Matthew 12:40

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rstrats

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Penelope,

I'm afraid I don't see where your link shows examples of where a daytime or a night time was forecast or said to be involved with an event when no part of a daytime or no part of a night time could have occurred. What do you have in mind?
 

The Irish Ram

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Whenever the three days and three nights of Matthew 12:40 is brought up in a “discussion” with 6th day crucifixion folks, they frequently argue that it is a Jewish idiom for counting any part of a day as a whole day. I wonder if anyone has documentation that shows that the phrase “x” days and “x”nights was ever used in the first century or before when it absolutely didn'’t include at least parts of the “x” days and at least parts of the “x” nights?
We tend to view things according to the only calendar we've ever known, which was not the calendar in use at the time Christ died. And there were back to back Sabbaths that week.
This may help:

 
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The Irish Ram,

I'm afraid your comments deal with issues for a different topic. This particular topic is concerned with one issue and only one issue:

1. The Messiah said that He would spend 3 nights in the "heart of the earth".

2. There are some who believe that the crucifixion took place on the 6th day of the week with the resurrection taking place on the 1st day of the week.

3. Of those, there are some who believe that the "heart of the earth" is referring to the tomb.

4, Of those, there may be some who try to explain the resulting lack of a 3rd night by saying that the Messiah was using common idiomatic/figure of speech/colloquial language of the time.

5. If it was common , there would have to be multiple examples of such usage in order to legitimately assert that it was common to forecast a daytime or a night time being involved with an event when no part of the daytime or no part of the night time could occur.

6. I am simply asking anyone who falls in the above category to provide some of those examples which show that it was common usage.
 

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It is called the Winter Solstice, “sun stood still”, and is considered the shortest day in the year in terms of hours of sunlight. It is a three-day period when the hours of daylight are at its shortest and the hours of night (darkness) are at its longest.Dec 19, 2016
december 22 – 25: the death and birth of the unconquered sun

https://notclif.wordpress.com › 2016/12/19 › december-21-25-the-death-and...


everyone would celebrate the death and rebirth of the sun from the beginning of time.

Why Christmas Celebrated on the 25th December?
 
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re: "It is called the Winter Solstice, 'sun stood still', and is considered the shortest day in the year in terms of hours of sunlight."

That's an issue for a different topic.
 

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re: "It is called the Winter Solstice, 'sun stood still', and is considered the shortest day in the year in terms of hours of sunlight."

That's an issue for a different topic.
No its not, it shows people were known to think of the sun and the winter solstice, 3 days and 3 nights, the death and rebirth of the sun.

What is different about it?? Its about a dying sun and rebirth of the sun. That is why many cultures have the trinity, as some people call it the triad of Gods.

What the heck are you asking for, in simple terms?
 
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Penelope,
re: "No its not..."

Yes it is. This topic is about one issue and only one issue.



re: "What the heck are you asking for..."

I say "what" in post #183.
 

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Penelope,
re: "No its not..."

Yes it is. This topic is about one issue and only one issue.



re: "What the heck are you asking for..."

I say "what" in post #183.
In a quick sentence what do you want? What issue is this about?
 
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Penelope,
re: "In a quick sentence what do you want?"

Examples which show that it was common to forecast or say that a daytime or a night time would be involved with an event when no part of a daytime or no part of a night time could occur.




re: "What issue is this about?"

Read post #183.
 
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Someone new looking in may know of examples.
 

luchitociencia

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We tend to view things according to the only calendar we've ever known, which was not the calendar in use at the time Christ died. And there were back to back Sabbaths that week.
This may help:


Error, you count three night and two day parts in that diagram.

Make him die on Wednesday when the Sun is setting. He will be technically in the tomb in the night side of 5th day (For us Wednesday night)

From here, count three nights, will give you, Wednesday night time, Thursday night time, and Friday night time, with the correspondent Thursday day time, Friday day time and Saturday day time.

Remember that Saturday night is for them 1st day of the week.

He stayed INSIDE the tomb complete three night times and complete three day day times.

His resurrection happened as soon as Sabbath was over, any moment between Saturday night and Sunday sunrise.
 
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luchitociencia,
re: "He stayed INSIDE the tomb complete three night times and complete three day day times."

That would be an issue for a different topic.
 
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Since it's been awhile, maybe someone new visiting this topic may know of examples.
 
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rstrats

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And again, that "someone new" needs to be someone who believes the crucifixion took place on the 6th day of the week with a 1st day of the week resurrection, and who thinks that the "heart of the earth" is referring to the tomb, and who tries to explain the lack of a 3rd night by saying that the Messiah was employing common figure of speech/colloquial language of the period.
 

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There were two Passovers the week he was crucified.



When the new moon is first observed at night the above alignment will occur. This was the arrangement for the years 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 34 and 35 CE.13 Thus, Jesus was crucified on Nisan 15 according to the Temple calendar and on Nisan 14 according to the Diaspora calendar. Jesus would likely have eaten the Passover according the Temple calendar. John's description must have recognized the later observance by the sunset calendar of a Seder with no lamb. This is probably the same sunset reckoning used by Paul, who described Jesus as our Passover; the Lamb of God was sacrificed instead of the Pascal lamb. The above alignment only supports a Friday crucifixion in 30 CE. Then, Jesus died on Friday, which was Nisan 14 on the sunset calendar and Nisan 15 on the sunrise calendar.

The above alignment does not support a Thursday crucifixion in 30 CE on Nisan 14 according to the sunrise calendar. It then becomes necessary to establish that the Last Supper was not a Passover meal. This is difficult, since that meal followed the slaying of the Passover lambs, and Jesus said that He was going to "eat the Passover with My disciples." (Mark 14:14) It also does not support a Wednesday crucifixion in 31 CE on Nisan 15 according to the sunset calendar. Then Jesus would have been crucified on the day following the second Passover, unless there was a late intercalated Ve-Adar.

When the crescent of the new moon was first observed between sunrise and sunset the following alignment occurs, as shown on Chart XXVIII. It is correct for the years 27, 33 and 36 CE. Here, Jesus would have been crucified on Nisan 14 on the Temple or Diaspora calendars. However, in this case the Passover lambs would have to have been slain on Nisan 13, in contradiction to keeping the lamb "until the fourteenth day of the same month . . . to kill it at twilight." (Exod. 12:6) The two Passovers due to the calendar difference exclude 27, 33 and 36 CE as possible years for Jesus' crucifixion. With a Friday crucifixion in 33 CE, that day must fall on Nisan 14 by either sunrise or sunset reckoning. It is again necessary to establish that the Last Supper was not a Passover supper. This requires ignoring the words of Matthew, Mark, Luke and Jesus, and relying solely on the Jews and John's usage of "Passover." As will be discussed below, the Passover may refer only to the Feast of Unleavened Bread. And still there is no explaining away the slaying of the lambs before the Last Supper. A 33 CE crucifixion is not possible if the two Passovers are to be explained by the calendar difference between sunrise and sunset reckoning.14


The 'Second Passover' that week was the "Feast Of Unleavened Bread', so there is no real contradictions between John and the synoptic gospels re the Passover' issue.

Another explanation:


... at the same site a timeline of Passover Week:


Using the Bible as a timeline, we can know exactly what transpired during the Passover Week and follow Jesus as He rode into Jerusalem on Sunday until His crucifixion on Wednesday and subsequent resurrection three days later.


The Jewish day starts and ends at six o'clock in the evening, while our day starts and ends at midnight; their daytime begins at six o'clock in the morning and it was referred to as the "first hour."





Does this help anything? Probably not in this board. lol
 
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Picaro,
re: "Does this help anything?"

No, at least not with regard to the issue with which this topic is concerned.
 
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.oldschool,
re: "Perhaps 'heart of the earth' has a different meaning than you imagine."

Perhaps, but that would be an issue for a different topic. Maybe you could start one.
 

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Picaro,
re: "Does this help anything?"

No, at least not with regard to the issue with which this topic is concerned.
Sure it does; you just don't know what you're asking about.
 
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Picaro,
re: "Sure it does; you just don't know what you're asking about."

Of course I do. I've said 'what' in a number of posts and most recently in posts #183 and #189. Why do you say that I don't?
 

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