Unmanned Aerial Vehicles Coming soon to Anytown USA

MuslimAgorist

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"First there were drones in Pakistan and I said nothing because I wasn't Pakistani. Then there were drones in Yemen and I said nothing because I wasn't Yemeni. Now there are drones in the US and everyone is afraid to speak."
The full story

Let’s break it down:

1) Drone strikes against US citizens branded “terrorists” are ok.
2) Collateral Damage of US citizens during Drone strikes is ok.
3) The definition of “combatant” has drifted to include inciteful speech.
4) The definition of “terrorist” has drifted to include crimes of dissent.
5) Drones are being programed to detect dissent.
6) Domestic police will soon be using unmanned aerial vehicles.
7) Military technology trickles down to local law enforcement.

Are you seeing the pattern yet?
 

waltky

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Military Drones Hit By Computer Virus?...
:eek:
Report: Computer virus hits military drone program
Oct 8,`11 WASHINGTON (AP) - A computer virus that captures the strokes on a keyboard has infected networks used by pilots who control U.S. Air Force drones flown on the warfront, according to a published report.
Wired magazine reported Friday that the spyware has resisted efforts to remove it from the computers in the cockpits at Creech Air Force Base in Nevada, where pilots remotely fly Predator and Reaper drones in places like Iraq and Afghanistan.

The story said there are no confirmed reports that classified data was stolen and that the virus did not stop pilots from flying any of their missions. Network security specialists are uncertain if the virus was part of a directed attack or accidentally infected the networks, the story said.

The Air Force said in a statement it doesn't discuss threats to its computer networks because it can help hackers refine their tactics.

Source
See also:

Military drones flying despite worries about computer virus
The computer systems that control the U.S. military's Predator and Reaper drones have been beset by a persistent computer virus, according to reports surfacing Friday.
The virus is apparently logging the keystrokes of pilots at the Nevada air base as they operate the remote controls for the robo-planes that fly over Afghanistan and other areas, Wired's Danger Room reported:

"The virus, first detected nearly two weeks ago by the military’s Host-Based Security System, has not prevented pilots at Creech Air Force Base in Nevada from flying their missions overseas. Nor have there been any confirmed incidents of classified information being lost or sent to an outside source. But the virus has resisted multiple efforts to remove it from Creech’s computers, network security specialists say. And the infection underscores the ongoing security risks in what has become the U.S. military’s most important weapons system."

Wired's Noah Shachtman cites three sources regarding the virus, with one of them saying, "We keep wiping it off, and it keeps coming back ... We think it's benign. But we just don't know." Reuters quoted its sources as saying government officials are still investigating exactly what effect the virus is having, and how it managed to infect the air base's computer systems. "Something is going on, but it has not had any impact on the missions overseas," one unnamed source told the news service.

Msnbc.com has sought comment from the Air Force and the Defense Information Systems Agency, the Pentagon office responsible for the Host-Based Security System, but there has been no official response to telephone and email inquiries. The Air Force declined to discuss the issue openly with Wired, but Shachtman quoted insiders as saying that senior officers at Creech are getting daily briefings about the virus. "It's getting a lot of attention," one source is quoted as saying. "But no one's panicking. Yet."

Source
 

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