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West Virginia: The Legislation Joe Manchin Is Holding Up Would Help His State — A Lot

Lakhota

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West Virginia struggles with the exact problems that Biden’s spending bill aims to fix.

West Virginia has long been synonymous with rural poverty and, today, its median income is the nation’s second lowest, behind only Mississippi.

For much of the 20th century, that bred public support for muscular government action and led to the election of Democratic senators like Robert Byrd, who used his long tenure on the Appropriations Committee to secure for the state more than $10 billion worth of public works, and Jay Rockefeller, who championed Medicaid and helped develop the federal Children’s Health Insurance Program. Today, roughly one in four West Virginians get medical coverage through those programs.

But like the rest of Appalachia and the South, West Virginia has increasingly elected Republicans. West Virginia’s Republicans haven’t crusaded for smaller government in the way, say, former House Speaker Paul Ryan (R-Wis.) once did, but they also have not supported major expansions of government programs, even as the state’s needs have quite obviously grown.

The national shift of more women into the workforce has increased the demand for child care, while an aging population living with more disabilities has increased the demand for long-term care, including home and community supports that let elderly and disabled people live in private homes and stay out of institutions. The latter need is especially acute in West Virginia, where the proportion of residents older than 65 is third highest in the nation.

All of that helps to explain why, in a recent report card on “care policies” by The Century Foundation, West Virginia was one of five states to get an F. The survey considered the quality, affordability and availability of a variety of programs, including child care and home care and paid leave for workers.

And although even the low-scoring states had some strong programs ― West Virginia, for example, has won praise for its universal pre-kindergarten initiative ― the overall level of support in these are, according to the report, “leaving families to scramble to manage work, care and family, creating impossible conflicts that lead to economic insecurity, poor health, added stress, and growing inequality.”

Much more at the link below...


Manchin is hurting West Virginia. He seems to be using spending and inflation as his excuses for blocking Biden's legislation. He is even against the For the People Act to protect voting rights. He also seems to be hung up on getting Republican support and defending the filibuster. What do you think?
 
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Lakhota

Lakhota

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From the OP:

Why West Virginia Needs So Much Help

West Virginia has long been synonymous with rural poverty and, today, its median income is the nation’s second lowest, behind only Mississippi.

For much of the 20th century, that bred public support for muscular government action and led to the election of Democratic senators like Robert Byrd, who used his long tenure on the Appropriations Committee to secure for the state more than $10 billion worth of public works, and Jay Rockefeller, who championed Medicaid and helped develop the federal Children’s Health Insurance Program. Today, roughly one in four West Virginians get medical coverage through those programs.

But like the rest of Appalachia and the South, West Virginia has increasingly elected Republicans. West Virginia’s Republicans haven’t crusaded for smaller government in the way, say, former House Speaker Paul Ryan (R-Wis.) once did, but they also have not supported major expansions of government programs, even as the state’s needs have quite obviously grown.

The national shift of more women into the workforce has increased the demand for child care, while an aging population living with more disabilities has increased the demand for long-term care, including home and community supports that let elderly and disabled people live in private homes and stay out of institutions. The latter need is especially acute in West Virginia, where the proportion of residents older than 65 is third highest in the nation.

All of that helps to explain why, in a recent report card on “care policies” by The Century Foundation, West Virginia was one of five states to get an F. The survey considered the quality, affordability and availability of a variety of programs, including child care and home care and paid leave for workers.

And although even the low-scoring states had some strong programs ― West Virginia, for example, has won praise for its universal pre-kindergarten initiative ― the overall level of support in these are, according to the report, “leaving families to scramble to manage work, care and family, creating impossible conflicts that lead to economic insecurity, poor health, added stress, and growing inequality.”
 
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Lakhota

Lakhota

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From the OP:

What The Democrats’ Bill Could Mean For West Virginia


These sorts of hardships and pressures are precisely the ones that Biden and Democrats hope to alleviate with the new legislation, which House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) has said could come up for a vote as soon as this week. One of the bill’s components, for example, would make permanent a temporary program ― first enacted in the COVID-19 relief package ― that is sending monthly checks to families with children. In West Virginia, that proposal could lift 23,000 children out of poverty, according to a projection from the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities.

Yet another initiative in the legislation would bolster “home- and community-based services” for disabled and elderly Americans. If fully funded, the money could wipe out waiting lists that exist in many states and raise the wages of care providers, which advocates say would both improve the quality of care and make it easier to attract more workers. That could make a big difference in West Virginia, where home care workers today make less than $10 an hour and where, according to projections from the research and advocacy organization PHI, the state will need to fill almost 30,000 home care jobs over the next decade.

And then there is the child care initiative. The proposal inside the Build Back Better plan started out as a free-standing piece of legislation, the Child Care for Working Families Act, first introduced by Sen. Patty Murray (D-Wash.) and Rep. Bobby Scott (D-Va.) in 2017. It would give states funding to subsidize child care, much as they do now, but with a goal of making sure it costs no family more than 7% of its income. At the same time, money could only go to programs that meet a set of quality standards and pay workers better.

The inevitably high cost of trying to do those two things together ― capping expenses for families while simultaneously making many existing providers spend more on facilities and workers ― explains why the provisional plan Democrats crafted over the summer envisioned about $450 billion in new outlays over 10 years.

But the money would make a tangible difference for families. For a typical middle class family in West Virginia, weekly child care costs would fall roughly in half, from $198 to $96 and from 10.4% of household income to 5.0%, according to a new projection from the Center for American Progress.

That sort of help could make an especially big difference in rural areas, Kelly Allen, executive director for the West Virginia Center on Budget and Policy, told HuffPost. “There are entire counties that don’t have child care centers at all,” Allen said. “And then that doesn’t even speak to the affordability issue for families that do have a child care center nearby but are on a waiting list or can’t afford to pay for it.”

McFall can attest to that personally. Even with the subsidies, many parents struggle to cover tuition. She said she does her best to help those families, by tapping into a small scholarship fund supported by local donors and by letting them pay late when she can. “It’s very hard to look at a parent, for her to say ‘I can’t buy groceries this week because my car broke down and I really can’t pay you either,’” McFall said. “How can then say, you have to pay your child care?
 
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theHawk

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Poor communists. Can’t even sell your pile of shit to your own party.
 

WelfareQueen

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West Virginia struggles with the exact problems that Biden’s spending bill aims to fix.

West Virginia has long been synonymous with rural poverty and, today, its median income is the nation’s second lowest, behind only Mississippi.

For much of the 20th century, that bred public support for muscular government action and led to the election of Democratic senators like Robert Byrd, who used his long tenure on the Appropriations Committee to secure for the state more than $10 billion worth of public works, and Jay Rockefeller, who championed Medicaid and helped develop the federal Children’s Health Insurance Program. Today, roughly one in four West Virginians get medical coverage through those programs.

But like the rest of Appalachia and the South, West Virginia has increasingly elected Republicans. West Virginia’s Republicans haven’t crusaded for smaller government in the way, say, former House Speaker Paul Ryan (R-Wis.) once did, but they also have not supported major expansions of government programs, even as the state’s needs have quite obviously grown.

The national shift of more women into the workforce has increased the demand for child care, while an aging population living with more disabilities has increased the demand for long-term care, including home and community supports that let elderly and disabled people live in private homes and stay out of institutions. The latter need is especially acute in West Virginia, where the proportion of residents older than 65 is third highest in the nation.

All of that helps to explain why, in a recent report card on “care policies” by The Century Foundation, West Virginia was one of five states to get an F. The survey considered the quality, affordability and availability of a variety of programs, including child care and home care and paid leave for workers.

And although even the low-scoring states had some strong programs ― West Virginia, for example, has won praise for its universal pre-kindergarten initiative ― the overall level of support in these are, according to the report, “leaving families to scramble to manage work, care and family, creating impossible conflicts that lead to economic insecurity, poor health, added stress, and growing inequality.”

Much more at the link below...


Manchin is hurting West Virginia. He seems to be using spending and inflation as his excuses for blocking Biden's legislation. What do you think?


Yep....Dims are all about helping the poor folks of West Virginia. Remember Hillary telling West Virginia coal miners she was gonna put them all out of work? And the Green New Deal bullshit in this Bill is supposed to help West Virginians how? :lol:

Nobody but a Dim could buy this much bullshit.
 

BULLDOG

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Yep....Dims are all about helping the poor folks of West Virginia. Remember Hillary telling West Virginia coal miners she was gonna put them all out of work? And the Green New Deal bullshit in this Bill is supposed to help West Virginians how? :lol:

Nobody but a Dim could buy this much bullshit.
And trump did so much to help the coal miners during his presidency, didn't he?
1632723413129.png
 

OKTexas

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West Virginia struggles with the exact problems that Biden’s spending bill aims to fix.

West Virginia has long been synonymous with rural poverty and, today, its median income is the nation’s second lowest, behind only Mississippi.

For much of the 20th century, that bred public support for muscular government action and led to the election of Democratic senators like Robert Byrd, who used his long tenure on the Appropriations Committee to secure for the state more than $10 billion worth of public works, and Jay Rockefeller, who championed Medicaid and helped develop the federal Children’s Health Insurance Program. Today, roughly one in four West Virginians get medical coverage through those programs.

But like the rest of Appalachia and the South, West Virginia has increasingly elected Republicans. West Virginia’s Republicans haven’t crusaded for smaller government in the way, say, former House Speaker Paul Ryan (R-Wis.) once did, but they also have not supported major expansions of government programs, even as the state’s needs have quite obviously grown.

The national shift of more women into the workforce has increased the demand for child care, while an aging population living with more disabilities has increased the demand for long-term care, including home and community supports that let elderly and disabled people live in private homes and stay out of institutions. The latter need is especially acute in West Virginia, where the proportion of residents older than 65 is third highest in the nation.

All of that helps to explain why, in a recent report card on “care policies” by The Century Foundation, West Virginia was one of five states to get an F. The survey considered the quality, affordability and availability of a variety of programs, including child care and home care and paid leave for workers.

And although even the low-scoring states had some strong programs ― West Virginia, for example, has won praise for its universal pre-kindergarten initiative ― the overall level of support in these are, according to the report, “leaving families to scramble to manage work, care and family, creating impossible conflicts that lead to economic insecurity, poor health, added stress, and growing inequality.”

Much more at the link below...


Manchin is hurting West Virginia. He seems to be using spending and inflation as his excuses for blocking Biden's legislation. He is even against the For the People Act to protect voting rights. He also seems to be hung up on getting Republican support and defending the filibuster. What do you think?


He knows the bill will kill the economy in the long run, he's not as stupid as you commies.

.
 
OP
Lakhota

Lakhota

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pknopp

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I believe he has said it needs paid for. I agree.
 

Votto

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Poor communists. Can’t even sell your pile of shit to your own party.
Well we were promised by Schumer that all Dims had to do was elect those Congressmen in Georgia in the special election and they would do everything they wanted since it would give them a majority.

Another lie
 

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Mad_Jack_Flint

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Poor communists. Can’t even sell your pile of shit to your own party.
Because Manchin is a Blue Dog Democrat that want Biden and Harris to have some fiscal responsibility seeing what they are wanting to pass will make sure the Democratic Party will lose the House and Senate next year and the Oval Office in 2024.
 

Aldo Raine

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From the OP:

What The Democrats’ Bill Could Mean For West Virginia


These sorts of hardships and pressures are precisely the ones that Biden and Democrats hope to alleviate with the new legislation, which House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) has said could come up for a vote as soon as this week. One of the bill’s components, for example, would make permanent a temporary program ― first enacted in the COVID-19 relief package ― that is sending monthly checks to families with children. In West Virginia, that proposal could lift 23,000 children out of poverty, according to a projection from the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities.

Yet another initiative in the legislation would bolster “home- and community-based services” for disabled and elderly Americans. If fully funded, the money could wipe out waiting lists that exist in many states and raise the wages of care providers, which advocates say would both improve the quality of care and make it easier to attract more workers. That could make a big difference in West Virginia, where home care workers today make less than $10 an hour and where, according to projections from the research and advocacy organization PHI, the state will need to fill almost 30,000 home care jobs over the next decade.

And then there is the child care initiative. The proposal inside the Build Back Better plan started out as a free-standing piece of legislation, the Child Care for Working Families Act, first introduced by Sen. Patty Murray (D-Wash.) and Rep. Bobby Scott (D-Va.) in 2017. It would give states funding to subsidize child care, much as they do now, but with a goal of making sure it costs no family more than 7% of its income. At the same time, money could only go to programs that meet a set of quality standards and pay workers better.

The inevitably high cost of trying to do those two things together ― capping expenses for families while simultaneously making many existing providers spend more on facilities and workers ― explains why the provisional plan Democrats crafted over the summer envisioned about $450 billion in new outlays over 10 years.

But the money would make a tangible difference for families. For a typical middle class family in West Virginia, weekly child care costs would fall roughly in half, from $198 to $96 and from 10.4% of household income to 5.0%, according to a new projection from the Center for American Progress.

That sort of help could make an especially big difference in rural areas, Kelly Allen, executive director for the West Virginia Center on Budget and Policy, told HuffPost. “There are entire counties that don’t have child care centers at all,” Allen said. “And then that doesn’t even speak to the affordability issue for families that do have a child care center nearby but are on a waiting list or can’t afford to pay for it.”

McFall can attest to that personally. Even with the subsidies, many parents struggle to cover tuition. She said she does her best to help those families, by tapping into a small scholarship fund supported by local donors and by letting them pay late when she can. “It’s very hard to look at a parent, for her to say ‘I can’t buy groceries this week because my car broke down and I really can’t pay you either,’” McFall said. “How can then say, you have to pay your child care?


Fuck um, they want them some "small" gubnit right wingnuts let them have them!!!
MAGA
 

Whodatsaywhodat.

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Because Manchin is a Blue Dog Democrat that want Biden and Harris to have some fiscal responsibility seeing what they are wanting to pass will make sure the Democratic Party will lose the House and Senate next year and the Oval Office in 2024.
Blue dog Democrats do not exist anymore, the went the way of the dinosaur. All that is left are dickhead Democrats.
 

22lcidw

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Fuck um, they want them some "small" gubnit right wingnuts let them have them!!!
MAGA
There has been a massive amount of resources spent on West Virginia. Look at the cities. endless resources and the ghettos just do not go away. Cities more and more depend on suburbs, semi rural and rural areas of the state to pay for their useless ways. You speak of right wingnuts. But why are the city ghettos still here with all the money spent on them? In fact they are growing.
 

Mad_Jack_Flint

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Blue dog Democrats do not exist anymore, the went the way of the dinosaur. All that is left are dickhead Democrats.
Well that is your opinion and you are entitled to it but Manchin has always been a Conservative Democrat from his home State, so let be clear he is a Blue Dog and they still exist…
 

andaronjim

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Fuck um, they want them some "small" gubnit right wingnuts let them have them!!!
MAGA
That is the spirit to bring unity to the country...
 

andaronjim

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Well that is your opinion and you are entitled to it but Manchin has always been a Conservative Democrat from his home State, so let be clear he is a Blue Dog and they still exist…
I must admit that Joe Manchin has always voted before, with siding with Democrats...
 

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