depends on if you have to reload combat speed loading style. One of our firearms instructors told us a story about muscle memory, bad muscle memory. Back in the 70s lots of cops were getting wounded and killed in fire fights so a study was commissioned to see why. Seems back when cops were using .38s they would practice shooting at the range, when they reloaded they put the empty brass in their pockets...... Guess what, all the wounded and dead cops had empty casings in their pockets, they did exactly as they practiced. In a fire fight, empty casings and empty magazines are of no use, leave em where they drop.
 

WinterBorn

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I would recommend a .357 revolver. Yeah, I know lots of people will tell you that they are obsolete. Those people are wrong.

For one thing, it is a simple almost foolproof weapon. In a panic driven emergency, you don't have to think about the gun as much.

Another thing, it allows you to use some different types of ammo. We have 3 revolvers in .357 in various places in our house (2 in nightstands and 1 in the kitchen). All 3 have a .38 Special shot shell loaded in the first position on the cylinder. Then the other 5 rounds are .357 MagSafe hollow points. That gives you a quick, 1st shot and 5 major follow ups.

And lastly, the chances of a jam (using factory loaded ammo) is virtually nil. And revolvers tend to be more accurate.
Best thing about revolvers is they don't leave casings around as added "evidence".:eusa_shhh:
That depends on if you have to reload combat speed loading style. One of our firearms instructors told us a story about muscle memory, bad muscle memory. Back in the 70s lots of cops were getting wounded and killed in fire fights so a study was commissioned to see why. Seems back when cops were using .38s they would practice shooting at the range, when they reloaded they put the empty brass in their pockets...... Guess what, all the wounded and dead cops had empty casings in their pockets, they did exactly as they practiced. In a fire fight, empty casings and empty magazines are of no use, leave em where they drop.
Shooting for accuracy at the range is all well and good. It is a big part of the fun.

But with your defensive weapon, train like you are defending your life.
 

Crixus

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I have never owned a gun as an adult, and im 47 now. Well, thats not true. I have my grandfathers Luger from WW2 that he found on a Nazi on D-Day. He was one of the legendary 101st Airborne paratroopers. Its a super cool gun to have, with a leather case that is very well maintained. Anyway, I also had a rifle when i was a kid and my dad had a very large gun collection that i LOVED! I was always fascinated by guns, i just never bought any as an adult. I have decided that im going to buy one now.

What do i want a gun for? First off, I would like to be able to kill a hostile intruder that enters my home. I dont think that is a very likely scenario, but i want that ability nonetheless. Im 5'9, 170 lbs, so im not looking for a big ass Dirty Harry style gun. I want something lighter, but with enough power to take an intruder down with accuracy. I figure a 9 mm is the best choice for me. Yes a shotgun is probably THE best home protection weapon, but i still want a 9 mm.

The second, and most important reason why i want to buy a gun is because, i want to have fun at gun ranges. Thats it. Im basically buying a gun for fun. Home protection is merely a bonus.

My favorite gun of all time is the HK MP5. Ive been a big fan of HK's forever. I cant buy one of those because they are fully automatic, but there is the HK SP5 version for civilians. Its nearly $3,000 though, and i dont think i can justify that kind of spending, unless i get really hooked on gun shooting, at which point i might expand on my collection.

I have pretty much decided that i want an HK pistol. From my research, the HK VP9 is one of the best 9mm out there. Do you guys have other suggestions? If you can find me a cooler pistol than that, i welcome any suggestions.

For me it's very simple. If it's a semi auto it's a Glock period. If it's a revolver I like the Ruger gp100 in the 7 shot version. The cons of my choice? No e for me, but with Glocks people reallocate like the feel of it's 1,000 percent wrong so be sure to handle and shoot one before you buy. With the revolver, I shoot 125 JHP's out of a 3 inch barrel so it's a fire breathing loud ass dragon, but a game putty cat with 38 special. The Ruger is also bulky so CCW is challenging. Just put some effort I to whatever you pick. And factor the cost of a CCW class into the cost to. Even if you don't plan to carry the training is worth it, and you will get real familiar with the gun you buy.
I always recommend people handle the firearm they want to buy. Sure, I'll take a Glock but only if you give it to me so I can sell it or trade it for something I like. To me the Glock ergonomics is like trying to hold on to a 2x4 with a pistol attached to it.......

That's why I say get as many guns I. Your hand before you buy as you can. That's also why I recommend a CCW course. For them that can use them, which is just about everyone ln then world as demonstrated but the fact that almost every police department and military in the world uses a Glock. It's cheaper then most choices out there and dead easy to learn. But as you say, with the Glock you can live with it, or you would rather be consumed by zombies rather then touch a Glock.
 

Crixus

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I would recommend a .357 revolver. Yeah, I know lots of people will tell you that they are obsolete. Those people are wrong.

For one thing, it is a simple almost foolproof weapon. In a panic driven emergency, you don't have to think about the gun as much.

Another thing, it allows you to use some different types of ammo. We have 3 revolvers in .357 in various places in our house (2 in nightstands and 1 in the kitchen). All 3 have a .38 Special shot shell loaded in the first position on the cylinder. Then the other 5 rounds are .357 MagSafe hollow points. That gives you a quick, 1st shot and 5 major follow ups.

And lastly, the chances of a jam (using factory loaded ammo) is virtually nil. And revolvers tend to be more accurate.
Best thing about revolvers is they don't leave casings around as added "evidence".:eusa_shhh:
That depends on if you have to reload combat speed loading style. One of our firearms instructors told us a story about muscle memory, bad muscle memory. Back in the 70s lots of cops were getting wounded and killed in fire fights so a study was commissioned to see why. Seems back when cops were using .38s they would practice shooting at the range, when they reloaded they put the empty brass in their pockets...... Guess what, all the wounded and dead cops had empty casings in their pockets, they did exactly as they practiced. In a fire fight, empty casings and empty magazines are of no use, leave em where they drop.

You were reading Masaad Ayoob huh? If so that was a 50's 60's and on into 80's thing.
 
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