House Bill Would Make It Harder To Prosecute White-Collar Crime

Discussion in 'Congress' started by Penelope, Jan 31, 2016.

  1. Penelope
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    Penelope Gold Member

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    House Bill Would Make It Harder To Prosecute White-Collar Crime

    CEOs could be off the hook for even gross negligence.

    11/16/2015 03:23 pm ET

    WASHINGTON -- House Republicans on Monday unveiled legislation that would decriminalize a broad swath of corporate malfeasance, a move that injects white-collar crime issues into the thus-far bipartisan agenda on criminal justice reform.

    The public debate over criminal justice reform has focused on reducing severe sentences for nonviolent drug offenses. But some influential conservative voices, including the billionaire Koch brothers and the Heritage Foundation, have quietly advocated for curbing prosecution of corporate offenses as well.

    The House bill would eliminate a host of white-collar crimes where the damaging acts are merely reckless, negligent or grossly negligent. If enacted, it would make it more difficult for federal authorities to pursue executive wrongdoing, from financial fraud to environmental pollution.


    House Bill Would Make It Harder To Prosecute White-Collar Crime

    White collar crimes should have more investigation and prosecution, NOT LESS. Steaing millions from taxpayers is worst than smoking pot.
     
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  2. waltky
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    waltky Wise ol' monkey Supporting Member

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    Gov't. gettin' lax on white collar crime...

    Federal White Collar Convictions Dipped To ‘20-Year Historic Low’ in 2015
    April 12, 2016 -- White collar convictions by the Department of Justice (DOJ) dipped to a “20-year historic low” in 2015, according to data obtained from the Executive Office of the U.S. Attorney under the Freedom of Information Act and analyzed by the Transactional Records Access Clearinghouse (TRAC) at Syracuse University. “Convictions over the past year are still much lower than they were five years ago,” TRAC reported.
     
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