Taylor's death a grim reminder for us all

Discussion in 'Current Events' started by Shogun, Nov 29, 2007.

  1. Shogun
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    Shogun Free: Mudholes Stomped

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    Taylor's death a grim reminder for us all

    Jason Whitlock
    FOXSports.com, Updated 60 minutes ago

    There's a reason I call them the Black KKK. The pain, the fear and the destruction are all the same.

    Someone who loved Sean Taylor is crying right now. The life they knew has been destroyed, an 18-month-old baby lost her father, and, if you're a black man living in America, you've been reminded once again that your life is in constant jeopardy of violent death.

    The Black KKK claimed another victim, a high-profile professional football player with a checkered past this time.

    No, we don't know for certain the circumstances surrounding Taylor's death. I could very well be proven wrong for engaging in this sort of aggressive speculation. But it's no different than if you saw a fat man fall to the ground clutching his chest. You'd assume a heart attack, and you'd know, no matter the cause, the man needed to lose weight.

    Well, when shots are fired and a black man hits the pavement, there's every statistical reason to believe another black man pulled the trigger. That's not some negative, unfair stereotype. It's a reality we've been living with, tolerating and rationalizing for far too long.

    When the traditional, white KKK lynched, terrorized and intimidated black folks at a slower rate than its modern-day dark-skinned replacement, at least we had the good sense to be outraged and in no mood to contemplate rationalizations or be fooled by distractions.

    Our new millennium strategy is to pray the Black KKK goes away or ignores us. How's that working?

    About as well as the attempt to shift attention away from this uniquely African-American crisis by focusing on an "injustice" the white media allegedly perpetrated against Sean Taylor.

    Within hours of his death, there was a story circulating that members of the black press were complaining that news outlets were disrespecting Taylor's victimhood by reporting on his troubled past

    No disrespect to Taylor, but he controlled the way he would be remembered by the way he lived. His immature, undisciplined behavior with his employer, his run-ins with law enforcement, which included allegedly threatening a man with a loaded gun, and the fact a vehicle he owned was once sprayed with bullets are all pertinent details when you've been murdered.

    Marcellus Wiley, a former NFL player, made the radio circuit Wednesday, singing the tune that athletes are targets. That was his explanation for the murders of Taylor and Broncos cornerback Darrent Williams and the armed robberies of NBA players Antoine Walker and Eddy Curry.

    Really?

    Let's cut through the bull(manure) and deal with reality. Black men are targets of black men. Period. Go check the coroner's office and talk with a police detective. These bullets aren't checking W-2s.

    Rather than whine about white folks' insensitivity or reserve a special place of sorrow for rich athletes, we'd be better served mustering the kind of outrage and courage it took in the 1950s and 1960s to stop the white KKK from hanging black men from trees.

    But we don't want to deal with ourselves. We take great joy in prescribing medicine to cure the hate in other people's hearts. Meanwhile, our self-hatred, on full display for the world to see, remains untreated, undiagnosed and unrepentant.

    Our self-hatred has been set to music and reinforced by a pervasive culture that promotes a crab-in-barrel mentality.

    You're damn straight I blame hip hop for playing a role in the genocide of American black men. When your leading causes of death and dysfunction are murder, ignorance and incarceration, there's no reason to give a free pass to a culture that celebrates murder, ignorance and incarceration.

    Of course there are other catalysts, but until we recapture the minds of black youth, convince them that it's not OK to "super man dat ho" and end any and every dispute by "cocking on your bitch," nothing will change.

    Does a Soulja Boy want an education?

    HBO did a fascinating documentary on Little Rock Central High School, the Arkansas school that required the National Guard so that nine black kids could attend in the 1950s. Fifty years later, the school is one of the nation's best in terms of funding and educational opportunities. It's 60 percent black and located in a poor black community.

    Watch the documentary and ask yourself why nine poor kids in the '50s risked their lives to get a good education and a thousand poor black kids today ignore the opportunity that is served to them on a platter.

    Blame drugs, blame Ronald Reagan, blame George Bush, blame it on the rain or whatever. There's only one group of people who can change the rotten, anti-education, pro-violence culture our kids have adopted. We have to do it.

    According to reports, Sean Taylor had difficulty breaking free from the unsavory characters he associated with during his youth.

    The "keepin' it real" mantra of hip hop is in direct defiance to evolution. There's always someone ready to tell you you're selling out if you move away from the immature and dangerous activities you used to do, you're selling out if you speak proper English, embrace education, dress like a grown man, do anything mainstream.

    The Black KKK is enforcing the same crippling standards as its parent organization. It wants to keep black men in their place — uneducated, outside the mainstream and six feet deep.

    In all likelihood, the Black Klan and its mentality buried Sean Taylor, and any black man or boy reading this could be next.

    http://msn.foxsports.com/nfl/story/7499442?MSNHPHCP&GT1=10637
     
  2. hjmick
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    hjmick Gold Member

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    I always like to read Whitlock's thoughts. He is a very intelligent man. Unfortunately, many will, and do, label him an Uncle Tom rather than read and understand his words.

    I'm hoping Jim Rome will have him on his radio show very soon to discuss this editorial.
     
  3. hjmick
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    hjmick Gold Member

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    And what do you know, Jim just mentioned that Whitlock will be on the radio show in the second hour today.
     
  4. Shogun
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    hehehehe...

    You know, I keep thinking about how some of the more popular rap, r&b and hip hop have taken a whole 180 from the likes of James Brown's "Say it Loud - I'm Black and I'm Proud". I'm reading his autobiography right now and never realized how conservative he was.. to the point of being called an uncle tom too. I would suggest this book to any one of my conservative comrades as a surprising treat from the Godfather of Soul. I think they will appreciate how the man chose to react to the 60s race issues. His message being "Build it, don't burn it" Granted, he did end up liking the pcp a little too much.. and who could forget the famous mugshot (I didn't know that it was taken after a two day power outage in California which was a significant factor in his appearance). I've never been much on assuming role model status to famous people but I think there is miles of progress to be made in the realms of minority violence, self identity, music and social pop culture regarding where we are at today in contrast to the 60's. On one hand, I refuse to act like Tipper Gore but I have to admit that Whitlock makes valid points that I, as an external white dude, probably can't get away with suggesting.


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  5. midcan5
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    midcan5 liberal / progressive

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    Jason Whitlock is a complete moron. The Black KKK? is he saying Blacks hate other Blacks because they are Black? what a jackass, the robber, if it was a robber could as easily have been white. Can one imagine the saintly mafia after the hundredth gang killing writing crap like this and and acting like it had relevance? Put your money where your mouth is, get out there and raise the level of the people on the bottom, take some of that sports money and build the inner city - that even assumes some poor Black shot this paragon of spoiled athletic American immaturity. Help build values in the inner city that support the kids, if the culture is one of violence then go after the tools, the ideas that propagate violence and make it the only choice for some. The damn fool ought to read about the KKK before he compares modern day crooks to that hateful bunch.
     
  6. Shogun
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    I think he makes a valid point about how variables of culture have derailed the effort of the civil rights movement. Perhaps his comparison to the klan is not spot on but i'd suggest that the result is similar.
     
  7. CrpRavens30
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    Ur a complete tool.. Whitlock is spot on with the article.. Do you honestly believe this was a real robbery? Taylor was a thug, he associated with thugs and died like a thug.. Whitlock was commenting that the black kkk is this thug lifestyle that is so popular and admired in black america..

    No one can build up the inner city with money.. The people need to change and want to change before any amount of money will help there situation.. Its all on them.. Welfare and Section 8 housing really has helped the poor black community right? WRONG.. It has enabled them to not work and not to improve there standing in society..

    Use you eyes and common sense instead of your idiotic liberal thinking..
     
  8. Shogun
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    Rolle: Taylor was targeted
    Ex-Miami teammate says friend lived in constant fear

    TEMPE, Ariz. (AP) -- Still in disbelief of his childhood friend's shooting death, Arizona Cardinals cornerback Antrel Rolle vowed Wednesday to make sure Sean Taylor is remembered.

    He added he did not believe the killing was part of a burglary gone sour, and that Taylor had many enemies on the streets of Miami.

    "This was not the first incident," Rolle said. "They've been targeting him for three years now."

    Rolle said many former "friends" had it in for Taylor, who was trying to build a more stable life.

    "He really didn't say too much," Rolle said, "but I know he lived his life pretty much scared every day of his life when he was down in Miami because those people were targeting him. At least, he's got peace now."

    Rolle and Taylor, whose fathers were policemen in Homestead, Fla., started playing football together when they were 6 years old. They went on to become University of Miami teammates and NFL first-round draft picks. Both wore No. 21, Rolle for the Cardinals, Taylor for the Washington Redskins.

    Rolle said he hadn't talked to Taylor in a while, and that the Redskin had withdrawn from the crowd he hung around with to build a new life with his girlfriend and young daughter.

    "There was so much surrounding him," Rolle said. "Everyone was talking about him bad, so he just had to distance himself from everyone and live a life of his own. ... Within the last year, I've never seen anyone make such a dramatic change,"

    Withdrawing from a bad crowd isn't easy, though, Rolle said.

    "They say it was a burglary. It absolutely was not a burglary," he said. "Down South, where we're from, there were many people targeting Sean, a lot of jealousy, a lot of angry people.

    "Sean, he had a large group of friends, and he no longer hung out with those friends, so you never know where this came from."

    Rolle said his family rushed to the hospital to be with Taylor's family following the shooting.

    "It really hasn't hit me yet," Rolle said, "the fact that I'm never going to see his face again, his ways, him performing on the field. My heart goes out to his girlfriend, his family, his little kid."

    Rolle will leave immediately after Sunday's game against Cleveland on a flight to Miami, where he will attend Monday's memorial service. But Rolle wants fans to keep remembering Taylor as the player he was and the man he was becoming after some rough years.

    "I'm going to keep his name alive," Rolle said. "Every time I make a play, I'm definitely going to mention him. I'm going to represent my 21 as his 21."

    Rolle said he and Taylor became friends as 6-year-old teammates for the Homestead Hurricanes. Later, when they played against each other, Rolle was a running back and Taylor a linebacker.

    "They'd call a sweep one way," Rolle said. "I would look at him on that side, and I would change the play myself and go the other way because I knew he would try to knock my head off."

    Rolle was an All-American as a senior in 2004 and was picked eighth overall by the Cardinals. A year before, Taylor earned similar honors at Miami, then went to Washington as the fifth overall choice.

    "I definitely will go out there and play and do everything I can do because I know how much he loved the game," Rolle said. "I don't think there was anyone who lived it or took it as seriously as he did. I just told myself I'm not going to let his name die. We started when we were 6 years old, and we're going to finish it together."

    Copyright 2007 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.


    http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/2007/football/nfl/11/29/rolle.taylor.ap/index.html
     
  9. jillian
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    I'm going to disagree with you on this one, too. I think the term Black KKK is just puffery and for effect. I also think it is ill-used. However, there is no question that young black men die far too often at the hands of other young black men. Among poor blacks, there is a cultural bias AGAINST education which leaves the most studious and most successful at high risk of violence from other teens. There is an undercurrent of self-hatred in a lot of the cultural mores found in SOME black circles (though far from all as there's also a growing black gentry).

    While I don't agree with much of the piece, I think it's certainly fair to look at things from multiple perspectives.
     
  10. William Joyce
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    With all due respect to Mr. Whitlock, whose columns go places others fear, this isn't really a grim reminder for us all. Most of us are not hyper-talented black ghetto thug athletes with millions of dollars to spare and an itch to keep it real with the homies. That combination is what killed Sean Taylor.
     

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