On The 'Standardized Tests' Battlefront!

Discussion in 'Education' started by PoliticalChic, Apr 24, 2012.

  1. PoliticalChic
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    PoliticalChic Diamond Member

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    1. “"The Greatest Generation" is a term coined by journalist Tom Brokaw to describe the generation[1] who grew up in the United States during the deprivation of theGreat Depression, and then went on to fight in World War II, as well as those whose productivity within the war's home front made a decisive material contribution to the war effort.”
    Greatest Generation - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    We’ll never see their like again. Why? From a student:
    “Dear Reading DCAS,
    Why do you have to be hard? I know I do your tests in the beginning, middle, and end of the year. But doing 55 questions in 3 days is a lot. We have to take our time to get a good score, otherwise we might get a 1 and that’s not good. Can we see what questions we dot right and what questions we got wrong at the end of the test? So that way we can understand why we got whatever we got wrong was wrong. I think that could help us a lot. How about that idea for next year? It really could help. Otherwise DCAS has to be THE WORST THING EVER!!!”
    Diary of a Public School Teacher!

    2. And this:
    Monday, April 23, 2012
    The past week has been a nightmare for New York students, their teachers and their principals
    The past week has been a nightmare for New York students in Grades 3 through 8, their teachers and their principals. Not only were the New York State ELA exams too long and exhausting for young students, (three exams of 90 minutes each), they contained ambiguous questions that cannot be answered with assurance, problems with test booklet instructions, inadequate space for students to write essays, and reading comprehension passages that defy commonsense. …students were mechanically ‘filling in bubbles’ due to exhaustion…”
    NYC Public School Parents


    3. “In his recent State of the State address, Governor Cuomo said he wants to be an advocate for children. Let him lobby to protect their natural curiosity and love of learning from the onslaught of anti-intellectual, ends-oriented teaching practices forced on our educators by over-emphasis on standardized tests.” Dear Governor: Lobby to Save a Love of Reading

    4. Now, truth be told, I am a firm believer in tests, and in testing.

    a. There is no doubt that education, nationally, is not giving the result that I would wish.
    b. Tests serve as a window into the problems.
    c. “Teaching to the test” is deplored in education circles, although that complaint is easily answered: if the test faithfully mirrors the skills and knowledge set out in the standards, then preparing one’s pupils to ace such a test is an honorable mission!” Chester E. Finn, Jr. Former Assistant Secretary of Education, “Troublemaker.”
    d. Both challenges and competition prepare one for life.


    5. But the purpose of this essay is not to convince any who have an alternate view of tests and testing….rather it is to empower. The answer is both simple and efficacious. Vouchers.
    The funds dedicated to education should go where the child goes, and the child goes to the kind of institution chosen by the parents. Like testing? Send your scion to a school that believes as you do. No tests….your choice, as is the school. Unschool? Homeschool? Religious School. Local school. Your free choice.

    That’s the conservative view....everything is political.
    Everything.
     
  2. psikeyhackr
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    psikeyhackr VIP Member

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    Just because tests are standardised does not mean they are not stupid.

    Are they designed to create standardised stupidity among people who think they are smart because they conform?

    psik
     
  3. PoliticalChic
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    PoliticalChic Diamond Member

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    No....they are designed to detect inadequacies....

    ...some in students, some in teachers.....



    In 23 states the results are included in the evaluation of the teachers.
     
  4. psikeyhackr
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    psikeyhackr VIP Member

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    So where is the evidence that these tests have accomplished something useful besides make money for the test creators?

    psik
     
  5. PoliticalChic
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    PoliticalChic Diamond Member

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    Now, sikky...you know better than to use a non sequitur like that.

    Once the inadequacies are laid bare, there is no direct line to their remediation.

    Hold students back?

    Fire teachers and administrators?

    Change curricula?

    There are roadblocks at ever level for every cure...

    But some things are blowing in the wind:

    "11:16 p.m. | Updated After about an hour of discussion, the Panel for Educational Policy voted Thursday night to close 18 city schools and remove the middle school grades from 5 more.

    As expected, the panelists, most of whom were appointed by Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg, voted to approve all the school closing recommendations. The representatives for Manhattan, Queens, the Bronx and Brooklyn voted against most of the closing proposals.

    The representative for Staten Island voted with the mayor’s block, except for the proposal to close P.S. 14, the first school to be recommended for closing in her borough."
    The School-Closing Vote
     
  6. psikeyhackr
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    psikeyhackr VIP Member

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    I'm a test flunker. I don't know anything of the kind. :lol:

    psik
     
  7. blimpo
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    blimpo Active Member

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    Being in the midst of 'standardized testing, I can sadly say most of the 7th and 8th graders being tested really don't care about test results or try on the tests.

    They have no reward at this level and know the only ones held accountable are the teachers and the school. They don't take testing seriously, only as a break from regular classes.

    As far as teacher evaluations being tied to test scores:

    If teachers knew their job security was tied to the work ethic of 13 and 14 year olds they probably wouldn't have taken the job.

    Would you?
     
  8. PoliticalChic
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    PoliticalChic Diamond Member

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    "I can sadly say most of the 7th and 8th graders being tested really don't care about test results or try on the tests."

    Mine does.
     
  9. Katzndogz
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    How many of them cry unfair when they get a low score?
     
  10. PoliticalChic
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    PoliticalChic Diamond Member

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    "Making the grade: NJ to make high school tests harder
    Posted on April 30, 2012 by Jason Method
    TRENTON – Gov. Chris Christie and state education officials announced today that New Jersey would begin implementing tougher high school examinations as early as next year.

    Although students will not be required to pass the new tests in order to obtain a diploma for four years, the regime will usher in an era whereby students will need to meet more rigorous standards to graduate from high school."
    Making the grade: NJ to make high school tests harder | Capitol Quickies
     

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