What's new
US Message Board - Political Discussion Forum

This is a sample guest message. Register a free account today to become a member! Once signed in, you'll be able to participate on this site by adding your own topics and posts, as well as connect with other members through your own private inbox!

The South American slave trade.

AMart

Diamond Member
Joined
Dec 29, 2020
Messages
2,350
Reaction score
2,410
Points
1,893
In 1619, the Dutch introduced the first captured Africans to America, planting the seeds of a slavery system that evolved into a nightmare of abuse and cruelty that would ultimately divide the nation.
It really was not a nightmare of abuse and cruelty. A black ship on the first ship to Jamestown became a wealthy slave owner himself. Early on especially it was common to free slaves after a number of years. After the cotton gin was when the need for more slaves on larger plantations became the norm. For the first 100 plus years 1/2 to 2/3rds of all Europeans that came to to the were indentured servants.

The Caribbean Sugar plantations slaves had short life spans, nothing like the USA/Colonies. Those were corporate like plantations.

I’m interested in the difference between Latin America and the United States, and what came after the abolitions.
Do you know how many countries you are talking about? Slavery aside there has always been a difference between the Anglosphere and Latin America.

Am I right in saying Jim Crow did not apply to Latin America? No one seems to know.
Something similar to Jim Crow can be recognized in multiple ways,
-You can actually write it down on paper, make it a law and practice it.
-Not write it down but still practice it in various forms.
-Write it down and don't practice it.

There was likely various forms of discrimination all over Latin America, some countries have high mixed race populations, some heavy with natives, some mostly black, some mostly white, some can be regional. Large countries like Brazil and Mexico had lots of emigrates from all over, not just Iberia, and even the The Levant after WWl.
 

surada

Platinum Member
Joined
Jan 3, 2021
Messages
10,026
Reaction score
5,005
Points
893
This is something they definitely won't tell us on the MSM or in the education systems. Thanks for sharing! :)

The local labor pool was decimated by warfare and disease, but they also ran away. The Sugar plantations in Recif, Brazil date to 1500.

The Jewish Community of Recife - Museum of the Jewish ...


Jews arrived in Recife after the year 1500, when the Portuguese landed at what is now Brazil. Recife, capital of the State of Pernambuco in northeastern Brazil, became a prosperous center for sugar production in the 16th and 17th centuries. Part of Recife’s population consisted of New Christians (Jewish converts to Christianity).

Excerpt:

Most Jews of Recife during this period were of Sephardic origin. The society they came to live in was similar to the society they came from in terms of style and language.

The Jews of Recife at this time were active as financiers, brokers, sugar exporters and suppliers of African slaves. Their congregation, Tzur Israel, maintained a synagogue, the religious schools Talmud Torah and Etz Chayim, and a cemetery.

In 1645, the Portuguese, joined by Brazilian sympathizers, started a guerilla war that led to the defeat of the Dutch and the reconquest of northeastern Brazil. It remained under Portuguese rule until the independence of Brazil in 1822. After 1654, the Jewish community disintegrated and those who had openly professed their Judaism now fell victim to the Inquisition. Most of the Recife Jews left Brazil together with the Dutch.

These emigrants developed the sugar industry of the Dutch Antilles. After many difficulties, twenty-three of these emigrants arrived in New Amsterdam, where they founded the first Jewish community of what later became the town of New York.

As of the middle of the 18th century, the Portuguese enabled the New Christians to mingle with the rest of the population, until their traces disappeared as they became completely assimilated.

I realise this is your thing, but I’m not interested in talking about Jews.

Their history is very important in the Transatlantic trade of sugar, rum and guano.

Only to you.

My ancestors were Dutch sea captains and sailors who worked for the Dutch West Indies company in the early 1600s so yes it is important.

It’s not the premise of my OP.

I’m not making it personal.

I didn't accuse you of that.

No

I’m accusing you.

Of what? If you don't like history, don't post about about.. You don't get to sugar coat it.

Irish roots in the Caribbean run deep | IrishCentral.com


May 19, 2017 · “In 1629 a large group of Irish men and women were sent to Guiana, and by 1632, Irish were the main slaves sold to Antigua and Montserrat in the West Indies. By 1637 a …

Excerpt:

Krystal D’Costa of Scientific American writes that after the Battle of Kinsale, the Irish clan system was abolished and around 30,000 prisoners of war were shipped off and sold as laborers to the colonies of the Caribbean and United States.

“The first Irish slaves were sold to a settlement on the Amazon River In South America in 1612. It would probably be more accurate to say that the first “recorded” sale of Irish slaves was in 1612, because the English, who were noted for their meticulous record-keeping, simply did not keep track of things Irish, whether it be goods or people, unless such was being shipped to England.”

This would become a common practice after the Proclamation of 1625.

“In 1629 a large group of Irish men and women were sent to Guiana, and by 1632, Irish were the main slaves sold to Antigua and Montserrat in the West Indies. By 1637 a census showed that 69% of the total population of Montserrat were Irish slaves, which records show was a cause of concern to the English planters.”

I don’t mean to be rude, but I shan’t be responding to you again.

Your trademark is all over USMB, and it’s not honest.


That's fine.. doesn't change the documents in the archives.
 
OP
Mindful

Mindful

Diamond Member
Joined
Sep 5, 2014
Messages
42,594
Reaction score
16,166
Points
2,320
Location
Here, there, and everywhere.
In 1619, the Dutch introduced the first captured Africans to America, planting the seeds of a slavery system that evolved into a nightmare of abuse and cruelty that would ultimately divide the nation.
It really was not a nightmare of abuse and cruelty. A black ship on the first ship to Jamestown became a wealthy slave owner himself. Early on especially it was common to free slaves after a number of years. After the cotton gin was when the need for more slaves on larger plantations became the norm. For the first 100 plus years 1/2 to 2/3rds of all Europeans that came to to the were indentured servants.

The Caribbean Sugar plantations slaves had short life spans, nothing like the USA/Colonies. Those were corporate like plantations.

I’m interested in the difference between Latin America and the United States, and what came after the abolitions.
Do you know how many countries you are talking about? Slavery aside there has always been a difference between the Anglosphere and Latin America.

Am I right in saying Jim Crow did not apply to Latin America? No one seems to know.
Something similar to Jim Crow can be recognized in multiple ways,
-You can actually write it down on paper, make it a law and practice it.
-Not write it down but still practice it in various forms.
-Write it down and don't practice it.

There was likely various forms of discrimination all over Latin America, some countries have high mixed race populations, some heavy with natives, some mostly black, some mostly white, some can be regional. Large countries like Brazil and Mexico had lots of emigrates from all over, not Iberia, and even the The Levant after WWl.

Discrimination is one thing. Separation another.
 

surada

Platinum Member
Joined
Jan 3, 2021
Messages
10,026
Reaction score
5,005
Points
893
which is why you see hardly any blacks in the ME despite thousands of years of an active slave trade.

I’ve seen lots of white Arabs in Nazareth. Blondes with blue eyes. Some even red haired , with freckles.

Descendants of white slaves, and the Crusaders. (Not the group)

Ben Gurion said they were descended from Jewish farmers. DNA studies bear that out with 90% being descended from Jews.
 

surada

Platinum Member
Joined
Jan 3, 2021
Messages
10,026
Reaction score
5,005
Points
893
In 1619, the Dutch introduced the first captured Africans to America, planting the seeds of a slavery system that evolved into a nightmare of abuse and cruelty that would ultimately divide the nation.
It really was not a nightmare of abuse and cruelty. A black ship on the first ship to Jamestown became a wealthy slave owner himself. Early on especially it was common to free slaves after a number of years. After the cotton gin was when the need for more slaves on larger plantations became the norm. For the first 100 plus years 1/2 to 2/3rds of all Europeans that came to to the were indentured servants.

The Caribbean Sugar plantations slaves had short life spans, nothing like the USA/Colonies. Those were corporate like plantations.

I’m interested in the difference between Latin America and the United States, and what came after the abolitions.
Do you know how many countries you are talking about? Slavery aside there has always been a difference between the Anglosphere and Latin America.

Am I right in saying Jim Crow did not apply to Latin America? No one seems to know.
Something similar to Jim Crow can be recognized in multiple ways,
-You can actually write it down on paper, make it a law and practice it.
-Not write it down but still practice it in various forms.
-Write it down and don't practice it.

There was likely various forms of discrimination all over Latin America, some countries have high mixed race populations, some heavy with natives, some mostly black, some mostly white, some can be regional. Large countries like Brazil and Mexico had lots of emigrates from all over, not just Iberia, and even the The Levant after WWl.


Palestinians in Latin America: Between Assimilation and ...
Latin America is host to an estimated half-million people of Palestinian descent, the largest such population outside the Arab world. Migration to the region began in the late 1800s and peaked between 1900 and 1930, with surges around periods of war or economic crisis in Palestine.
 

AMart

Diamond Member
Joined
Dec 29, 2020
Messages
2,350
Reaction score
2,410
Points
1,893
In 1619, the Dutch introduced the first captured Africans to America, planting the seeds of a slavery system that evolved into a nightmare of abuse and cruelty that would ultimately divide the nation.
It really was not a nightmare of abuse and cruelty. A black ship on the first ship to Jamestown became a wealthy slave owner himself. Early on especially it was common to free slaves after a number of years. After the cotton gin was when the need for more slaves on larger plantations became the norm. For the first 100 plus years 1/2 to 2/3rds of all Europeans that came to to the were indentured servants.

The Caribbean Sugar plantations slaves had short life spans, nothing like the USA/Colonies. Those were corporate like plantations.

I’m interested in the difference between Latin America and the United States, and what came after the abolitions.
Do you know how many countries you are talking about? Slavery aside there has always been a difference between the Anglosphere and Latin America.

Am I right in saying Jim Crow did not apply to Latin America? No one seems to know.
Something similar to Jim Crow can be recognized in multiple ways,
-You can actually write it down on paper, make it a law and practice it.
-Not write it down but still practice it in various forms.
-Write it down and don't practice it.

There was likely various forms of discrimination all over Latin America, some countries have high mixed race populations, some heavy with natives, some mostly black, some mostly white, some can be regional. Large countries like Brazil and Mexico had lots of emigrates from all over, not Iberia, and even the The Levant after WWl.

Discrimination is one thing. Separation another.
The idea that people from all over the world, of any and all colors, just magically exist of the same piece of real estate without self clan separation or state sponsored is a fallacy. It is usually generations later that the surname, ethnicity, country of origin, religion is not as important.
In the USA Protestant vs. Catholic was every bit as big of a continental divide than race.
 

JoeMoma

Platinum Member
Joined
Nov 22, 2014
Messages
18,000
Reaction score
5,682
Points
360
In 1619, the Dutch introduced the first captured Africans to America, planting the seeds of a slavery system that evolved into a nightmare of abuse and cruelty that would ultimately divide the nation.
It really was not a nightmare of abuse and cruelty. A black ship on the first ship to Jamestown became a wealthy slave owner himself. Early on especially it was common to free slaves after a number of years. After the cotton gin was when the need for more slaves on larger plantations became the norm. For the first 100 plus years 1/2 to 2/3rds of all Europeans that came to to the were indentured servants.

The Caribbean Sugar plantations slaves had short life spans, nothing like the USA/Colonies. Those were corporate like plantations.

I’m interested in the difference between Latin America and the United States, and what came after the abolitions.
Do you know how many countries you are talking about? Slavery aside there has always been a difference between the Anglosphere and Latin America.

Am I right in saying Jim Crow did not apply to Latin America? No one seems to know.
By definition, Jim Crow Laws applied to the southern states in The United States. Did other countries had laws that were similar to Jim Crow Laws? I do not know.

 

JoeMoma

Platinum Member
Joined
Nov 22, 2014
Messages
18,000
Reaction score
5,682
Points
360
The origins of slavery are lost to human memory. It is sometimes hypothesized that at some moment it was decided that persons detained for a crime or as a result of warfarewould be more useful if put to work in some way rather than if killed outright and discarded or eaten. But both if and when that first occurred is unknown.

Britannica.com
Probably happened when a big strong caveman or cave woman captured a smaller, weaker caveman or cave woman and made him work.
 
OP
Mindful

Mindful

Diamond Member
Joined
Sep 5, 2014
Messages
42,594
Reaction score
16,166
Points
2,320
Location
Here, there, and everywhere.
In 1619, the Dutch introduced the first captured Africans to America, planting the seeds of a slavery system that evolved into a nightmare of abuse and cruelty that would ultimately divide the nation.
It really was not a nightmare of abuse and cruelty. A black ship on the first ship to Jamestown became a wealthy slave owner himself. Early on especially it was common to free slaves after a number of years. After the cotton gin was when the need for more slaves on larger plantations became the norm. For the first 100 plus years 1/2 to 2/3rds of all Europeans that came to to the were indentured servants.

The Caribbean Sugar plantations slaves had short life spans, nothing like the USA/Colonies. Those were corporate like plantations.

I’m interested in the difference between Latin America and the United States, and what came after the abolitions.
Do you know how many countries you are talking about? Slavery aside there has always been a difference between the Anglosphere and Latin America.

Am I right in saying Jim Crow did not apply to Latin America? No one seems to know.
By definition, Jim Crow Laws applied to the southern states in The United States. Did other countries had laws that were similar to Jim Crow Laws? I do not know.


I already mentioned: South Africa.
 

JoeMoma

Platinum Member
Joined
Nov 22, 2014
Messages
18,000
Reaction score
5,682
Points
360
In 1619, the Dutch introduced the first captured Africans to America, planting the seeds of a slavery system that evolved into a nightmare of abuse and cruelty that would ultimately divide the nation.
It really was not a nightmare of abuse and cruelty. A black ship on the first ship to Jamestown became a wealthy slave owner himself. Early on especially it was common to free slaves after a number of years. After the cotton gin was when the need for more slaves on larger plantations became the norm. For the first 100 plus years 1/2 to 2/3rds of all Europeans that came to to the were indentured servants.

The Caribbean Sugar plantations slaves had short life spans, nothing like the USA/Colonies. Those were corporate like plantations.

I’m interested in the difference between Latin America and the United States, and what came after the abolitions.
Do you know how many countries you are talking about? Slavery aside there has always been a difference between the Anglosphere and Latin America.

Am I right in saying Jim Crow did not apply to Latin America? No one seems to know.
By definition, Jim Crow Laws applied to the southern states in The United States. Did other countries had laws that were similar to Jim Crow Laws? I do not know.


I already mentioned: South Africa.
Yep... Apartheid. I agree, that's similar to Jim Crow.
 

Oz and the Orchestra

Platinum Member
Joined
May 25, 2020
Messages
2,412
Reaction score
1,227
Points
918
Location
Lake District England
The slave trade in Latin & South America was far bigger than in the US but you wouldn't know because separatist policies weren't put into place after it ended as they were in the US. All parties assimilated naturally and over the decades became equals.
 

Sunni Man

Diamond Member
Joined
Aug 14, 2008
Messages
56,575
Reaction score
18,295
Points
2,280
Location
Patriotic American Muslim
In 1619, the Dutch introduced the first captured Africans to America, planting the seeds of a slavery system that evolved into a nightmare of abuse and cruelty that would ultimately divide the nation.
Although not taught in school, it was the Dutch Jews who started and ran the African slave trade in both North and South America. .... :cool:
 
OP
Mindful

Mindful

Diamond Member
Joined
Sep 5, 2014
Messages
42,594
Reaction score
16,166
Points
2,320
Location
Here, there, and everywhere.
In 1619, the Dutch introduced the first captured Africans to America, planting the seeds of a slavery system that evolved into a nightmare of abuse and cruelty that would ultimately divide the nation.
Although not taught in school, it was the Dutch Jews who started and ran the African slave trade in both North and South America. .... :cool:

You again?

Not interested.
 

AMart

Diamond Member
Joined
Dec 29, 2020
Messages
2,350
Reaction score
2,410
Points
1,893
In 1619, the Dutch introduced the first captured Africans to America, planting the seeds of a slavery system that evolved into a nightmare of abuse and cruelty that would ultimately divide the nation.
Although not taught in school, it was the Dutch Jews who started and ran the African slave trade in both North and South America. .... :cool:
Portuguese Jews financed the first W. African expedition and built the first sugar plantations off of the coast of W. Africa. An Island they named Sao Tome around 1470.
 

AMart

Diamond Member
Joined
Dec 29, 2020
Messages
2,350
Reaction score
2,410
Points
1,893
Which brings me to my next question:

Do Latin Americans feel guilty about the crimes of their Spanish ancestors?
Latin America is was not just Spanish. My guess is that the disease of Cultural Marxism is not nearly as institutional as in the Anglosphere. However Economic Socialism bled through many countries down there, and still runs Cuba, Venezuela, Nicaragua etc.
 

USMB Server Goals

Total amount
$350.00
Goal
$350.00

Most reactions - Past 7 days

Forum List

Top