Anyone can be a Navy SEAL.

Camp

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Every Navy SEAL I've known has had an above-average high IQ.
 

ABikerSailor

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Just getting to SEAL training requires a LOT of effort, and no, not everyone can become one. Out of all the applications that are submitted for each year, only around 10 percent of them actually get selected. In order to just qualify to go to training, you must be screened by the command, checked out physically, and must pass a physical fitness test that is about twice as hard as what the rest of the Navy has to do. After you meet all those gates, you have to be screened by a SEAL to see if they want you in their group. And that's just to get to training.

Out of the 100 or so that might be in a class, only about 30 to 40 of them will actually complete the training. Others will wash out because of various reasons, some might not be mentally fit, others might not be physically fit, and still a few others might get hurt in training bad enough to not be able to complete the course.

No. Not anyone can be a SEAL. And, like Camp said about SEALs having a bit more smarts than most, that is true, because they also have to qualify with their ASVAB scores.
 

Likkmee

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Just getting to SEAL training requires a LOT of effort, and no, not everyone can become one. Out of all the applications that are submitted for each year, only around 10 percent of them actually get selected. In order to just qualify to go to training, you must be screened by the command, checked out physically, and must pass a physical fitness test that is about twice as hard as what the rest of the Navy has to do. After you meet all those gates, you have to be screened by a SEAL to see if they want you in their group. And that's just to get to training.

Out of the 100 or so that might be in a class, only about 30 to 40 of them will actually complete the training. Others will wash out because of various reasons, some might not be mentally fit, others might not be physically fit, and still a few others might get hurt in training bad enough to not be able to complete the course.

No. Not anyone can be a SEAL. And, like Camp said about SEALs having a bit more smarts than most, that is true, because they also have to qualify with their ASVAB scores.
that B diskrimatedun !
 

Moonglow

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I hung around some SEALS and wondered if they knew they were bad MF's...
 

ABikerSailor

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I hung around some SEALS and wondered if they knew they were bad MF's...
That is one of the more interesting things about SEALs. Yes, they know EXACTLY how dangerous they are, yet they are also some of the most polite and decent acting people I've ever met. They are fairly tame when they are around others, but can get a bit rowdy when they are in the company of their own.

Some of them also have pretty twisted senses of humor. When I was at LMET training for 1st Class, we had a SEAL in our class, and he told us about one time when he was going through parachute jumping quals. Seems that a couple of them thought it would be funny to fill a flight suit with watermelons, and have it jump with them. They turned it loose just as they were opening their chutes, and it fell pretty close to the target and exploded when it hit. The 2 SEALS who were doing the jump landed, then whipped out forks and went to the flight suit and started chowing down. He said the grader damn near lost their lunch when he saw them do that.
 

ABikerSailor

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Most people can't even get into the regular service, Army, Navy, etc., let alone into the special operations community.

Yep. Out of all the people in this country who are 18 to 35 (age eligible to join), only 30 percent of them are qualified to enlist. Out of that 30 percent, only about 1 percent actually do decide to enlist.

Of people that enlist and join the military, only about 10 percent are even qualified to apply for special warfare programs, and out of that 10 percent who are qualified and selected to go to training, only about 30 percent who make it to training complete it.

No, not just anyone can become a special warfare operator.
 

freyasman

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Most people can't even get into the regular service, Army, Navy, etc., let alone into the special operations community.

Yep. Out of all the people in this country who are 18 to 35 (age eligible to join), only 30 percent of them are qualified to enlist. Out of that 30 percent, only about 1 percent actually do decide to enlist.

Of people that enlist and join the military, only about 10 percent are even qualified to apply for special warfare programs, and out of that 10 percent who are qualified and selected to go to training, only about 30 percent who make it to training complete it.

No, not just anyone can become a special warfare operator.
I turned 36 when I was going through SFAS..... I had never been able to go before, I was always either deployed, in a school, or got injured before my class date. They told me I had scored too low on the math portions of the tests, and to go take some classes and come back in 6 months. I deployed to Afghanistan instead and ended up in a beef with the chain of command that nuked my career. Never did go back to selection.
 

ABikerSailor

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Most people can't even get into the regular service, Army, Navy, etc., let alone into the special operations community.

Yep. Out of all the people in this country who are 18 to 35 (age eligible to join), only 30 percent of them are qualified to enlist. Out of that 30 percent, only about 1 percent actually do decide to enlist.

Of people that enlist and join the military, only about 10 percent are even qualified to apply for special warfare programs, and out of that 10 percent who are qualified and selected to go to training, only about 30 percent who make it to training complete it.

No, not just anyone can become a special warfare operator.
I turned 36 when I was going through SFAS..... I had never been able to go before, I was always either deployed, in a school, or got injured before my class date. They told me I had scored too low on the math portions of the tests, and to go take some classes and come back in 6 months. I deployed to Afghanistan instead and ended up in a beef with the chain of command that nuked my career. Never did go back to selection.
Yep, that is another part of the screening process, they check to see if you have gone to NJP, because if you have, the last thing they want is to have someone who could become a disciplinary problem.

Sorry about your beef. Yep, I had a couple incidents over my career where I got into disagreements with the chain. Won all of them except for the first one when I got into a beef with a LT on my first command.
 

freyasman

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Most people can't even get into the regular service, Army, Navy, etc., let alone into the special operations community.

Yep. Out of all the people in this country who are 18 to 35 (age eligible to join), only 30 percent of them are qualified to enlist. Out of that 30 percent, only about 1 percent actually do decide to enlist.

Of people that enlist and join the military, only about 10 percent are even qualified to apply for special warfare programs, and out of that 10 percent who are qualified and selected to go to training, only about 30 percent who make it to training complete it.

No, not just anyone can become a special warfare operator.
I turned 36 when I was going through SFAS..... I had never been able to go before, I was always either deployed, in a school, or got injured before my class date. They told me I had scored too low on the math portions of the tests, and to go take some classes and come back in 6 months. I deployed to Afghanistan instead and ended up in a beef with the chain of command that nuked my career. Never did go back to selection.
Yep, that is another part of the screening process, they check to see if you have gone to NJP, because if you have, the last thing they want is to have someone who could become a disciplinary problem.

Sorry about your beef. Yep, I had a couple incidents over my career where I got into disagreements with the chain. Won all of them except for the first one when I got into a beef with a LT on my first command.
The biggest problem with mine was that it destroyed any trust or faith in the institution I had, and everything in the military is about trust. I don't blame most of my subsequent units for not wanting a guy who refused to let anyone get behind him, and who wouldn't believe any of them or anything they said until it was independently verified. You can't run a platoon like that...... it doesn't work and it's a disruption. Plus, young joes and even junior NCOs start asking questions about whether the Army might decide to fuck them over some day, the way they did me.

I was radioactive for the last few years I was in.
 

whitehall

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Marcus Lutrell said it best in his best seller "Lone Survivor" (ironically about a failed Seal mission) "I wondered what Seals were doing on patrol at 10,000 feet". Good question. Seals aren't trained infantry, they are trained mostly to withstand hypothermia to accomplish difficult missions in a water environment. The ideal Seal mission was the taking down of the pirates that hijacked Capt. Phillips ship and they did it well. There is no shortage of snipers in the Army and the Marines, in fact they have virtually the same training, so what was a Sailor doing on a rooftop picking off hostiles in a town in Afghanistan? Maybe with the blessing of a lazy president who didn't trust the Military, the mission was taken away from the Military leadership and given to the CIA.
 

ABikerSailor

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Marcus Lutrell said it best in his best seller "Lone Survivor" (ironically about a failed Seal mission) "I wondered what Seals were doing on patrol at 10,000 feet". Good question. Seals aren't trained infantry, they are trained mostly to withstand hypothermia to accomplish difficult missions in a water environment. The ideal Seal mission was the taking down of the pirates that hijacked Capt. Phillips ship and they did it well. There is no shortage of snipers in the Army and the Marines, in fact they have virtually the same training, so what was a Sailor doing on a rooftop picking off hostiles in a town in Afghanistan? Maybe with the blessing of a lazy president who didn't trust the Military, the mission was taken away from the Military leadership and given to the CIA.
They are trained PRIMARILY for water, but they also include air and land. That is what SEAL stands for, SEa, Air, Land.
 

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