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The South American slave trade.

Mindful

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Histories of the Trans-Atlantic Slave Trade typically focus on those enslaved in the North American colonies and often overlook its Southern counterpart. However, those enslaved in North America during the colonial period were a minority; only 6% of Africans were taken to the East Coast of North America between 1500 and 1870.

Slave imports from Africa were overwhelmingly taken to South America and the Caribbean. Although the Southern United States is renowned for its past brutality towards the slave population, those enslaved in areas such as Brazil, Colombia and Bolivia experienced a much harsher reality.

 
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^ Yet, not unlike North America, slavery existed in South America even before African slave importation transformed the region’s landscape. After Christopher Columbus’s discovery of the Americas in 1492, much of South America was divided between the Spanish and the Portuguese with the Treaty of Tordesillas in 1494. When the Europeans arrived in South America, they enslaved the native inhabitants and used them as a free labour force to work on their mines and the cotton, sugar, coffee and tobacco plantations that were being developed. Moreover, shortly after the European colonisation, natives of these regions rapidly decreased in number.

The Europeans that came to America brought with them diseases that the natives were unaccustomed to, which has been described by some as the ‘Columbian Exchange’. Diseases such as measles, influenza, mumps, typhus and small pox were detrimental to the Indian inhabitants of South America.
 

Thoth001

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This is something they definitely won't tell us on the MSM or in the education systems. Thanks for sharing! :)
 
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Which led me on to wondering if they had Jim Crow laws in South America.

The only country I know of outside the United States is(was) South Africa.
 
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In 1619, the Dutch introduced the first captured Africans to America, planting the seeds of a slavery system that evolved into a nightmare of abuse and cruelty that would ultimately divide the nation.
 

Thoth001

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Which led me on to wondering if they had Jim Crow laws in South America.

The only country I know of outside the United States is(was) South Africa.

I just did a quick Duckduckgo search on Jim Crow laws in South America and the only thing that comes up is North and South for the US. I don't know much about this myself. As far as I know and I could be wrong, is that Jim Crow laws are only an American thing. It is definitely something interesting to find more out about though.
 

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In 1619, the Dutch introduced the first captured Africans to America, planting the seeds of a slavery system that evolved into a nightmare of abuse and cruelty that would ultimately divide the nation.

I know off the top of my head when I researched this a bit a few months ago, that the slave trade had a lot to do with Portugal also.
 

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This is something they definitely won't tell us on the MSM or in the education systems. Thanks for sharing! :)

The local labor pool was decimated by warfare and disease, but they also ran away. The Sugar plantations in Recif, Brazil date to 1500.

The Jewish Community of Recife - Museum of the Jewish ...


Jews arrived in Recife after the year 1500, when the Portuguese landed at what is now Brazil. Recife, capital of the State of Pernambuco in northeastern Brazil, became a prosperous center for sugar production in the 16th and 17th centuries. Part of Recife’s population consisted of New Christians (Jewish converts to Christianity).

Excerpt:

Most Jews of Recife during this period were of Sephardic origin. The society they came to live in was similar to the society they came from in terms of style and language.

The Jews of Recife at this time were active as financiers, brokers, sugar exporters and suppliers of African slaves. Their congregation, Tzur Israel, maintained a synagogue, the religious schools Talmud Torah and Etz Chayim, and a cemetery.

In 1645, the Portuguese, joined by Brazilian sympathizers, started a guerilla war that led to the defeat of the Dutch and the reconquest of northeastern Brazil. It remained under Portuguese rule until the independence of Brazil in 1822. After 1654, the Jewish community disintegrated and those who had openly professed their Judaism now fell victim to the Inquisition. Most of the Recife Jews left Brazil together with the Dutch.

These emigrants developed the sugar industry of the Dutch Antilles. After many difficulties, twenty-three of these emigrants arrived in New Amsterdam, where they founded the first Jewish community of what later became the town of New York.

As of the middle of the 18th century, the Portuguese enabled the New Christians to mingle with the rest of the population, until their traces disappeared as they became completely assimilated.
 

surada

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In 1619, the Dutch introduced the first captured Africans to America, planting the seeds of a slavery system that evolved into a nightmare of abuse and cruelty that would ultimately divide the nation.

I know off the top of my head when I researched this a bit a few months ago, that the slave trade had a lot to do with Portugal also.

Much earlier in Brazil.. 1500 .. The sugar planters had been expelled from Spain nd Portugal by way of Amsterdam. The archives in Holland and Recif have detailed records.
 
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This is something they definitely won't tell us on the MSM or in the education systems. Thanks for sharing! :)

The local labor pool was decimated by warfare and disease, but they also ran away. The Sugar plantations in Recif, Brazil date to 1500.

The Jewish Community of Recife - Museum of the Jewish ...


Jews arrived in Recife after the year 1500, when the Portuguese landed at what is now Brazil. Recife, capital of the State of Pernambuco in northeastern Brazil, became a prosperous center for sugar production in the 16th and 17th centuries. Part of Recife’s population consisted of New Christians (Jewish converts to Christianity).

Excerpt:

Most Jews of Recife during this period were of Sephardic origin. The society they came to live in was similar to the society they came from in terms of style and language.

The Jews of Recife at this time were active as financiers, brokers, sugar exporters and suppliers of African slaves. Their congregation, Tzur Israel, maintained a synagogue, the religious schools Talmud Torah and Etz Chayim, and a cemetery.

In 1645, the Portuguese, joined by Brazilian sympathizers, started a guerilla war that led to the defeat of the Dutch and the reconquest of northeastern Brazil. It remained under Portuguese rule until the independence of Brazil in 1822. After 1654, the Jewish community disintegrated and those who had openly professed their Judaism now fell victim to the Inquisition. Most of the Recife Jews left Brazil together with the Dutch.

These emigrants developed the sugar industry of the Dutch Antilles. After many difficulties, twenty-three of these emigrants arrived in New Amsterdam, where they founded the first Jewish community of what later became the town of New York.

As of the middle of the 18th century, the Portuguese enabled the New Christians to mingle with the rest of the population, until their traces disappeared as they became completely assimilated.

I realise this is your thing, but I’m not interested in talking about Jews.
 

Thoth001

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This is something they definitely won't tell us on the MSM or in the education systems. Thanks for sharing! :)

The local labor pool was decimated by warfare and disease, but they also ran away. The Sugar plantations in Recif, Brazil date to 1500.

The Jewish Community of Recife - Museum of the Jewish ...


Jews arrived in Recife after the year 1500, when the Portuguese landed at what is now Brazil. Recife, capital of the State of Pernambuco in northeastern Brazil, became a prosperous center for sugar production in the 16th and 17th centuries. Part of Recife’s population consisted of New Christians (Jewish converts to Christianity).

Excerpt:

Most Jews of Recife during this period were of Sephardic origin. The society they came to live in was similar to the society they came from in terms of style and language.

The Jews of Recife at this time were active as financiers, brokers, sugar exporters and suppliers of African slaves. Their congregation, Tzur Israel, maintained a synagogue, the religious schools Talmud Torah and Etz Chayim, and a cemetery.

In 1645, the Portuguese, joined by Brazilian sympathizers, started a guerilla war that led to the defeat of the Dutch and the reconquest of northeastern Brazil. It remained under Portuguese rule until the independence of Brazil in 1822. After 1654, the Jewish community disintegrated and those who had openly professed their Judaism now fell victim to the Inquisition. Most of the Recife Jews left Brazil together with the Dutch.

These emigrants developed the sugar industry of the Dutch Antilles. After many difficulties, twenty-three of these emigrants arrived in New Amsterdam, where they founded the first Jewish community of what later became the town of New York.

As of the middle of the 18th century, the Portuguese enabled the New Christians to mingle with the rest of the population, until their traces disappeared as they became completely assimilated.

I thought the Jews were a big part in creating the slave trade. I recently seen some articles on that. But like OP said, I don't think she is interested in the Jewish slave trade. Although that is another rabbit hole to go down.
 

surada

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This is something they definitely won't tell us on the MSM or in the education systems. Thanks for sharing! :)

The local labor pool was decimated by warfare and disease, but they also ran away. The Sugar plantations in Recif, Brazil date to 1500.

The Jewish Community of Recife - Museum of the Jewish ...


Jews arrived in Recife after the year 1500, when the Portuguese landed at what is now Brazil. Recife, capital of the State of Pernambuco in northeastern Brazil, became a prosperous center for sugar production in the 16th and 17th centuries. Part of Recife’s population consisted of New Christians (Jewish converts to Christianity).

Excerpt:

Most Jews of Recife during this period were of Sephardic origin. The society they came to live in was similar to the society they came from in terms of style and language.

The Jews of Recife at this time were active as financiers, brokers, sugar exporters and suppliers of African slaves. Their congregation, Tzur Israel, maintained a synagogue, the religious schools Talmud Torah and Etz Chayim, and a cemetery.

In 1645, the Portuguese, joined by Brazilian sympathizers, started a guerilla war that led to the defeat of the Dutch and the reconquest of northeastern Brazil. It remained under Portuguese rule until the independence of Brazil in 1822. After 1654, the Jewish community disintegrated and those who had openly professed their Judaism now fell victim to the Inquisition. Most of the Recife Jews left Brazil together with the Dutch.

These emigrants developed the sugar industry of the Dutch Antilles. After many difficulties, twenty-three of these emigrants arrived in New Amsterdam, where they founded the first Jewish community of what later became the town of New York.

As of the middle of the 18th century, the Portuguese enabled the New Christians to mingle with the rest of the population, until their traces disappeared as they became completely assimilated.

I realise this is your thing, but I’m not interested in talking about Jews.

Their history is very important in the Transatlantic trade of sugar, rum and guano.
 
OP
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This is something they definitely won't tell us on the MSM or in the education systems. Thanks for sharing! :)

The local labor pool was decimated by warfare and disease, but they also ran away. The Sugar plantations in Recif, Brazil date to 1500.

The Jewish Community of Recife - Museum of the Jewish ...


Jews arrived in Recife after the year 1500, when the Portuguese landed at what is now Brazil. Recife, capital of the State of Pernambuco in northeastern Brazil, became a prosperous center for sugar production in the 16th and 17th centuries. Part of Recife’s population consisted of New Christians (Jewish converts to Christianity).

Excerpt:

Most Jews of Recife during this period were of Sephardic origin. The society they came to live in was similar to the society they came from in terms of style and language.

The Jews of Recife at this time were active as financiers, brokers, sugar exporters and suppliers of African slaves. Their congregation, Tzur Israel, maintained a synagogue, the religious schools Talmud Torah and Etz Chayim, and a cemetery.

In 1645, the Portuguese, joined by Brazilian sympathizers, started a guerilla war that led to the defeat of the Dutch and the reconquest of northeastern Brazil. It remained under Portuguese rule until the independence of Brazil in 1822. After 1654, the Jewish community disintegrated and those who had openly professed their Judaism now fell victim to the Inquisition. Most of the Recife Jews left Brazil together with the Dutch.

These emigrants developed the sugar industry of the Dutch Antilles. After many difficulties, twenty-three of these emigrants arrived in New Amsterdam, where they founded the first Jewish community of what later became the town of New York.

As of the middle of the 18th century, the Portuguese enabled the New Christians to mingle with the rest of the population, until their traces disappeared as they became completely assimilated.

I realise this is your thing, but I’m not interested in talking about Jews.

Their history is very important in the Transatlantic trade of sugar, rum and guano.

Only to you.
 

Thoth001

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This is something they definitely won't tell us on the MSM or in the education systems. Thanks for sharing! :)

The local labor pool was decimated by warfare and disease, but they also ran away. The Sugar plantations in Recif, Brazil date to 1500.

The Jewish Community of Recife - Museum of the Jewish ...


Jews arrived in Recife after the year 1500, when the Portuguese landed at what is now Brazil. Recife, capital of the State of Pernambuco in northeastern Brazil, became a prosperous center for sugar production in the 16th and 17th centuries. Part of Recife’s population consisted of New Christians (Jewish converts to Christianity).

Excerpt:

Most Jews of Recife during this period were of Sephardic origin. The society they came to live in was similar to the society they came from in terms of style and language.

The Jews of Recife at this time were active as financiers, brokers, sugar exporters and suppliers of African slaves. Their congregation, Tzur Israel, maintained a synagogue, the religious schools Talmud Torah and Etz Chayim, and a cemetery.

In 1645, the Portuguese, joined by Brazilian sympathizers, started a guerilla war that led to the defeat of the Dutch and the reconquest of northeastern Brazil. It remained under Portuguese rule until the independence of Brazil in 1822. After 1654, the Jewish community disintegrated and those who had openly professed their Judaism now fell victim to the Inquisition. Most of the Recife Jews left Brazil together with the Dutch.

These emigrants developed the sugar industry of the Dutch Antilles. After many difficulties, twenty-three of these emigrants arrived in New Amsterdam, where they founded the first Jewish community of what later became the town of New York.

As of the middle of the 18th century, the Portuguese enabled the New Christians to mingle with the rest of the population, until their traces disappeared as they became completely assimilated.

I realise this is your thing, but I’m not interested in talking about Jews.

Their history is very important in the Transatlantic trade of sugar, rum and guano.

I do agree.
 

surada

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This is something they definitely won't tell us on the MSM or in the education systems. Thanks for sharing! :)

The local labor pool was decimated by warfare and disease, but they also ran away. The Sugar plantations in Recif, Brazil date to 1500.

The Jewish Community of Recife - Museum of the Jewish ...


Jews arrived in Recife after the year 1500, when the Portuguese landed at what is now Brazil. Recife, capital of the State of Pernambuco in northeastern Brazil, became a prosperous center for sugar production in the 16th and 17th centuries. Part of Recife’s population consisted of New Christians (Jewish converts to Christianity).

Excerpt:

Most Jews of Recife during this period were of Sephardic origin. The society they came to live in was similar to the society they came from in terms of style and language.

The Jews of Recife at this time were active as financiers, brokers, sugar exporters and suppliers of African slaves. Their congregation, Tzur Israel, maintained a synagogue, the religious schools Talmud Torah and Etz Chayim, and a cemetery.

In 1645, the Portuguese, joined by Brazilian sympathizers, started a guerilla war that led to the defeat of the Dutch and the reconquest of northeastern Brazil. It remained under Portuguese rule until the independence of Brazil in 1822. After 1654, the Jewish community disintegrated and those who had openly professed their Judaism now fell victim to the Inquisition. Most of the Recife Jews left Brazil together with the Dutch.

These emigrants developed the sugar industry of the Dutch Antilles. After many difficulties, twenty-three of these emigrants arrived in New Amsterdam, where they founded the first Jewish community of what later became the town of New York.

As of the middle of the 18th century, the Portuguese enabled the New Christians to mingle with the rest of the population, until their traces disappeared as they became completely assimilated.

I realise this is your thing, but I’m not interested in talking about Jews.

Their history is very important in the Transatlantic trade of sugar, rum and guano.

Only to you.

My ancestors were Dutch sea captains and sailors who worked for the Dutch West Indies company in the early 1600s so yes it is important.
 

BULLDOG

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Our part in slavery was wrong. What any other country did doesn't change that.
 

surada

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Our part in slavery was wrong. What any other country did doesn't change that.

Christians wrapped slavery up in notions about Ham in the Old Testament. That seems to be the prevailing justification for slavery.
 

BULLDOG

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Our part in slavery was wrong. What any other country did doesn't change that.

Christians wrapped slavery up in notions about Ham in the Old Testament. That seems to be the prevailing justification for slavery.
Odd, but the OP seems to think other country's slavery justifies our slavery.
 
OP
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This is something they definitely won't tell us on the MSM or in the education systems. Thanks for sharing! :)

The local labor pool was decimated by warfare and disease, but they also ran away. The Sugar plantations in Recif, Brazil date to 1500.

The Jewish Community of Recife - Museum of the Jewish ...


Jews arrived in Recife after the year 1500, when the Portuguese landed at what is now Brazil. Recife, capital of the State of Pernambuco in northeastern Brazil, became a prosperous center for sugar production in the 16th and 17th centuries. Part of Recife’s population consisted of New Christians (Jewish converts to Christianity).

Excerpt:

Most Jews of Recife during this period were of Sephardic origin. The society they came to live in was similar to the society they came from in terms of style and language.

The Jews of Recife at this time were active as financiers, brokers, sugar exporters and suppliers of African slaves. Their congregation, Tzur Israel, maintained a synagogue, the religious schools Talmud Torah and Etz Chayim, and a cemetery.

In 1645, the Portuguese, joined by Brazilian sympathizers, started a guerilla war that led to the defeat of the Dutch and the reconquest of northeastern Brazil. It remained under Portuguese rule until the independence of Brazil in 1822. After 1654, the Jewish community disintegrated and those who had openly professed their Judaism now fell victim to the Inquisition. Most of the Recife Jews left Brazil together with the Dutch.

These emigrants developed the sugar industry of the Dutch Antilles. After many difficulties, twenty-three of these emigrants arrived in New Amsterdam, where they founded the first Jewish community of what later became the town of New York.

As of the middle of the 18th century, the Portuguese enabled the New Christians to mingle with the rest of the population, until their traces disappeared as they became completely assimilated.

I realise this is your thing, but I’m not interested in talking about Jews.

Their history is very important in the Transatlantic trade of sugar, rum and guano.

Only to you.

My ancestors were Dutch sea captains and sailors who worked for the Dutch West Indies company in the early 1600s so yes it is important.

It’s not the premise of my OP.

I’m not making it personal.
 

surada

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Our part in slavery was wrong. What any other country did doesn't change that.

Christians wrapped slavery up in notions about Ham in the Old Testament. That seems to be the prevailing justification for slavery.
Odd, but the OP seems to think other country's slavery justifies our slavery.

In the context of the times slavery was sort of an economic engine for everything from sugar to rice, tobacco, indigo, phosphates and cotton. Doesn't make it right, just profitable.
 

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