U.S. Open women's final features Naomi Osaka's masks, Black hair and a bold cultural statement

Meathead

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I'm sure there are people who are unaware that this bias against black hair styles is a "thing". I mentioned it once to some German friends while visiting Germany several decades ago, although I didn't present it as a bias but that wearing my hair straight instead of in natural styles seems to make the white people I worked with more "comfortable".

Naomi Osaka’s hair doesn’t impact her 120 mph serve or powerful baseline play. But it does impact how she is perceived in the bright, white tennis world.

2020 US Open - Day 5
Naomi Osaka of Japan looks on during her Women's Singles third round match against Marta Kostyuk of the Ukraine on Day Five of the 2020 US Open.Al Bello / Getty Images

Sept. 12, 2020, 10:57 AM PDT​
By Robyn Autry, chair of the Sociology Department at Wesleyan University​
Naomi Osaka’s hair doesn’t matter. At least not when it comes to her 120 mph serve, her daunting forehand or her powerful baseline play. But it does matter in terms of how she shows up in the tennis world and how she’s emerged as one of the most prominent athletes supporting the Black Lives Matter protests.
On Saturday, Osaka will play in the U.S. Open women's finals against Victoria Azarenka, who earned her bid by defeating Serena Williams. Both women will be looking to capture a third Grand Slam title.​
Osaka has grabbed headlines this tournament by wearing masks emblazoned with the names of victims of racial violence.​
Alongside her outstanding athleticism, though, Osaka has grabbed headlines this tournament by wearing masks emblazoned with the names of victims of racial violence: Philando Castile, Trayvon Martin, Ahmaud Arbery, George Floyd, Breonna Taylor and Elijah McClain. Black masks, white lettering. Her one-person protest feels even more powerful as she enters and exits the nearly empty stadium every match.​
The masks draw our eyes up, but this is nothing new when it comes to Osaka. With her thick hair often pulled into a high ponytail and up through a visor, Osaka is accustomed to making a statement. It’s the sort of statement that Black bodies always make, whether intended or not, in predominately white spaces. As Claudia Rankine wrote about Serena Williams in “Citizen: An American Lyric” — referencing Zora Neale Hurston — Black players appear against the sharp white backdrop of the tennis world.​
2020 US Open - Day 5
Naomi Osaka of Japan wears a protective face mask with the name Ahmaud Arbery stenciled on it on Day Five of the 2020 US Open at USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center on Sept. 4, 2020 in Queens, N.Y.Al Bello / Getty Images
It's hard to imagine anything more meaningless than this woman's hair. Why would anyone give a rat's ass?
I will help you-----believe it or not----black people are
OBSESSED with their hair. Whilst you or I might not
waste a single neuronal synapse on the issue, try to
understand that a people obsessed with their hair are
likely to assume that EVERYONE else shares that
obsession
Thanks. I thought that they would be more obsessed with thugs killing each other than their hair, but maybe that's just me.
 

Godboy

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I watched some of the match. It never crossed my mind once that she had "Black Hair". It does puzzle me why many famous Black women like Mary J Blidge have a 'do' that looks like this.

View attachment 387913
What don't you like about it?
I said it puzzles me why a Black woman would do her hair like a White woman. Just the same way it would puzzle me if Taylor Swift put on an Afro wig.
You want segregated hair?
Hair segregation is an exclusively black phenomenon. Well, they wear white hair styles with no issue, but they get mad when white people wear black hair styles. There are tons of cultural appropriation videos, but not a single one involves a black person with blonde hair. Its always some poor white kid with dreads getting shit on for having dreads, or a white celebrity with a wacky hairdo. Poor Adele.

so true-----and IT AIN'T JUST HAIR. Remember when the DASHIKI became a thing? -----it was in the 1960s. It is a nice loose colorful shirt that can be either male or female-----the only reason I did not
get one is because I did not want to experience ANGER from black people
Yeah, black anger and violence is why people dont trust them. Sucky cultures need to learn that there is a price to pay for being sucky.
 

irosie91

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I'm sure there are people who are unaware that this bias against black hair styles is a "thing". I mentioned it once to some German friends while visiting Germany several decades ago, although I didn't present it as a bias but that wearing my hair straight instead of in natural styles seems to make the white people I worked with more "comfortable".

Naomi Osaka’s hair doesn’t impact her 120 mph serve or powerful baseline play. But it does impact how she is perceived in the bright, white tennis world.

2020 US Open - Day 5
Naomi Osaka of Japan looks on during her Women's Singles third round match against Marta Kostyuk of the Ukraine on Day Five of the 2020 US Open.Al Bello / Getty Images

Sept. 12, 2020, 10:57 AM PDT​
By Robyn Autry, chair of the Sociology Department at Wesleyan University​
Naomi Osaka’s hair doesn’t matter. At least not when it comes to her 120 mph serve, her daunting forehand or her powerful baseline play. But it does matter in terms of how she shows up in the tennis world and how she’s emerged as one of the most prominent athletes supporting the Black Lives Matter protests.
On Saturday, Osaka will play in the U.S. Open women's finals against Victoria Azarenka, who earned her bid by defeating Serena Williams. Both women will be looking to capture a third Grand Slam title.​
Osaka has grabbed headlines this tournament by wearing masks emblazoned with the names of victims of racial violence.​
Alongside her outstanding athleticism, though, Osaka has grabbed headlines this tournament by wearing masks emblazoned with the names of victims of racial violence: Philando Castile, Trayvon Martin, Ahmaud Arbery, George Floyd, Breonna Taylor and Elijah McClain. Black masks, white lettering. Her one-person protest feels even more powerful as she enters and exits the nearly empty stadium every match.​
The masks draw our eyes up, but this is nothing new when it comes to Osaka. With her thick hair often pulled into a high ponytail and up through a visor, Osaka is accustomed to making a statement. It’s the sort of statement that Black bodies always make, whether intended or not, in predominately white spaces. As Claudia Rankine wrote about Serena Williams in “Citizen: An American Lyric” — referencing Zora Neale Hurston — Black players appear against the sharp white backdrop of the tennis world.​
2020 US Open - Day 5
Naomi Osaka of Japan wears a protective face mask with the name Ahmaud Arbery stenciled on it on Day Five of the 2020 US Open at USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center on Sept. 4, 2020 in Queens, N.Y.Al Bello / Getty Images
It's hard to imagine anything more meaningless than this woman's hair. Why would anyone give a rat's ass?
I will help you-----believe it or not----black people are
OBSESSED with their hair. Whilst you or I might not
waste a single neuronal synapse on the issue, try to
understand that a people obsessed with their hair are
likely to assume that EVERYONE else shares that
obsession
Thanks. I thought that they would be more obsessed with thugs killing each other than their hair, but maybe that's just me.
nope-----I was STRUCK with the lack of response to the prevalence of acute lead poisoning to the head when I faced that issue (decades ago) It was a ho hum issue
in the 'hood'
 

irosie91

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I watched some of the match. It never crossed my mind once that she had "Black Hair". It does puzzle me why many famous Black women like Mary J Blidge have a 'do' that looks like this.

View attachment 387913
What don't you like about it?
I said it puzzles me why a Black woman would do her hair like a White woman. Just the same way it would puzzle me if Taylor Swift put on an Afro wig.
You want segregated hair?
Hair segregation is an exclusively black phenomenon. Well, they wear white hair styles with no issue, but they get mad when white people wear black hair styles. There are tons of cultural appropriation videos, but not a single one involves a black person with blonde hair. Its always some poor white kid with dreads getting shit on for having dreads, or a white celebrity with a wacky hairdo. Poor Adele.

so true-----and IT AIN'T JUST HAIR. Remember when the DASHIKI became a thing? -----it was in the 1960s. It is a nice loose colorful shirt that can be either male or female-----the only reason I did not
get one is because I did not want to experience ANGER from black people
Yeah, black anger and violence is why people dont trust them. Sucky cultures need to learn that there is a price to pay for being sucky.
try to cool it. NOW is not the time
 

Unkotare

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I watched some of the match. It never crossed my mind once that she had "Black Hair". It does puzzle me why many famous Black women like Mary J Blidge have a 'do' that looks like this.

View attachment 387913
What don't you like about it?
I said it puzzles me why a Black woman would do her hair like a White woman. Just the same way it would puzzle me if Taylor Swift put on an Afro wig.
You want segregated hair?
Hair segregation is an exclusively black phenomenon. Well, they wear white hair styles with no issue, but they get mad when white people wear black hair styles. There are tons of cultural appropriation videos, but not a single one involves a black person with blonde hair. Its always some poor white kid with dreads getting shit on for having dreads, or a white celebrity with a wacky hairdo. Poor Adele.

so true-----and IT AIN'T JUST HAIR. Remember when the DASHIKI became a thing? -----it was in the 1960s. It is a nice loose colorful shirt that can be either male or female-----the only reason I did not
get one is because I did not want to experience ANGER from black people
Yeah, black anger and violence is why people dont trust them. Sucky cultures need to learn that there is a price to pay for being sucky.

Careful, that applies to sucky individuals even more.
 

Godboy

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I watched some of the match. It never crossed my mind once that she had "Black Hair". It does puzzle me why many famous Black women like Mary J Blidge have a 'do' that looks like this.

View attachment 387913
What don't you like about it?
I said it puzzles me why a Black woman would do her hair like a White woman. Just the same way it would puzzle me if Taylor Swift put on an Afro wig.
You want segregated hair?
Hair segregation is an exclusively black phenomenon. Well, they wear white hair styles with no issue, but they get mad when white people wear black hair styles. There are tons of cultural appropriation videos, but not a single one involves a black person with blonde hair. Its always some poor white kid with dreads getting shit on for having dreads, or a white celebrity with a wacky hairdo. Poor Adele.

so true-----and IT AIN'T JUST HAIR. Remember when the DASHIKI became a thing? -----it was in the 1960s. It is a nice loose colorful shirt that can be either male or female-----the only reason I did not
get one is because I did not want to experience ANGER from black people
Yeah, black anger and violence is why people dont trust them. Sucky cultures need to learn that there is a price to pay for being sucky.

Careful, that applies to sucky individuals even more.
You ought to know. Everyone thinks you suck.
 

Godboy

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I watched some of the match. It never crossed my mind once that she had "Black Hair". It does puzzle me why many famous Black women like Mary J Blidge have a 'do' that looks like this.

View attachment 387913
What don't you like about it?
I said it puzzles me why a Black woman would do her hair like a White woman. Just the same way it would puzzle me if Taylor Swift put on an Afro wig.
You want segregated hair?
Hair segregation is an exclusively black phenomenon. Well, they wear white hair styles with no issue, but they get mad when white people wear black hair styles. There are tons of cultural appropriation videos, but not a single one involves a black person with blonde hair. Its always some poor white kid with dreads getting shit on for having dreads, or a white celebrity with a wacky hairdo. Poor Adele.

so true-----and IT AIN'T JUST HAIR. Remember when the DASHIKI became a thing? -----it was in the 1960s. It is a nice loose colorful shirt that can be either male or female-----the only reason I did not
get one is because I did not want to experience ANGER from black people
Yeah, black anger and violence is why people dont trust them. Sucky cultures need to learn that there is a price to pay for being sucky.

Careful, that applies to sucky individuals even more.
You ought to know. Everyone thinks you suck.
“Everyone”? You still don’t have the balls to stand up as an individual? Pathetic.
Literally EVERYONE hates you on the USMB. Dont be mad at me for having a reputation that you earned all on your own.
 

Godboy

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I watched some of the match. It never crossed my mind once that she had "Black Hair". It does puzzle me why many famous Black women like Mary J Blidge have a 'do' that looks like this.

View attachment 387913
What don't you like about it?
I said it puzzles me why a Black woman would do her hair like a White woman. Just the same way it would puzzle me if Taylor Swift put on an Afro wig.
You want segregated hair?
Hair segregation is an exclusively black phenomenon. Well, they wear white hair styles with no issue, but they get mad when white people wear black hair styles. There are tons of cultural appropriation videos, but not a single one involves a black person with blonde hair. Its always some poor white kid with dreads getting shit on for having dreads, or a white celebrity with a wacky hairdo. Poor Adele.

so true-----and IT AIN'T JUST HAIR. Remember when the DASHIKI became a thing? -----it was in the 1960s. It is a nice loose colorful shirt that can be either male or female-----the only reason I did not
get one is because I did not want to experience ANGER from black people
Yeah, black anger and violence is why people dont trust them. Sucky cultures need to learn that there is a price to pay for being sucky.

Careful, that applies to sucky individuals even more.
You ought to know. Everyone thinks you suck.
“Everyone”? You still don’t have the balls to stand up as an individual? Pathetic.
Literally EVERYONE hates you on the USMB. ....
That’s it, keep hiding inside a group, you sackless sucker.
Dont be mad. Just stop being the kind of person that EVERYONE hates.
 

Correll

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I'm sure there are people who are unaware that this bias against black hair styles is a "thing". I mentioned it once to some German friends while visiting Germany several decades ago, although I didn't present it as a bias but that wearing my hair straight instead of in natural styles seems to make the white people I worked with more "comfortable".

Naomi Osaka’s hair doesn’t impact her 120 mph serve or powerful baseline play. But it does impact how she is perceived in the bright, white tennis world.

2020 US Open - Day 5
Naomi Osaka of Japan looks on during her Women's Singles third round match against Marta Kostyuk of the Ukraine on Day Five of the 2020 US Open.Al Bello / Getty Images

Sept. 12, 2020, 10:57 AM PDT​
By Robyn Autry, chair of the Sociology Department at Wesleyan University​
Naomi Osaka’s hair doesn’t matter. At least not when it comes to her 120 mph serve, her daunting forehand or her powerful baseline play. But it does matter in terms of how she shows up in the tennis world and how she’s emerged as one of the most prominent athletes supporting the Black Lives Matter protests.
On Saturday, Osaka will play in the U.S. Open women's finals against Victoria Azarenka, who earned her bid by defeating Serena Williams. Both women will be looking to capture a third Grand Slam title.​
Osaka has grabbed headlines this tournament by wearing masks emblazoned with the names of victims of racial violence.​
Alongside her outstanding athleticism, though, Osaka has grabbed headlines this tournament by wearing masks emblazoned with the names of victims of racial violence: Philando Castile, Trayvon Martin, Ahmaud Arbery, George Floyd, Breonna Taylor and Elijah McClain. Black masks, white lettering. Her one-person protest feels even more powerful as she enters and exits the nearly empty stadium every match.​
The masks draw our eyes up, but this is nothing new when it comes to Osaka. With her thick hair often pulled into a high ponytail and up through a visor, Osaka is accustomed to making a statement. It’s the sort of statement that Black bodies always make, whether intended or not, in predominately white spaces. As Claudia Rankine wrote about Serena Williams in “Citizen: An American Lyric” — referencing Zora Neale Hurston — Black players appear against the sharp white backdrop of the tennis world.​
2020 US Open - Day 5
Naomi Osaka of Japan wears a protective face mask with the name Ahmaud Arbery stenciled on it on Day Five of the 2020 US Open at USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center on Sept. 4, 2020 in Queens, N.Y.Al Bello / Getty Images

No one cares about her hair.

Her support of a marxist and racist organization? Yes, we care about that. Fuck her.
 

MarathonMike

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I'm sure there are people who are unaware that this bias against black hair styles is a "thing". I mentioned it once to some German friends while visiting Germany several decades ago, although I didn't present it as a bias but that wearing my hair straight instead of in natural styles seems to make the white people I worked with more "comfortable".

Naomi Osaka’s hair doesn’t impact her 120 mph serve or powerful baseline play. But it does impact how she is perceived in the bright, white tennis world.

2020 US Open - Day 5
Naomi Osaka of Japan looks on during her Women's Singles third round match against Marta Kostyuk of the Ukraine on Day Five of the 2020 US Open.Al Bello / Getty Images

Sept. 12, 2020, 10:57 AM PDT​
By Robyn Autry, chair of the Sociology Department at Wesleyan University​
Naomi Osaka’s hair doesn’t matter. At least not when it comes to her 120 mph serve, her daunting forehand or her powerful baseline play. But it does matter in terms of how she shows up in the tennis world and how she’s emerged as one of the most prominent athletes supporting the Black Lives Matter protests.
On Saturday, Osaka will play in the U.S. Open women's finals against Victoria Azarenka, who earned her bid by defeating Serena Williams. Both women will be looking to capture a third Grand Slam title.​
Osaka has grabbed headlines this tournament by wearing masks emblazoned with the names of victims of racial violence.​
Alongside her outstanding athleticism, though, Osaka has grabbed headlines this tournament by wearing masks emblazoned with the names of victims of racial violence: Philando Castile, Trayvon Martin, Ahmaud Arbery, George Floyd, Breonna Taylor and Elijah McClain. Black masks, white lettering. Her one-person protest feels even more powerful as she enters and exits the nearly empty stadium every match.​
The masks draw our eyes up, but this is nothing new when it comes to Osaka. With her thick hair often pulled into a high ponytail and up through a visor, Osaka is accustomed to making a statement. It’s the sort of statement that Black bodies always make, whether intended or not, in predominately white spaces. As Claudia Rankine wrote about Serena Williams in “Citizen: An American Lyric” — referencing Zora Neale Hurston — Black players appear against the sharp white backdrop of the tennis world.​
2020 US Open - Day 5
Naomi Osaka of Japan wears a protective face mask with the name Ahmaud Arbery stenciled on it on Day Five of the 2020 US Open at USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center on Sept. 4, 2020 in Queens, N.Y.Al Bello / Getty Images
Soooo getting back to your original post in which YOU were bringing up the young lady's "natural" do. Why do Black women so often modify their hair to the point that it is not just straight, but colored to mimic a White woman? You claimed that it makes White people more comfortable, but do you really believe that is why Black women wear White women's hairstyles? To make White people more comfortable with them?
 

Desperado

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I watched some of the match. It never crossed my mind once that she had "Black Hair". It does puzzle me why many famous Black women like Mary J Blidge have a 'do' that looks like this.

View attachment 387913
She claims to hate whites but loves their hairstyles
Blantant Cultural appropriation,
 

Godboy

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I watched some of the match. It never crossed my mind once that she had "Black Hair". It does puzzle me why many famous Black women like Mary J Blidge have a 'do' that looks like this.

View attachment 387913
What don't you like about it?
I said it puzzles me why a Black woman would do her hair like a White woman. Just the same way it would puzzle me if Taylor Swift put on an Afro wig.
You want segregated hair?
Hair segregation is an exclusively black phenomenon. Well, they wear white hair styles with no issue, but they get mad when white people wear black hair styles. There are tons of cultural appropriation videos, but not a single one involves a black person with blonde hair. Its always some poor white kid with dreads getting shit on for having dreads, or a white celebrity with a wacky hairdo. Poor Adele.

so true-----and IT AIN'T JUST HAIR. Remember when the DASHIKI became a thing? -----it was in the 1960s. It is a nice loose colorful shirt that can be either male or female-----the only reason I did not
get one is because I did not want to experience ANGER from black people
Yeah, black anger and violence is why people dont trust them. Sucky cultures need to learn that there is a price to pay for being sucky.

Careful, that applies to sucky individuals even more.
You ought to know. Everyone thinks you suck.
“Everyone”? You still don’t have the balls to stand up as an individual? Pathetic.
Literally EVERYONE hates you on the USMB. ....
That’s it, keep hiding inside a group, you sackless sucker.
Dont be mad. Just stop being the kind of person that EVERYONE hates.
You just don’t have it in you to be a man at all, do you? Pathetic.
Why are you getting angry at me for the reputation that YOU made all by yourself? Now everyone hates you, but that isnt my fault.
 
Last edited:

talksalot

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"Bias against "black hair styles" is a thing most are unaware of.
That's probably true since no one cares about her hair.
Her support for terrorist BLM does makes me take notice in a negative way.
She does not support terrorism and you whites here need to quit lying about what you are unaware of when it comes to race. We have whites here talking shit about black peoples names so you do talk about our hair.
Black Lives Matter is a Marxist, terrorist, anarchist organization that has her support. She can't think BLM is just a slogan.
I got a call this week inviting me to join "Black Women of Power," I'm not black so it was because of my unusual name. Apparently, I was stereotyped.
 

talksalot

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"Bias against "black hair styles" is a thing most are unaware of.
That's probably true since no one cares about her hair.
Her support for terrorist BLM does makes me take notice in a negative way.
Yeah I'm sure she's crying into her pillow as we speak at the thought of you thinking of her in a negative way.

Is there any form of protest white racists find acceptable or can support?
Wow, I hope not.

I wouldn't know.
 

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