Black Communities Ravaged by COVID-19. Black Churches Still Meeting.

SweetSue92

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And yet, AMAZINGLY, White Leftist Shamers on USMB are silent about it and we don't see any Black Pastors being arrested on television. We have fat crocodile tears about the "mega churches". (Black churches are never "mega churches" for some reason.)

I wonder why that is, any ideas?

When deciding to close the doors of black churches, congregational leaders across the US wrestle with unique considerations. Paul J. James, pastor of CareView Community Church in Lansdowne, Pennsylvania, noted in an interview with The Undefeated how closing is “counterintuitive to most churches, especially the black church… where we’re just glad to get together because of how hard life has been historically for us here in America. Church has been a safe place for us. It’s been a safe harbor. Now here we are faced with the inability to come together.”

Last week, the federal government strongly urged Americans not to gather in groups of more than 10, and restrictions keep coming. We suspect that many churches will close in the near future, but the decision will not been easy.

In St. Louis, the mayor hosted a teleconference with 300 clergy, including many of black churches, to urge them not to hold services. While some chose to stop meetings and modify their ministries, others struggled to make the change.

In Michigan, Gov. Gretchen Whitmer banned gatherings of more than 50 but then exempted churches from penalties. This will give some churches more options, though many are choosing to modify in some way. Triumph Church, which has seven locations in the Detroit area, will continue to gather in person, for now, though it expanded the number of services to reduce congregation size and is asking members to register ahead of time so it can maintain at least six feet between worshippers. It is also providing an online service and a drive-in service.

A lot of things inform these responses to the coronavirus outbreak: culture, histories of discrimination, and marginalization, as well as faith-based values. People experience events like COVID-19 not only as individuals but also in communities and in the social locations we inhabit. As social scientists—Deidra as a black woman doing research on HPV and Elaine as a white woman who studies how religious organizations respond to science—we offer some observations based on our research for the past 10 years at the Religion and Public Life Program at Rice University. We have been gathering upwards of 150 religious and civic leaders regularly to talk about how we can use social science research on religion to build common ground for the common good.

 
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SweetSue92

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Has there been more than 1 pastor arrested on television?
Not a single Black pastor has been arrested on television even though, as you see, Black churches are still meeting.

Now gosh ain't that a kick in the head? Later on, the Black community will say oh no oh no the disease is racist, the care we got is racist.
 
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SweetSue92

SweetSue92

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And yet, AMAZINGLY, White Leftist Shamers on USMB are silent about it and we don't see any Black Pastors being arrested on television. We have fat crocodile tears about the "mega churches". (Black churches are never "mega churches" for some reason.)

I wonder why that is, any ideas?

When deciding to close the doors of black churches, congregational leaders across the US wrestle with unique considerations. Paul J. James, pastor of CareView Community Church in Lansdowne, Pennsylvania, noted in an interview with The Undefeated how closing is “counterintuitive to most churches, especially the black church… where we’re just glad to get together because of how hard life has been historically for us here in America. Church has been a safe place for us. It’s been a safe harbor. Now here we are faced with the inability to come together.”

Last week, the federal government strongly urged Americans not to gather in groups of more than 10, and restrictions keep coming. We suspect that many churches will close in the near future, but the decision will not been easy.

In St. Louis, the mayor hosted a teleconference with 300 clergy, including many of black churches, to urge them not to hold services. While some chose to stop meetings and modify their ministries, others struggled to make the change.

In Michigan, Gov. Gretchen Whitmer banned gatherings of more than 50 but then exempted churches from penalties. This will give some churches more options, though many are choosing to modify in some way. Triumph Church, which has seven locations in the Detroit area, will continue to gather in person, for now, though it expanded the number of services to reduce congregation size and is asking members to register ahead of time so it can maintain at least six feet between worshippers. It is also providing an online service and a drive-in service.

A lot of things inform these responses to the coronavirus outbreak: culture, histories of discrimination, and marginalization, as well as faith-based values. People experience events like COVID-19 not only as individuals but also in communities and in the social locations we inhabit. As social scientists—Deidra as a black woman doing research on HPV and Elaine as a white woman who studies how religious organizations respond to science—we offer some observations based on our research for the past 10 years at the Religion and Public Life Program at Rice University. We have been gathering upwards of 150 religious and civic leaders regularly to talk about how we can use social science research on religion to build common ground for the common good.

How the Black communities in Michigan are begin affected and not just in Detroit either. And yet again, still meeting in churches in Detroit in the article mentioned above. I checked, this is current as of today:

 

IM2

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And yet, AMAZINGLY, White Leftist Shamers on USMB are silent about it and we don't see any Black Pastors being arrested on television. We have fat crocodile tears about the "mega churches". (Black churches are never "mega churches" for some reason.)

I wonder why that is, any ideas?

When deciding to close the doors of black churches, congregational leaders across the US wrestle with unique considerations. Paul J. James, pastor of CareView Community Church in Lansdowne, Pennsylvania, noted in an interview with The Undefeated how closing is “counterintuitive to most churches, especially the black church… where we’re just glad to get together because of how hard life has been historically for us here in America. Church has been a safe place for us. It’s been a safe harbor. Now here we are faced with the inability to come together.”

Last week, the federal government strongly urged Americans not to gather in groups of more than 10, and restrictions keep coming. We suspect that many churches will close in the near future, but the decision will not been easy.

In St. Louis, the mayor hosted a teleconference with 300 clergy, including many of black churches, to urge them not to hold services. While some chose to stop meetings and modify their ministries, others struggled to make the change.

In Michigan, Gov. Gretchen Whitmer banned gatherings of more than 50 but then exempted churches from penalties. This will give some churches more options, though many are choosing to modify in some way. Triumph Church, which has seven locations in the Detroit area, will continue to gather in person, for now, though it expanded the number of services to reduce congregation size and is asking members to register ahead of time so it can maintain at least six feet between worshippers. It is also providing an online service and a drive-in service.

A lot of things inform these responses to the coronavirus outbreak: culture, histories of discrimination, and marginalization, as well as faith-based values. People experience events like COVID-19 not only as individuals but also in communities and in the social locations we inhabit. As social scientists—Deidra as a black woman doing research on HPV and Elaine as a white woman who studies how religious organizations respond to science—we offer some observations based on our research for the past 10 years at the Religion and Public Life Program at Rice University. We have been gathering upwards of 150 religious and civic leaders regularly to talk about how we can use social science research on religion to build common ground for the common good.

Drop the white victimhood lady. There are black mega churches. And apparently blacks in Florida aren't holding services in churches. And its always funny when a republican like you suddenly gets so concerned about blacks only after somebody white gets arrested for something that you can't see blacks getting arrested for.

Nobody black will be calling COVID19 a racist disease. But that's how you racists see black people. Normal non racist whites would not make that kind of comment.

Black churches need to close just like everybody else. But what you really need to do Sue is work on ending the racism in the white community that has you posting this instead of whining "what about black pastors, why don't they get arrested."
 

IM2

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Who didn’t see this coming (besides white democrats)?
I already predicted that any disproportionate number of black deaths from Wuhan would be used as a Katrina replay against trump.
trump didn't see this coming. We don't need this virus for any type of replay against trump. We have the 3 years before the virus hit, that's plenty of evidence.
 

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Has there been more than 1 pastor arrested on television?
Not a single Black pastor has been arrested on television even though, as you see, Black churches are still meeting.

Now gosh ain't that a kick in the head? Later on, the Black community will say oh no oh no the disease is racist, the care we got is racist.
If only 1 pastor has been arrested on television, what does it matter if not a single black pastor has been arrested on television?
 
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SweetSue92

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And yet, AMAZINGLY, White Leftist Shamers on USMB are silent about it and we don't see any Black Pastors being arrested on television. We have fat crocodile tears about the "mega churches". (Black churches are never "mega churches" for some reason.)

I wonder why that is, any ideas?

When deciding to close the doors of black churches, congregational leaders across the US wrestle with unique considerations. Paul J. James, pastor of CareView Community Church in Lansdowne, Pennsylvania, noted in an interview with The Undefeated how closing is “counterintuitive to most churches, especially the black church… where we’re just glad to get together because of how hard life has been historically for us here in America. Church has been a safe place for us. It’s been a safe harbor. Now here we are faced with the inability to come together.”

Last week, the federal government strongly urged Americans not to gather in groups of more than 10, and restrictions keep coming. We suspect that many churches will close in the near future, but the decision will not been easy.

In St. Louis, the mayor hosted a teleconference with 300 clergy, including many of black churches, to urge them not to hold services. While some chose to stop meetings and modify their ministries, others struggled to make the change.

In Michigan, Gov. Gretchen Whitmer banned gatherings of more than 50 but then exempted churches from penalties. This will give some churches more options, though many are choosing to modify in some way. Triumph Church, which has seven locations in the Detroit area, will continue to gather in person, for now, though it expanded the number of services to reduce congregation size and is asking members to register ahead of time so it can maintain at least six feet between worshippers. It is also providing an online service and a drive-in service.

A lot of things inform these responses to the coronavirus outbreak: culture, histories of discrimination, and marginalization, as well as faith-based values. People experience events like COVID-19 not only as individuals but also in communities and in the social locations we inhabit. As social scientists—Deidra as a black woman doing research on HPV and Elaine as a white woman who studies how religious organizations respond to science—we offer some observations based on our research for the past 10 years at the Religion and Public Life Program at Rice University. We have been gathering upwards of 150 religious and civic leaders regularly to talk about how we can use social science research on religion to build common ground for the common good.

Drop the white victimhood lady. There are black mega churches. And apparently blacks in Florida aren't holding services in churches. And its always funny when a republican like you suddenly gets so concerned about blacks only after somebody white gets arrested for something that you can't see blacks getting arrested for.

Nobody black will be calling COVID19 a racist disease. But that's how you racists see black people. Normal non racist whites would not make that kind of comment.

Black churches need to close just like everybody else. But what you really need to do Sue is work on ending the racism in the white community that has you posting this instead of whining "what about black pastors, why don't they get arrested."

They are already starting in on the racism absolutely. Of course it's racism and not the fact that Blacks in Detroit are still congregating in family groups; still going to church in groups.

Although Detroit has the highest concentration of cases, several suburbs that surround the city have low rates of coronavirus including Dearborn, Allen Park and Grosse Pointe Park.

All are predominantly white.

Tlaib said “it is very clear that structural racism is showing its ugly face during this global pandemic.”

“It is communities of color, especially the African-American community in my district, that you see getting directly impacted,” she said.

Dr. Abdul El-Sayed, an epidemiologist, said even if it was made public, existing data on coronavirus may not illustrate the full effect in communities of color.

“We're testing only people who come in with severe disease,” said El-Sayed, the former health director of the City of Detroit who ran for governor in 2018 as a Democrat.

“Frankly, I think that we would be very much underestimating the burden that this disease has in low-income communities and communities of color.”
 
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SweetSue92

SweetSue92

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Has there been more than 1 pastor arrested on television?
Not a single Black pastor has been arrested on television even though, as you see, Black churches are still meeting.

Now gosh ain't that a kick in the head? Later on, the Black community will say oh no oh no the disease is racist, the care we got is racist.
If only 1 pastor has been arrested on television, what does it matter if not a single black pastor has been arrested on television?
At least two now. Why must I do everyone's research for them?

 

IM2

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And yet, AMAZINGLY, White Leftist Shamers on USMB are silent about it and we don't see any Black Pastors being arrested on television. We have fat crocodile tears about the "mega churches". (Black churches are never "mega churches" for some reason.)

I wonder why that is, any ideas?

When deciding to close the doors of black churches, congregational leaders across the US wrestle with unique considerations. Paul J. James, pastor of CareView Community Church in Lansdowne, Pennsylvania, noted in an interview with The Undefeated how closing is “counterintuitive to most churches, especially the black church… where we’re just glad to get together because of how hard life has been historically for us here in America. Church has been a safe place for us. It’s been a safe harbor. Now here we are faced with the inability to come together.”

Last week, the federal government strongly urged Americans not to gather in groups of more than 10, and restrictions keep coming. We suspect that many churches will close in the near future, but the decision will not been easy.

In St. Louis, the mayor hosted a teleconference with 300 clergy, including many of black churches, to urge them not to hold services. While some chose to stop meetings and modify their ministries, others struggled to make the change.

In Michigan, Gov. Gretchen Whitmer banned gatherings of more than 50 but then exempted churches from penalties. This will give some churches more options, though many are choosing to modify in some way. Triumph Church, which has seven locations in the Detroit area, will continue to gather in person, for now, though it expanded the number of services to reduce congregation size and is asking members to register ahead of time so it can maintain at least six feet between worshippers. It is also providing an online service and a drive-in service.

A lot of things inform these responses to the coronavirus outbreak: culture, histories of discrimination, and marginalization, as well as faith-based values. People experience events like COVID-19 not only as individuals but also in communities and in the social locations we inhabit. As social scientists—Deidra as a black woman doing research on HPV and Elaine as a white woman who studies how religious organizations respond to science—we offer some observations based on our research for the past 10 years at the Religion and Public Life Program at Rice University. We have been gathering upwards of 150 religious and civic leaders regularly to talk about how we can use social science research on religion to build common ground for the common good.

Drop the white victimhood lady. There are black mega churches. And apparently blacks in Florida aren't holding services in churches. And its always funny when a republican like you suddenly gets so concerned about blacks only after somebody white gets arrested for something that you can't see blacks getting arrested for.

Nobody black will be calling COVID19 a racist disease. But that's how you racists see black people. Normal non racist whites would not make that kind of comment.

Black churches need to close just like everybody else. But what you really need to do Sue is work on ending the racism in the white community that has you posting this instead of whining "what about black pastors, why don't they get arrested."

They are already starting in on the racism absolutely. Of course it's racism and not the fact that Blacks in Detroit are still congregating in family groups; still going to church in groups.

Although Detroit has the highest concentration of cases, several suburbs that surround the city have low rates of coronavirus including Dearborn, Allen Park and Grosse Pointe Park.

All are predominantly white.

Tlaib said “it is very clear that structural racism is showing its ugly face during this global pandemic.”

“It is communities of color, especially the African-American community in my district, that you see getting directly impacted,” she said.

Dr. Abdul El-Sayed, an epidemiologist, said even if it was made public, existing data on coronavirus may not illustrate the full effect in communities of color.

“We're testing only people who come in with severe disease,” said El-Sayed, the former health director of the City of Detroit who ran for governor in 2018 as a Democrat.

“Frankly, I think that we would be very much underestimating the burden that this disease has in low-income communities and communities of color.”
I'm black sue, please stop trying to tell me what blacks are thinking. Funny how you are on this but you run from the reality of white racist American public policy. COVID19 will hit the black community hard due to the scarcity of medical facilities in that community, low incomes and the inability to afford health insurance. And that is due to racism. So like I said, you don't want to discuss white racist American public policy, but you want to run your mouth about some black churches in Detroit.
 
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SweetSue92

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And yet, AMAZINGLY, White Leftist Shamers on USMB are silent about it and we don't see any Black Pastors being arrested on television. We have fat crocodile tears about the "mega churches". (Black churches are never "mega churches" for some reason.)

I wonder why that is, any ideas?

When deciding to close the doors of black churches, congregational leaders across the US wrestle with unique considerations. Paul J. James, pastor of CareView Community Church in Lansdowne, Pennsylvania, noted in an interview with The Undefeated how closing is “counterintuitive to most churches, especially the black church… where we’re just glad to get together because of how hard life has been historically for us here in America. Church has been a safe place for us. It’s been a safe harbor. Now here we are faced with the inability to come together.”

Last week, the federal government strongly urged Americans not to gather in groups of more than 10, and restrictions keep coming. We suspect that many churches will close in the near future, but the decision will not been easy.

In St. Louis, the mayor hosted a teleconference with 300 clergy, including many of black churches, to urge them not to hold services. While some chose to stop meetings and modify their ministries, others struggled to make the change.

In Michigan, Gov. Gretchen Whitmer banned gatherings of more than 50 but then exempted churches from penalties. This will give some churches more options, though many are choosing to modify in some way. Triumph Church, which has seven locations in the Detroit area, will continue to gather in person, for now, though it expanded the number of services to reduce congregation size and is asking members to register ahead of time so it can maintain at least six feet between worshippers. It is also providing an online service and a drive-in service.

A lot of things inform these responses to the coronavirus outbreak: culture, histories of discrimination, and marginalization, as well as faith-based values. People experience events like COVID-19 not only as individuals but also in communities and in the social locations we inhabit. As social scientists—Deidra as a black woman doing research on HPV and Elaine as a white woman who studies how religious organizations respond to science—we offer some observations based on our research for the past 10 years at the Religion and Public Life Program at Rice University. We have been gathering upwards of 150 religious and civic leaders regularly to talk about how we can use social science research on religion to build common ground for the common good.

Drop the white victimhood lady. There are black mega churches. And apparently blacks in Florida aren't holding services in churches. And its always funny when a republican like you suddenly gets so concerned about blacks only after somebody white gets arrested for something that you can't see blacks getting arrested for.

Nobody black will be calling COVID19 a racist disease. But that's how you racists see black people. Normal non racist whites would not make that kind of comment.

Black churches need to close just like everybody else. But what you really need to do Sue is work on ending the racism in the white community that has you posting this instead of whining "what about black pastors, why don't they get arrested."

They are already starting in on the racism absolutely. Of course it's racism and not the fact that Blacks in Detroit are still congregating in family groups; still going to church in groups.

Although Detroit has the highest concentration of cases, several suburbs that surround the city have low rates of coronavirus including Dearborn, Allen Park and Grosse Pointe Park.

All are predominantly white.

Tlaib said “it is very clear that structural racism is showing its ugly face during this global pandemic.”

“It is communities of color, especially the African-American community in my district, that you see getting directly impacted,” she said.

Dr. Abdul El-Sayed, an epidemiologist, said even if it was made public, existing data on coronavirus may not illustrate the full effect in communities of color.

“We're testing only people who come in with severe disease,” said El-Sayed, the former health director of the City of Detroit who ran for governor in 2018 as a Democrat.

“Frankly, I think that we would be very much underestimating the burden that this disease has in low-income communities and communities of color.”
I'm black sue, please stop trying to tell me what blacks are thinking. Funny how you are on this but you run from the reality of white racist American public policy. COVID19 will hit the black community hard due to the scarcity of medical facilities in that community, low incomes and the inability to afford health insurance. And that is due to racism. So like I said, you don't want to discuss white racist American public policy, but you want to run your mouth about some black churches in Detroit.
This is the last post in which I will address you. I agree that all of those are severe and lamentable issues and they will impact the community and COVID in Detroit and elsewhere. Due to poverty, lack of healthcare and the preponderance of health conditions in the black community such as COPD, high blood pressure, obesity and diabetes, it's going to be anywhere from difficult to devastating.

IT DOES NOT HELP when black people make the choice not to socially distance themselves in churches or in family gatherings.

That's it from me, I notice you are picking at me but ignore the actual racist comment in the thread. That's because I'm not actually a racist, which you know. So, I'm done.
 
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RoshawnMarkwees

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Who didn’t see this coming (besides white democrats)?
I already predicted that any disproportionate number of black deaths from Wuhan would be used as a Katrina replay against trump.
trump didn't see this coming. We don't need this virus for any type of replay against trump. We have the 3 years before the virus hit, that's plenty of evidence.
What I was talking about coming wasn’t the virus. It was the charges of racism post-disaster by neo-segregationists like you.
 

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And yet, AMAZINGLY, White Leftist Shamers on USMB are silent about it and we don't see any Black Pastors being arrested on television. We have fat crocodile tears about the "mega churches". (Black churches are never "mega churches" for some reason.)

I wonder why that is, any ideas?

When deciding to close the doors of black churches, congregational leaders across the US wrestle with unique considerations. Paul J. James, pastor of CareView Community Church in Lansdowne, Pennsylvania, noted in an interview with The Undefeated how closing is “counterintuitive to most churches, especially the black church… where we’re just glad to get together because of how hard life has been historically for us here in America. Church has been a safe place for us. It’s been a safe harbor. Now here we are faced with the inability to come together.”

Last week, the federal government strongly urged Americans not to gather in groups of more than 10, and restrictions keep coming. We suspect that many churches will close in the near future, but the decision will not been easy.

In St. Louis, the mayor hosted a teleconference with 300 clergy, including many of black churches, to urge them not to hold services. While some chose to stop meetings and modify their ministries, others struggled to make the change.

In Michigan, Gov. Gretchen Whitmer banned gatherings of more than 50 but then exempted churches from penalties. This will give some churches more options, though many are choosing to modify in some way. Triumph Church, which has seven locations in the Detroit area, will continue to gather in person, for now, though it expanded the number of services to reduce congregation size and is asking members to register ahead of time so it can maintain at least six feet between worshippers. It is also providing an online service and a drive-in service.

A lot of things inform these responses to the coronavirus outbreak: culture, histories of discrimination, and marginalization, as well as faith-based values. People experience events like COVID-19 not only as individuals but also in communities and in the social locations we inhabit. As social scientists—Deidra as a black woman doing research on HPV and Elaine as a white woman who studies how religious organizations respond to science—we offer some observations based on our research for the past 10 years at the Religion and Public Life Program at Rice University. We have been gathering upwards of 150 religious and civic leaders regularly to talk about how we can use social science research on religion to build common ground for the common good.

Drop the white victimhood lady. There are black mega churches. And apparently blacks in Florida aren't holding services in churches. And its always funny when a republican like you suddenly gets so concerned about blacks only after somebody white gets arrested for something that you can't see blacks getting arrested for.

Nobody black will be calling COVID19 a racist disease. But that's how you racists see black people. Normal non racist whites would not make that kind of comment.

Black churches need to close just like everybody else. But what you really need to do Sue is work on ending the racism in the white community that has you posting this instead of whining "what about black pastors, why don't they get arrested."
Why must there still be ‘black’ churches and why does everyone have to accept that without question?
 

Montrovant

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Has there been more than 1 pastor arrested on television?
Not a single Black pastor has been arrested on television even though, as you see, Black churches are still meeting.

Now gosh ain't that a kick in the head? Later on, the Black community will say oh no oh no the disease is racist, the care we got is racist.
If only 1 pastor has been arrested on television, what does it matter if not a single black pastor has been arrested on television?
At least two now. Why must I do everyone's research for them?

Was he also arrested on television?

Also, now you've shown 2 arrested pastors. Why did 1 of them need to be black? The article you just linked to said that pastor had 1000 people at the church, which violated an order. I noticed in your link regarding black churches that it didn't say anything about a similar circumstance. If none of the black churches had gatherings that large, or if they didn't violate any state or local orders, that would make arresting a black pastor on television a much less likely occurrence, wouldn't it?

My point is that you're complaining about one thing not following along with another thing, without showing that the two things are actually the same. Additionally, you've given 2 examples and for some reason made it seem as if they are automatically indicative of a larger trend. Beyond that, this is the first I've heard about the subject of black churches still having services during the pandemic. I don't frequent christianitytoday.com. If the "White Leftist Shamers" you are complaining about also haven't heard or read such stories, that would make it hard for them to comment on or shame anyone over for it.

I think people congregating for church (or temple, or mosque, etc.) with a pandemic going on, when social distancing is the watchword of the times, is foolish. That's especially true in a world where phone calls, text, and video chat are so easy to do. I don't care about the race or ethnicity of the people who go to their place of worship; black, Hispanic, white, Asian, Native Indian, now's not the time for a bunch of people in close quarters.
 

JoeB131

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And yet, AMAZINGLY, White Leftist Shamers on USMB are silent about it and we don't see any Black Pastors being arrested on television. We have fat crocodile tears about the "mega churches". (Black churches are never "mega churches" for some reason.)
Um, yeah, that's because they are poor and usually can't afford big buildings and congregations in the thousands.
If they are still doing it, though, shame on them.
 
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SweetSue92

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o please we know the most segregated hours is the 11 to 12 on sunday...very few churches are mixed
there are huge black mega churches....and yes sue is trump bigot
What does this mean, "sue is trump bigot"

I'm a bigot, does that mean? Oh dear I've never heard that before, I'm gonna go cry for an hour bones you cut me to the quick lol
 

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