The Most Fiscally Unsound States in the US

Publius1787

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The Most Fiscally Unsound States in the US

Before Checking out which states are the most fiscally unsound (HERE) I encourage you to study these maps.

2012 election



The worst states are

New Jersey
Connecticut
Illinois
Massachusetts
California
New York
Maryland
Hawaii
Pennsylvania
West Virginia

The most fiscally sound states are

Alaska
South Dakota
North Dakota
Nebraska
Wyoming
Florida
Ohio
Tennessee
Montana
Alabama


See a trend?
 
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itfitzme

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Interesting;

Measurement methods depended on data availability, researcher’s preferences, and the unit of analysis. As a result, despite 30 years of research at the local level and nearly as many at the state level, there is no single accepted measure of fiscal condition (Jimenez 2009).
This analysis also demonstrates the difficulty and inherent subjectivity of assessing and ranking state fiscal conditions. Finding the correct mix of indicators to measure each aspect of solvency is more art than science, which is why this analysis relies on prior research to guide the construction of each solvency index.
I applied the following weights to construct the comprehensive fiscal condition index: (0.35 × cash solvency) + (0.35 × budget solvency) + (0.2 × long-run solvency) + (0.1 × service-level solvency).12 Because of the difficulty in objectively measuring service-level solvency and its imprecision due to future unknowns, it has the lowest weight of the four solvency indices.
 
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Publius1787

Publius1787

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Interesting;

Measurement methods depended on data availability, researcher’s preferences, and the unit of analysis. As a result, despite 30 years of research at the local level and nearly as many at the state level, there is no single accepted measure of fiscal condition (Jimenez 2009).
This analysis also demonstrates the difficulty and inherent subjectivity of assessing and ranking state fiscal conditions. Finding the correct mix of indicators to measure each aspect of solvency is more art than science, which is why this analysis relies on prior research to guide the construction of each solvency index.
I applied the following weights to construct the comprehensive fiscal condition index: (0.35 × cash solvency) + (0.35 × budget solvency) + (0.2 × long-run solvency) + (0.1 × service-level solvency).12 Because of the difficulty in objectively measuring service-level solvency and its imprecision due to future unknowns, it has the lowest weight of the four solvency indices.
Very well. I get it. you are insulted that the study found blue states as fiscally unsound. Excellent! Now will you be so kind as to find another study that disagrees with this one? They come out every so often and the worst states rarely change.
 

itfitzme

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Interesting;

Measurement methods depended on data availability, researcher’s preferences, and the unit of analysis. As a result, despite 30 years of research at the local level and nearly as many at the state level, there is no single accepted measure of fiscal condition (Jimenez 2009).
I applied the following weights to construct the comprehensive fiscal condition index: (0.35 × cash solvency) + (0.35 × budget solvency) + (0.2 × long-run solvency) + (0.1 × service-level solvency).12 Because of the difficulty in objectively measuring service-level solvency and its imprecision due to future unknowns, it has the lowest weight of the four solvency indices.
Very well. I get it. you are insulted that the study found blue states as fiscally unsound. Excellent! Now will you be so kind as to find another study that disagrees with this one? They come out every so often and the worst states rarely change.
What are you talking about? I'm just reading the measurements of the study so I understand them.

The very first sentence in the abstract says;

State fiscal condition is multifaceted and difficult to measure.
The second sentence of the abstract is

I create the cash, budget, long-run, and service-level solvency indices using
fiscal year 2012 data to measure the dimensions of fiscal condition.
That is pretty much what I picked up reading the study for a better understanding. She's got, "cash solvency", "budget solvency", "long-run solvency" and "service-level solvency" as her basic measures.

Three indicators comprise the cash solvency index: the cash, quick, and current ratios.
Two financial indicators make up the budget solvency index: operating ratio and the surplus (or deficit) per capita.
Three indicators measure long-run solvency: net asset ratio, longterm liability ratio, and long-term liabilities per capita.
Three measures also compose the service-level solvency index: tax per capita, revenue per capita, and expense per capita

I'm not close to deciding if I like them or not.

Nowhere have I said shit about what states are what. I suspect that you are simply projecting.
 
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Listening

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It would be great if there were a common set of metrics. That way the citizens would KNOW (imagine that) !
 
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Publius1787

Publius1787

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Interesting;
Very well. I get it. you are insulted that the study found blue states as fiscally unsound. Excellent! Now will you be so kind as to find another study that disagrees with this one? They come out every so often and the worst states rarely change.
What are you talking about? I'm just reading the measurements of the study so I understand them.

The very first sentence in the abstract says;



The second sentence of the abstract is

I create the cash, budget, long-run, and service-level solvency indices using
fiscal year 2012 data to measure the dimensions of fiscal condition.
That is pretty much what I picked up reading the study for a better understanding. She's got, "cash solvency", "budget solvency", "long-run solvency" and "service-level solvency" as her basic measures.

Three indicators comprise the cash solvency index: the cash, quick, and current ratios.
Two financial indicators make up the budget solvency index: operating ratio and the surplus (or deficit) per capita.
Three indicators measure long-run solvency: net asset ratio, longterm liability ratio, and long-term liabilities per capita.
Three measures also compose the service-level solvency index: tax per capita, revenue per capita, and expense per capita

I'm not close to deciding if I like them or not.

Nowhere have I said shit about what states are what. I suspect that you are simply projecting.
An assessment based upon what you posted and an accurate one at that. You did not post them so as to study them. You could have done that on your own. No, you want to challenge the findings. Why post the above at all if your not challenging the findings? You wanted to add to the op? I don't think so.
 

Listening

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It would be great if there were a common set of metrics. That way the citizens would KNOW (imagine that) !
That would be nice.

The study combines ten seperate measures together in an attempt to get there.
They are doing the best they can with what they've got.

Governments, for some reason, go to some length, to avoid accountability.

In my state, they can't all the school systems to have a common accounting system (a common set of accounts with an agreed upon defintion). That way....we could grade them. They don't like that. Imagine......:eek:
 

OnePercenter

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The Mercatus Center at George Mason University released the study earlier this week. The center counts among its key backers the Koch family, and conservative financier Charles Koch sits on the center's board.
More faux news?
 
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Publius1787

Publius1787

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The Mercatus Center at George Mason University released the study earlier this week. The center counts among its key backers the Koch family, and conservative financier Charles Koch sits on the center's board.
More faux news?
My GOD!!! CIRCLE THE WAGONS!!!!!!!
 

itfitzme

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Very well. I get it. you are insulted that the study found blue states as fiscally unsound. Excellent! Now will you be so kind as to find another study that disagrees with this one? They come out every so often and the worst states rarely change.
What are you talking about? I'm just reading the measurements of the study so I understand them.

The very first sentence in the abstract says;



The second sentence of the abstract is



That is pretty much what I picked up reading the study for a better understanding. She's got, "cash solvency", "budget solvency", "long-run solvency" and "service-level solvency" as her basic measures.

Three indicators comprise the cash solvency index: the cash, quick, and current ratios.
Two financial indicators make up the budget solvency index: operating ratio and the surplus (or deficit) per capita.
Three indicators measure long-run solvency: net asset ratio, longterm liability ratio, and long-term liabilities per capita.
Three measures also compose the service-level solvency index: tax per capita, revenue per capita, and expense per capita

I'm not close to deciding if I like them or not.

Nowhere have I said shit about what states are what. I suspect that you are simply projecting.
An assessment based upon what you posted and an accurate one at that. You did not post them so as to study them. You could have done that on your own. No, you want to challenge the findings. Why post the above at all if your not challenging the findings? You wanted to add to the op? I don't think so.
So your decision to post, speak, ... communicate is driven by personal apriori biases. Okay, I get that. The OP was to present your biased position

I do what is refered to as "critical thinking" and "conversing". I don't have to have a previous bias to think.

Your OP didn't burrow down the study. Did you follow the links and pull ep the study yourself?

I picked out a solid set of statements from the paper that summarize it. And, as it turns out, they are exactly how the author summarized her own study. I just picked out the ones in the body that exemplify the shorter abstract.

Personally, I'm not sure how one measures a state's "fiscal condition". Governments aren't simply households or bisinesses. They are kinda unique. They depend on a functioning economy to fund the services they provide to ensure a functioning economy. For example, no highways, no transportation, no economy, no funding for highways. Privately owned toll roads never really took off for some reason.

The author has eleven measures in four catagories.

I can, though, be certain that if you can't read a few statements from the study, that you pointed to, without getting your panties all in a bunch, you've got no hope of being objective.
 
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Publius1787

Publius1787

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What are you talking about? I'm just reading the measurements of the study so I understand them.

The very first sentence in the abstract says;



The second sentence of the abstract is



That is pretty much what I picked up reading the study for a better understanding. She's got, "cash solvency", "budget solvency", "long-run solvency" and "service-level solvency" as her basic measures.




I'm not close to deciding if I like them or not.

Nowhere have I said shit about what states are what. I suspect that you are simply projecting.
An assessment based upon what you posted and an accurate one at that. You did not post them so as to study them. You could have done that on your own. No, you want to challenge the findings. Why post the above at all if your not challenging the findings? You wanted to add to the op? I don't think so.
So your decision to post, speak, ... communicate is driven by personal apriori biases. Okay, I get that. The OP was to present your biased position

I do what is refered to as "critical thinking" and "conversing". I don't have to have a previous bias to think.

Your OP didn't burrow down the study. Did you follow the links and pull ep the study yourself?

I picked out a solid set of statements from the paper that summarize it. And, as it turns out, they are exactly how the author summarized her own study. I just picked out the ones in the body that exemplify the shorter abstract.

Personally, I'm not sure how one measures a state's "fiscal condition". Governments aren't simply households or bisinesses. They are kinda unique. They depend on a functioning economy to fund the services they provide to ensure a functioning economy. For example, no highways, no transportation, no economy, no funding for highways. Privately owned toll roads never really took off for some reason.

The author has eleven measures in four catagories.

I can, though, be certain that if you can't read a few statements from the study, that you pointed to, without getting your panties all in a bunch, you've got no hope of being objective.
I did post a partisan OP. Did I hide this fact? After reviewing many of these over the years I see a common trend. No matter which study you pull up you will find the same top 10 states +- one or two with another blue state. I did see the study and the cnbc article was not where I originally got the information. Any way you have it, by anyone's standard the most fiscally unsound states are usually the same.
 

Dont Taz Me Bro

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The Mercatus Center at George Mason University released the study earlier this week. The center counts among its key backers the Koch family, and conservative financier Charles Koch sits on the center's board.
More faux news?
Nope, just a red herring. I guessed most of the states on the "Worst List" before I even scrolled down to see it. I knew which ones they were because I pay attention. California, New Jersey, Illinois, New York have been buried under debt for years and it's been getting steadily worse because they keep pimping the entitlements and full of corruption in their governments.
 

Desperado

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Florida is listed as one of the most fiscally sound states. I think we can thank our Republican governor
Rick Scott for that.
 

william the wie

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A more objective measure is bond rating/CDS premiums on the bonds. So the worst ratings even though it requires some digging is in CA state guarantees of local junk bonds. IL is not yet officially junk but it has no vendor credit to speak of anywhere in the state. NYC had to be bailed out twice in the 20th century. Those three are the walking dead.

As to 4-10 I will defer to the caveats of the study but CA, IL and NY have been on life support for a very long time. Since the pre-WW I bailout by JPM in the case of NY.
 

william the wie

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Florida is listed as one of the most fiscally sound states. I think we can thank our Republican governor
Rick Scott for that.
Yes, remarkably the Ds managed to dig up an even bigger scumbag than Scott in the last election and seem set to do that again this election.
 

OnePercenter

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Now for the fine print.

Seems the study was from 2012. It doesn't include California's 2013 $2.4 Billion budget surplus.
 

Listening

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Now for the fine print.

Seems the study was from 2012. It doesn't include California's 2013 $2.4 Billion budget surplus.
You are kidding...right ?

You really missed the 10 threads that discussed the fact that there is no surplus. It's all a game being played by the dems in the state house.
 
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Publius1787

Publius1787

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Now for the fine print.

Seems the study was from 2012. It doesn't include California's 2013 $2.4 Billion budget surplus.
You are kidding...right ?

You really missed the 10 threads that discussed the fact that there is no surplus. It's all a game being played by the dems in the state house.
Fiscal games is what the dems play best. Double counting and parliamentary tricks before the CBO is their specialty.
 

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