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CDZ Police Reform Ideas

GMCGeneral

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In another thread, I alluded to a rather extended and pleasant conversation I had with two gentlemen, one of which is the Commissioner for the Buffalo Municipal Housing Authority and I brought the subject up of police reform for the Buffalo PD. Ultimately, what got me thinking were two points that if implemented, would reduce problems within the force by at least 85-90%, IMO. He (the commissioner) brought up the fact that Buffalo was sorely lacking in Field Training Officers, who's role is to help probationary officers do the job properly and rein them in when needed. More on that one later as training in any field is a huge issue with me. The other thing, I think, has more to do with intimacy with the communities and neighborhoods at large. Back in the early 90s under the Masiello Administration, someone brought up the ideas of consolidating the 16 or so police precincts into five districts, and switching from two man to one man patrol cars. Their thinking was that it would save money with physical buildings.

1. But at what cost? I think it was a horrible idea as it forced patrols into larger areas and we lost that connection with our local precinct. I live in the South side of the city and used to be in the 15th Precinct (Now A district). South Buffalo, which includes the old First Ward, Kaisertown, and the Valley used to be in the 15th, 9th, and 7th precincts, respectively. Upper East Side/University was under the 11th, 12th, and 16th precincts.
My thinking is we bring back precincts it would reduce the amount of patrol area an officer has to cover and also restore alot of the intimacy with the neighborhoods they're patrolling

2. Training, training, training!!! This is a huge issue with me as I value proper training. From what I was told, rookie cops in Buffalo are typically unleashed within the city without proper oversight and supervision from a Field Training Officer (FTO), Senior officers who are tasked to "break in" probationers. Seems nobody wants the job as they see it as a "step down" in their status. End result is what we are seeing with police misconduct, conduct unbecoming, and excessive use of force. This can be an easy fix. For any officer desiring to move up into command ranks (Sergeant or greater), make it mandatory that they spend at least two to three years as a Field Training Officer first!

Two simple solutions that I think can resolve 85-90% of the issues in my PD.
Any other ideas?
 

Scottish_Brexiteer_UK

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They can start by actually backing their officers and accepting responsibility that it's guidelines and protocols that they set out for them - and not then helping to string them up to appease brainwashed blacks and the race baiting Democrats & media.
 
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Fueri

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It is quite simple to statistically identify problem cops.

All this other stuff may have some marginal impact, but we can't reduce policing, by and large, without crime going up, so we need guys with guns apprehending criminals. We need to identify bad cops and move them, not drastically rethink policing.
 

Scottish_Brexiteer_UK

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They can start by actually backing their officers and accepting responsibility that it's guidelines and protocols that they set out for them - before helping stringing them up to appease brainwashed blacks and the race baiting Democrats & media.
This is where FTOs come in.
There's nothing wrong with their training though. What do you change exactly? take their guns off them? tell them they've got to be shot at or stabbed first before firing?
 
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They can start by actually backing their officers and accepting responsibility that it's guidelines and protocols that they set out for them - before helping stringing them up to appease brainwashed blacks and the race baiting Democrats & media.
This is where FTOs come in.
There's nothing wrong with their training though. What do you change exactly? take their guns off them? tell them they've got to be shot at or stabbed first before firing?
No, the FTO's job is to "break in" rookie officers and mentor them to do the job right, rein them in when they aren't. The issues is unleashing rookies without this first year of breaking in. That's where alot of these problem are arising.
 
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It is quite simple to statistically identify problem cops.

All this other stuff may have some marginal impact, but we can't reduce policing, by and large, without crime going up, so we need guys with guns apprehending criminals. We need to identify bad cops and move them, not drastically rethink policing.
Not talking about reducing law enforcement at all, just simply tightening patrol areas back to the old style precinct level.
 

alang1216

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In another thread, I alluded to a rather extended and pleasant conversation I had with two gentlemen, one of which is the Commissioner for the Buffalo Municipal Housing Authority and I brought the subject up of police reform for the Buffalo PD. Ultimately, what got me thinking were two points that if implemented, would reduce problems within the force by at least 85-90%, IMO. He (the commissioner) brought up the fact that Buffalo was sorely lacking in Field Training Officers, who's role is to help probationary officers do the job properly and rein them in when needed. More on that one later as training in any field is a huge issue with me. The other thing, I think, has more to do with intimacy with the communities and neighborhoods at large. Back in the early 90s under the Masiello Administration, someone brought up the ideas of consolidating the 16 or so police precincts into five districts, and switching from two man to one man patrol cars. Their thinking was that it would save money with physical buildings.

1. But at what cost? I think it was a horrible idea as it forced patrols into larger areas and we lost that connection with our local precinct. I live in the South side of the city and used to be in the 15th Precinct (Now A district). South Buffalo, which includes the old First Ward, Kaisertown, and the Valley used to be in the 15th, 9th, and 7th precincts, respectively. Upper East Side/University was under the 11th, 12th, and 16th precincts.
My thinking is we bring back precincts it would reduce the amount of patrol area an officer has to cover and also restore alot of the intimacy with the neighborhoods they're patrolling

2. Training, training, training!!! This is a huge issue with me as I value proper training. From what I was told, rookie cops in Buffalo are typically unleashed within the city without proper oversight and supervision from a Field Training Officer (FTO), Senior officers who are tasked to "break in" probationers. Seems nobody wants the job as they see it as a "step down" in their status. End result is what we are seeing with police misconduct, conduct unbecoming, and excessive use of force. This can be an easy fix. For any officer desiring to move up into command ranks (Sergeant or greater), make it mandatory that they spend at least two to three years as a Field Training Officer first!

Two simple solutions that I think can resolve 85-90% of the issues in my PD.
Any other ideas?
I'm good with expanding training. I'd think an apprentice program would help. New cops patrol with body cams, radios, but no guns. If there is a situation they don't think they can handle they call for either a mental health agent or an armed (and senior) cop. Both would be on call, ready to go and just minutes away.
 

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GMCGeneral

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In another thread, I alluded to a rather extended and pleasant conversation I had with two gentlemen, one of which is the Commissioner for the Buffalo Municipal Housing Authority and I brought the subject up of police reform for the Buffalo PD. Ultimately, what got me thinking were two points that if implemented, would reduce problems within the force by at least 85-90%, IMO. He (the commissioner) brought up the fact that Buffalo was sorely lacking in Field Training Officers, who's role is to help probationary officers do the job properly and rein them in when needed. More on that one later as training in any field is a huge issue with me. The other thing, I think, has more to do with intimacy with the communities and neighborhoods at large. Back in the early 90s under the Masiello Administration, someone brought up the ideas of consolidating the 16 or so police precincts into five districts, and switching from two man to one man patrol cars. Their thinking was that it would save money with physical buildings.

1. But at what cost? I think it was a horrible idea as it forced patrols into larger areas and we lost that connection with our local precinct. I live in the South side of the city and used to be in the 15th Precinct (Now A district). South Buffalo, which includes the old First Ward, Kaisertown, and the Valley used to be in the 15th, 9th, and 7th precincts, respectively. Upper East Side/University was under the 11th, 12th, and 16th precincts.
My thinking is we bring back precincts it would reduce the amount of patrol area an officer has to cover and also restore alot of the intimacy with the neighborhoods they're patrolling

2. Training, training, training!!! This is a huge issue with me as I value proper training. From what I was told, rookie cops in Buffalo are typically unleashed within the city without proper oversight and supervision from a Field Training Officer (FTO), Senior officers who are tasked to "break in" probationers. Seems nobody wants the job as they see it as a "step down" in their status. End result is what we are seeing with police misconduct, conduct unbecoming, and excessive use of force. This can be an easy fix. For any officer desiring to move up into command ranks (Sergeant or greater), make it mandatory that they spend at least two to three years as a Field Training Officer first!

Two simple solutions that I think can resolve 85-90% of the issues in my PD.
Any other ideas?
I'm good with expanding training. I'd think an apprentice program would help. New cops patrol with body cams, radios, but no guns. If there is a situation they don't think they can handle they call for either a mental health agent or an armed (and senior) cop. Both would be on call, ready to go and just minutes away.
If you're old enough to watch the Jack Webb series "Adam-12", you had Pete Malloy, who was a senior officer then promoted to FTO and his rookie Jim Reed. Both were armed, but Malloy knew how to train Reed right. Don't disarm the probationer, but the FTO needs wide discretion in order to train the probie right.
 

alang1216

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In another thread, I alluded to a rather extended and pleasant conversation I had with two gentlemen, one of which is the Commissioner for the Buffalo Municipal Housing Authority and I brought the subject up of police reform for the Buffalo PD. Ultimately, what got me thinking were two points that if implemented, would reduce problems within the force by at least 85-90%, IMO. He (the commissioner) brought up the fact that Buffalo was sorely lacking in Field Training Officers, who's role is to help probationary officers do the job properly and rein them in when needed. More on that one later as training in any field is a huge issue with me. The other thing, I think, has more to do with intimacy with the communities and neighborhoods at large. Back in the early 90s under the Masiello Administration, someone brought up the ideas of consolidating the 16 or so police precincts into five districts, and switching from two man to one man patrol cars. Their thinking was that it would save money with physical buildings.

1. But at what cost? I think it was a horrible idea as it forced patrols into larger areas and we lost that connection with our local precinct. I live in the South side of the city and used to be in the 15th Precinct (Now A district). South Buffalo, which includes the old First Ward, Kaisertown, and the Valley used to be in the 15th, 9th, and 7th precincts, respectively. Upper East Side/University was under the 11th, 12th, and 16th precincts.
My thinking is we bring back precincts it would reduce the amount of patrol area an officer has to cover and also restore alot of the intimacy with the neighborhoods they're patrolling

2. Training, training, training!!! This is a huge issue with me as I value proper training. From what I was told, rookie cops in Buffalo are typically unleashed within the city without proper oversight and supervision from a Field Training Officer (FTO), Senior officers who are tasked to "break in" probationers. Seems nobody wants the job as they see it as a "step down" in their status. End result is what we are seeing with police misconduct, conduct unbecoming, and excessive use of force. This can be an easy fix. For any officer desiring to move up into command ranks (Sergeant or greater), make it mandatory that they spend at least two to three years as a Field Training Officer first!

Two simple solutions that I think can resolve 85-90% of the issues in my PD.
Any other ideas?
I'm good with expanding training. I'd think an apprentice program would help. New cops patrol with body cams, radios, but no guns. If there is a situation they don't think they can handle they call for either a mental health agent or an armed (and senior) cop. Both would be on call, ready to go and just minutes away.
If you're old enough to watch the Jack Webb series "Adam-12", you had Pete Malloy, who was a senior officer then promoted to FTO and his rookie Jim Reed. Both were armed, but Malloy knew how to train Reed right. Don't disarm the probationer, but the FTO needs wide discretion in order to train the probie right.
Expensive solution, you need twice the cops. I'm not saying it's not a good idea, just might not be a practical one. I'd also like to see national police standards for training. Not every town can afford to develop its own training program.
 

sartre play

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We need police, but what training would make them good police? We could look at the written test they have to pass, maybe that could use some reworking? Must be some solutions that don't swing in radical left or right directions.
 
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In another thread, I alluded to a rather extended and pleasant conversation I had with two gentlemen, one of which is the Commissioner for the Buffalo Municipal Housing Authority and I brought the subject up of police reform for the Buffalo PD. Ultimately, what got me thinking were two points that if implemented, would reduce problems within the force by at least 85-90%, IMO. He (the commissioner) brought up the fact that Buffalo was sorely lacking in Field Training Officers, who's role is to help probationary officers do the job properly and rein them in when needed. More on that one later as training in any field is a huge issue with me. The other thing, I think, has more to do with intimacy with the communities and neighborhoods at large. Back in the early 90s under the Masiello Administration, someone brought up the ideas of consolidating the 16 or so police precincts into five districts, and switching from two man to one man patrol cars. Their thinking was that it would save money with physical buildings.

1. But at what cost? I think it was a horrible idea as it forced patrols into larger areas and we lost that connection with our local precinct. I live in the South side of the city and used to be in the 15th Precinct (Now A district). South Buffalo, which includes the old First Ward, Kaisertown, and the Valley used to be in the 15th, 9th, and 7th precincts, respectively. Upper East Side/University was under the 11th, 12th, and 16th precincts.
My thinking is we bring back precincts it would reduce the amount of patrol area an officer has to cover and also restore alot of the intimacy with the neighborhoods they're patrolling

2. Training, training, training!!! This is a huge issue with me as I value proper training. From what I was told, rookie cops in Buffalo are typically unleashed within the city without proper oversight and supervision from a Field Training Officer (FTO), Senior officers who are tasked to "break in" probationers. Seems nobody wants the job as they see it as a "step down" in their status. End result is what we are seeing with police misconduct, conduct unbecoming, and excessive use of force. This can be an easy fix. For any officer desiring to move up into command ranks (Sergeant or greater), make it mandatory that they spend at least two to three years as a Field Training Officer first!

Two simple solutions that I think can resolve 85-90% of the issues in my PD.
Any other ideas?
I'm good with expanding training. I'd think an apprentice program would help. New cops patrol with body cams, radios, but no guns. If there is a situation they don't think they can handle they call for either a mental health agent or an armed (and senior) cop. Both would be on call, ready to go and just minutes away.
If you're old enough to watch the Jack Webb series "Adam-12", you had Pete Malloy, who was a senior officer then promoted to FTO and his rookie Jim Reed. Both were armed, but Malloy knew how to train Reed right. Don't disarm the probationer, but the FTO needs wide discretion in order to train the probie right.
Expensive solution, you need twice the cops. I'm not saying it's not a good idea, just might not be a practical one. I'd also like to see national police standards for training. Not every town can afford to develop its own training program.
But that's the ONLY correct way to solve this. Again, make duty as an FTO a requirement for promotion to supervisory ranks. And there are enough cops in my area to facilitate all having two man cars.
 
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We need police, but what training would make them good police? We could look at the written test they have to pass, maybe that could use some reworking? Must be some solutions that don't swing in radical left or right directions.
Not just that, but reinstate oral boards on promotion exams, make Field Training duty a requirement for promotion as well.
 

Fueri

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In another thread, I alluded to a rather extended and pleasant conversation I had with two gentlemen, one of which is the Commissioner for the Buffalo Municipal Housing Authority and I brought the subject up of police reform for the Buffalo PD. Ultimately, what got me thinking were two points that if implemented, would reduce problems within the force by at least 85-90%, IMO. He (the commissioner) brought up the fact that Buffalo was sorely lacking in Field Training Officers, who's role is to help probationary officers do the job properly and rein them in when needed. More on that one later as training in any field is a huge issue with me. The other thing, I think, has more to do with intimacy with the communities and neighborhoods at large. Back in the early 90s under the Masiello Administration, someone brought up the ideas of consolidating the 16 or so police precincts into five districts, and switching from two man to one man patrol cars. Their thinking was that it would save money with physical buildings.

1. But at what cost? I think it was a horrible idea as it forced patrols into larger areas and we lost that connection with our local precinct. I live in the South side of the city and used to be in the 15th Precinct (Now A district). South Buffalo, which includes the old First Ward, Kaisertown, and the Valley used to be in the 15th, 9th, and 7th precincts, respectively. Upper East Side/University was under the 11th, 12th, and 16th precincts.
My thinking is we bring back precincts it would reduce the amount of patrol area an officer has to cover and also restore alot of the intimacy with the neighborhoods they're patrolling

2. Training, training, training!!! This is a huge issue with me as I value proper training. From what I was told, rookie cops in Buffalo are typically unleashed within the city without proper oversight and supervision from a Field Training Officer (FTO), Senior officers who are tasked to "break in" probationers. Seems nobody wants the job as they see it as a "step down" in their status. End result is what we are seeing with police misconduct, conduct unbecoming, and excessive use of force. This can be an easy fix. For any officer desiring to move up into command ranks (Sergeant or greater), make it mandatory that they spend at least two to three years as a Field Training Officer first!

Two simple solutions that I think can resolve 85-90% of the issues in my PD.
Any other ideas?
I'm good with expanding training. I'd think an apprentice program would help. New cops patrol with body cams, radios, but no guns. If there is a situation they don't think they can handle they call for either a mental health agent or an armed (and senior) cop. Both would be on call, ready to go and just minutes away.
If you're old enough to watch the Jack Webb series "Adam-12", you had Pete Malloy, who was a senior officer then promoted to FTO and his rookie Jim Reed. Both were armed, but Malloy knew how to train Reed right. Don't disarm the probationer, but the FTO needs wide discretion in order to train the probie right.
Expensive solution, you need twice the cops. I'm not saying it's not a good idea, just might not be a practical one. I'd also like to see national police standards for training. Not every town can afford to develop its own training program.
But that's the ONLY correct way to solve this. Again, make duty as an FTO a requirement for promotion to supervisory ranks. And there are enough cops in my area to facilitate all having two man cars.


Yeah, I dunno.

I am not discounting proper training as I'm a huge believer in it as well.

My problem with this angle is that nobody ever said the problem is dumb cops. Any of these guys, IMO, can pass training and behave under the watchful eye of superiors.

IMHO statistically identifying these guys is the best, fastest and most reasonably priced solution. Problem there is the unions. They'll fight it every step of the way.

And nobody said we can't do both. And, IMO, we should. A lot of this is predictable and therefore preventable.
 

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In another thread, I alluded to a rather extended and pleasant conversation I had with two gentlemen, one of which is the Commissioner for the Buffalo Municipal Housing Authority and I brought the subject up of police reform for the Buffalo PD. Ultimately, what got me thinking were two points that if implemented, would reduce problems within the force by at least 85-90%, IMO. He (the commissioner) brought up the fact that Buffalo was sorely lacking in Field Training Officers, who's role is to help probationary officers do the job properly and rein them in when needed. More on that one later as training in any field is a huge issue with me. The other thing, I think, has more to do with intimacy with the communities and neighborhoods at large. Back in the early 90s under the Masiello Administration, someone brought up the ideas of consolidating the 16 or so police precincts into five districts, and switching from two man to one man patrol cars. Their thinking was that it would save money with physical buildings.

1. But at what cost? I think it was a horrible idea as it forced patrols into larger areas and we lost that connection with our local precinct. I live in the South side of the city and used to be in the 15th Precinct (Now A district). South Buffalo, which includes the old First Ward, Kaisertown, and the Valley used to be in the 15th, 9th, and 7th precincts, respectively. Upper East Side/University was under the 11th, 12th, and 16th precincts.
My thinking is we bring back precincts it would reduce the amount of patrol area an officer has to cover and also restore alot of the intimacy with the neighborhoods they're patrolling

2. Training, training, training!!! This is a huge issue with me as I value proper training. From what I was told, rookie cops in Buffalo are typically unleashed within the city without proper oversight and supervision from a Field Training Officer (FTO), Senior officers who are tasked to "break in" probationers. Seems nobody wants the job as they see it as a "step down" in their status. End result is what we are seeing with police misconduct, conduct unbecoming, and excessive use of force. This can be an easy fix. For any officer desiring to move up into command ranks (Sergeant or greater), make it mandatory that they spend at least two to three years as a Field Training Officer first!

Two simple solutions that I think can resolve 85-90% of the issues in my PD.
Any other ideas?


Here are my ideas on police reform:
  1. Double the number of police. I want to see them everywhere walking a beat keeping order.
  2. A less militant, less confrontational look to their uniforms.
  3. More protection for police so they can relax, feel safer and be more friendly.
  4. Fewer fucking lights flashing and blinking all over their car. One or two big rotating lights on top was enough.
  5. Much stricter fines and penalties for not cooperating with police, including mouthing off to them. Shut your damn mouth and do what you are told.
 

Mr Joe

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In another thread, I alluded to a rather extended and pleasant conversation I had with two gentlemen, one of which is the Commissioner for the Buffalo Municipal Housing Authority and I brought the subject up of police reform for the Buffalo PD. Ultimately, what got me thinking were two points that if implemented, would reduce problems within the force by at least 85-90%, IMO. He (the commissioner) brought up the fact that Buffalo was sorely lacking in Field Training Officers, who's role is to help probationary officers do the job properly and rein them in when needed. More on that one later as training in any field is a huge issue with me. The other thing, I think, has more to do with intimacy with the communities and neighborhoods at large. Back in the early 90s under the Masiello Administration, someone brought up the ideas of consolidating the 16 or so police precincts into five districts, and switching from two man to one man patrol cars. Their thinking was that it would save money with physical buildings.

1. But at what cost? I think it was a horrible idea as it forced patrols into larger areas and we lost that connection with our local precinct. I live in the South side of the city and used to be in the 15th Precinct (Now A district). South Buffalo, which includes the old First Ward, Kaisertown, and the Valley used to be in the 15th, 9th, and 7th precincts, respectively. Upper East Side/University was under the 11th, 12th, and 16th precincts.
My thinking is we bring back precincts it would reduce the amount of patrol area an officer has to cover and also restore alot of the intimacy with the neighborhoods they're patrolling

2. Training, training, training!!! This is a huge issue with me as I value proper training. From what I was told, rookie cops in Buffalo are typically unleashed within the city without proper oversight and supervision from a Field Training Officer (FTO), Senior officers who are tasked to "break in" probationers. Seems nobody wants the job as they see it as a "step down" in their status. End result is what we are seeing with police misconduct, conduct unbecoming, and excessive use of force. This can be an easy fix. For any officer desiring to move up into command ranks (Sergeant or greater), make it mandatory that they spend at least two to three years as a Field Training Officer first!

Two simple solutions that I think can resolve 85-90% of the issues in my PD.
Any other ideas?
Pass a law that anyone who resists arrest can be shot.
 

Pellinore

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My first thought is that every police officer should have a body camera on, with sound, all the time. I have yet to hear a reasonable argument why a police officer should be able to turn off their camera.
 

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I've got no objections to this. Just a note to add.
Too many violent thugs getting off too easy because people think they're human too. And want to give them all their supposed rights. Screw that. Apparently people don't respect or fear punishment. Life in prison for some, is just another life. Not to mention the fact that 64% of people that go to prison, return again after being released the first time. Which means that 64% of the money we spend on prisons is wasted. Especially when you consider the fact that when a convict is released back into society, he/she's is no more "fit for society" than where he went in.

Getting 64% of the convicts to not commit crimes after they're released, will reduce the number of calls that police have to respond to.
 

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My first thought is that every police officer should have a body camera on, with sound, all the time. I have yet to hear a reasonable argument why a police officer should be able to turn off their camera.

Because it's just not necessary. If someone isn't trusted to be an LEO, they shouldn't hire them. I wouldn't work for ANYONE that didn't trust me to do my job. Turning it on just prior to an interaction is reasonable.
 

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