Vote To Condemn Prison Abuse

Discussion in 'Politics' started by no1tovote4, May 7, 2004.

  1. no1tovote4
    Offline

    no1tovote4 VIP Member

    Joined:
    Apr 13, 2004
    Messages:
    10,294
    Thanks Received:
    616
    Trophy Points:
    83
    Location:
    Colorado
    Ratings:
    +616
    Yesterday the Congress voted on a resolution to condemn the abuse of prisoners in Iraq, but to support the honorable troops.

    All votes yes except 49 Democrats and 1 Independent.

    The Independent is Ron Paul of Texas who has a reputation for only voting yes on Bills that are fully Constitutional. Sounds Libertarian to me. He is aligned with the Republicans, and therefore under Texas you will find the only N on the Republican side of this vote.

    Why, did the Democrats vote no on this?

    http://thomas.loc.gov/cgi-bin/query/D?c108:1:./temp/~c108DLvIxQ::

    vote count:
    http://news.yahoo.com/news?tmpl=sto...co/house_rollcall_house_prisoners_1&printer=1
     
  2. DKSuddeth
    Offline

    DKSuddeth Senior Member

    Joined:
    Oct 20, 2003
    Messages:
    5,175
    Thanks Received:
    61
    Trophy Points:
    48
    Location:
    North Texas
    Ratings:
    +62
    the 49 democrats voted no to this because the resolution, as written by republicans, didn't stress that there should be adequate investigation/discipline. Ron Paul, whom I admire greatly, votes his conscience every time. While I can't find his reasoning on it yet, i'm sure it will turn up.

    It doesn't help that Hastert and Delay have to misstate Murth and try to make a huge political fiasco out of something they either didn't understand or didn't want to understand.
     
  3. no1tovote4
    Offline

    no1tovote4 VIP Member

    Joined:
    Apr 13, 2004
    Messages:
    10,294
    Thanks Received:
    616
    Trophy Points:
    83
    Location:
    Colorado
    Ratings:
    +616
    Cool enough I guess. Part 10 seems to read as support to the action in Iraq too.

    I can understand better now.
     
  4. insein
    Offline

    insein Senior Member

    Joined:
    Apr 10, 2004
    Messages:
    6,096
    Thanks Received:
    356
    Trophy Points:
    48
    Location:
    Philadelphia, Amazing huh...
    Ratings:
    +356
    Which just shows how out of the loop the congress is because an investigation on this incident (and im sure any others that have been brought to the chain of commands attention) has been ongoing since January. The only reason that we or congress even know about this incident is because the military told us they are investigating it.
     
  5. DKSuddeth
    Offline

    DKSuddeth Senior Member

    Joined:
    Oct 20, 2003
    Messages:
    5,175
    Thanks Received:
    61
    Trophy Points:
    48
    Location:
    North Texas
    Ratings:
    +62
    that doesn't appear to be true. Last I've been keeping up with it, the only reason congress knows is because CBS broke the story that General Myers asked them to supress.
     
  6. insein
    Offline

    insein Senior Member

    Joined:
    Apr 10, 2004
    Messages:
    6,096
    Thanks Received:
    356
    Trophy Points:
    48
    Location:
    Philadelphia, Amazing huh...
    Ratings:
    +356
    Still even if that is the case which i havent heard, an investigation had been ongoing since January. ITs not like these things happened last week when it was all released. If congress and the american people were polled, a majority would beleive that it occurred last week accoriding to TV.
     
  7. DKSuddeth
    Offline

    DKSuddeth Senior Member

    Joined:
    Oct 20, 2003
    Messages:
    5,175
    Thanks Received:
    61
    Trophy Points:
    48
    Location:
    North Texas
    Ratings:
    +62
    looks like they have been going on for some time though, according to this.

    news link

    ANTIOCH, California (Reuters) - Three U.S. military policemen who served at Baghdad's Abu Ghraib prison said on Thursday they had witnessed unreported cases of prisoner abuse and that the practice against Iraqis was commonplace.

    "It is a common thing to abuse prisoners," said Sgt. Mike Sindar, 25, of the Army National Guard's 870th Military Police Company based in the San Francisco Bay area. "I saw beatings all the time.

    "A lot of people had so much pent-up anger, so much aggression," he said. Sindar and the other military policemen, who have returned to California from Iraq, spoke in interviews with Reuters.
     

Share This Page