Mahayana Buddhism

Skull

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If I had to pick one Mahayana text that covers every aspect of doctrine, path & results, I would suggest this one - in Sanskrit titled Mahayanasutralamkara. There are two excellent English translations, with commentaries. It is a large book with the commentaries, but those comments are needed to clarify these many altruistic verses

One came out in 2014 done by the Dharmachakra translation group and the other from the Padmakara translators just came out late in 2018.

The root text was taught to Asanga (a bodhisattva of the 5th century) by Maitreya a 10th stage bodhisattva, who will become in the distant future our next Buddha.

Ornament of the Great Vehicle Sutras is the title of the Dharmachakra version.

The Padmakara version is called A Feast of the Nectar of the Supreme Vehicle.

Both are in epub versions also.
 

Blackrook

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You need to explain why we should be interested in your religion, not just tell us where to read up on it.
 
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You need to explain why we should be interested in your religion, not just tell us where to read up on it.
Motivation is supplied from within, so whether others decide to investigate Mahayana or not, is up to them. I am not a preacher.
 

Taz

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You need to explain why we should be interested in your religion, not just tell us where to read up on it.
Motivation is supplied from within, so whether others decide to investigate Mahayana or not, is up to them. I am not a preacher.
Not preach, simply explain why it's worthwhile.

And brah, you didn't even supply a link to the texts. You know you're on the internet, right?
 
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Skull

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You need to explain why we should be interested in your religion, not just tell us where to read up on it.
Motivation is supplied from within, so whether others decide to investigate Mahayana or not, is up to them. I am not a preacher.
Not preach, simply explain why it's worthwhile.

And brah, you didn't even supply a link to the texts. You know you're on the internet, right?
It may not be worthwhile to many, they will decide, yea or nay.

You also are on said internet - seek and ye shall find.
 

Taz

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You need to explain why we should be interested in your religion, not just tell us where to read up on it.
Motivation is supplied from within, so whether others decide to investigate Mahayana or not, is up to them. I am not a preacher.
Not preach, simply explain why it's worthwhile.

And brah, you didn't even supply a link to the texts. You know you're on the internet, right?
It may not be worthwhile to many, they will decide, yea or nay.

You also are on said internet - seek and ye shall find.
Your thread, you add the links. I’m not doing it for you, just telling you how it is.
 
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BlackFlag

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You need to explain why we should be interested in your religion, not just tell us where to read up on it.
Motivation is supplied from within, so whether others decide to investigate Mahayana or not, is up to them. I am not a preacher.
Not preach, simply explain why it's worthwhile.

And brah, you didn't even supply a link to the texts. You know you're on the internet, right?
It may not be worthwhile to many, they will decide, yea or nay.

You also are on said internet - seek and ye shall find.
Your thread, you add the links. I’m not doing it for you, just telling you how it is. Maybe you should just get the fuck off the internet.
Christ... :cuckoo:
 
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A tiny sample from the Padmakara Foreword:

FOREWORD

JIGME KHYENTSE RINPOCHE

In an age when science claims to have an answer for everything and is even attempting to prove the validity of Buddhist meditation, while many people’s ideas about different religions and spiritual paths reduce these to simplistic and misleading stereotypes, it is hard to comprehend the true breadth and profundity of the Buddha’s teachings. During his lifetime, Buddha Śākyamuni taught on countless occasions, on many different levels, and to different individuals, in order to help each particular person understand something that would bring him or her closer to enlightenment. For us to consider the vast scope of these teachings is as mind-blowing and awe-inspiring as gazing into the immensity of space.

In the Sūtrālaṃkāra, the Buddha’s regent, Maitreya, brings this vast array of teachings together, arranging them in an orderly fashion and putting them into perspective so that we can begin to understand them and use them as a path to enlightenment. Of the three principal aspects of the path—view, meditation, and conduct—this text, like Shantideva’s The Way of the Bodhisattva (Bodhicaryāvatāra), deals mainly with the view and conduct of the great bodhisattvas, whose sole aim is the enlightenment of all beings. Once we have an inkling of the extraordinary kindness and wisdom of these bodhisattvas, whom we can meet even today as our teachers, we can begin to infer that the incredible qualities and deeds that Maitreya describes are possible.

I hope that this translation of Maitreya’s presentation, along with Mipham Rinpoche’s clear explanation, will help readers to gain a glimpse of the Buddha’s message in all its vastness, taking them beyond limited conceptions and inspiring them to practice the path it describes.
 
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A magnificent Mahayana sutra, the Ratnamegha - Jewel Cloud was recently translated into English. It is a detailed primer for aspirants to the Mahayana path of bodhisattvas. One can read it online or download a pdf or e-pub or Kindle version:

84000 Reading Room | The Jewel Cloud
 
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Verses in praise of Buddha, from the Jewel Cloud Sutra:

“Born at the perfect site, the garden of Lumbinī,
He has no equal, not being subject to any affliction—
Here we have arrived at this most excellent mountain
To worship the one who is equal to space.

“At the tree of awakening he gained perfect awakening,
Crushed the power of the māras, and became a buddha—
Here we have arrived at this most excellent mountain
To worship the one who is stainless and splendid.

“All phenomena he realizes
To be like an illusion, a visual distortion, and a reflection of the moon in water—
Here we have arrived at this most excellent mountain
To worship this finest field of merit.

“All the different phenomena he realizes
To be like rainbows, or a dancer’s mask—
Here we have arrived at this most excellent mountain
To worship the treasure of immutable merit.

“Throughout many hundreds of eons he has perfected
The accumulations by means of his compassionate mind—
Here we have arrived at this most excellent mountain
To worship the one whose face is like a stainless moon.
 
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“Noble son, bodhisattvas endowed with ten qualities have knowledge of the
world. What are those ten? They are humility toward the haughty, no pride
when facing the proud, honesty toward the deceitful, truthfulness toward liars,
gentle words toward unskilled speakers, loving words toward the vicious,
patience toward the aggressive, love toward the brutal, compassion toward the
suffering, and sharing when meeting the stingy. Noble son, bodhisattvas who
possess these ten such qualities have knowledge of the world."

From the Jewel Cloud Sutra.
 

zaangalewa

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“Noble son, bodhisattvas endowed with ten qualities have knowledge of the
world. What are those ten? They are humility toward the haughty, no pride
when facing the proud, honesty toward the deceitful, truthfulness toward liars,
gentle words toward unskilled speakers, loving words toward the vicious,
patience toward the aggressive, love toward the brutal, compassion toward the
suffering, and sharing when meeting the stingy. Noble son, bodhisattvas who
possess these ten such qualities have knowledge of the world."

From the Jewel Cloud Sutra.
Enlightenment is man's emergence from his self-imposed nonage. Nonage is the inability to use one's own understanding without another's guidance. This nonage is self-imposed if its cause lies not in lack of understanding but in indecision and lack of courage to use one's own mind without another's guidance. Dare to know! (Sapere aude.) "Have the courage to use your own understanding," is therefore the motto of the enlightenment.

Laziness and cowardice are the reasons why such a large part of mankind gladly remain minors all their lives, long after nature has freed them from external guidance. They are the reasons why it is so easy for others to set themselves up as guardians. It is so comfortable to be a minor. If I have a book that thinks for me, a pastor who acts as my conscience, a physician who prescribes my diet, and so on--then I have no need to exert myself. I have no need to think, if only I can pay; others will take care of that disagreeable business for me. Those guardians who have kindly taken supervision upon themselves see to it that the overwhelming majority of mankind--among them the entire fair sex--should consider the step to maturity, not only as hard, but as extremely dangerous. First, these guardians make their domestic cattle stupid and carefully prevent the docile creatures from taking a single step without the leading-strings to which they have fastened them. Then they show them the danger that would threaten them if they should try to walk by themselves. Now this danger is really not very great; after stumbling a few times they would, at last, learn to walk. However, examples of such failures intimidate and generally discourage all further attempts.

Thus it is very difficult for the individual to work himself out of the nonage which has become almost second nature to him. He has even grown to like it, and is at first really incapable of using his own understanding because he has never been permitted to try it. Dogmas and formulas, these mechanical tools designed for reasonable use--or rather abuse--of his natural gifts, are the fetters of an everlasting nonage. The man who casts them off would make an uncertain leap over the narrowest ditch, because he is not used to such free movement. That is why there are only a few men who walk firmly, and who have emerged from nonage by cultivating their own minds.

It is more nearly possible, however, for the public to enlighten itself; indeed, if it is only given freedom, enlightenment is almost inevitable. There will always be a few independent thinkers, even among the self-appointed guardians of the multitude. Once such men have thrown off the yoke of nonage, they will spread about them the spirit of a reasonable appreciation of man's value and of his duty to think for himself. It is especially to be noted that the public which was earlier brought under the yoke by these men afterwards forces these very guardians to remain in submission, if it is so incited by some of its guardians who are themselves incapable of any enlightenment. That shows how pernicious it is to implant prejudices: they will eventually revenge themselves upon their authors or their authors' descendants. Therefore, a public can achieve enlightenment only slowly. A revolution may bring about the end of a personal despotism or of avaricious tyrannical oppression, but never a true reform of modes of thought. New prejudices will serve, in place of the old, as guide lines for the unthinking multitude.

This enlightenment requires nothing but freedom--and the most innocent of all that may be called "freedom": freedom to make public use of one's reason in all matters. Now I hear the cry from all sides: "Do not argue!" The officer says: "Do not argue--drill!" The tax collector: "Do not argue--pay!" The pastor: "Do not argue--believe!" Only one ruler in the world says: "Argue as much as you please, but obey!" We find restrictions on freedom everywhere. But which restriction is harmful to enlightenment? Which restriction is innocent, and which advances enlightenment? I reply: the public use of one's reason must be free at all times, and this alone can bring enlightenment to mankind.

Immanuel Kant, 1784

 

emilynghiem

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You need to explain why we should be interested in your religion, not just tell us where to read up on it.
Dear Blackrook
In keeping with the commandment to love God with all our heart mind and souls.
Buddhism focuses on disciplining the mind to let go so we can receive wisdom and understanding.

The two main principles in Buddhism, that all other teachings are based upon:
* Developing perfect Wisdom
* Developing perfect Compassion

So these are secular equivalents of the Two Great Commandments all the laws and prophets stem from
* loving GOD with all our heart mind and soul
* loving our neighbor as ourselves
which Jesus fulfills as joining the love of God with the love of Man by giving us a New Commandment
* loving one another as Christ Jesus loves us

Jesus fulfills and governs the laws of the CHURCHED fold under Scriptural laws and authority (Jews Christians Muslims etc. by the Bible)
equally as the
NATURAL laws of the secular Gentiles

So when addressing Jews Christians Muslims and other people by the Book, we cite those laws among fellow believers to enforce
common principles and to rebuke, check and prevent abuses.

And when addressing secular gentiles and nontheists, it helps to cite secular and natural laws to establish agreed truth and correct error.

Buddhism focuses on INTERNAL spiritual awareness in understanding the causes of conflicts, struggles and suffering in a rational manner.

While Christianity focuses on developing forgiveness and charity to restore relations with others
by unconditional love and grace.

Both are necessary to develop in order to fulfill the
Two Great Commandments of loving God and loving our neighbor,
which combined mean loving our neighbor UNCONDITIONALLY as Christ Jesus embodying God's perfect love.

We cannot receive this level of love if we first do not forgive
and let go of our mental attachments that limit us spiritually.

Buddhism, especially the practice of meditation to focus the mind
inward to find answers to the cause of problems, helps with this spiritual process.
 

xband

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You need to explain why we should be interested in your religion, not just tell us where to read up on it.
Dear Blackrook
In keeping with the commandment to love God with all our heart mind and souls.
Buddhism focuses on disciplining the mind to let go so we can receive wisdom and understanding.

The two main principles in Buddhism, that all other teachings are based upon:
* Developing perfect Wisdom
* Developing perfect Compassion

So these are secular equivalents of the Two Great Commandments all the laws and prophets stem from
* loving GOD with all our heart mind and soul
* loving our neighbor as ourselves
which Jesus fulfills as joining the love of God with the love of Man by giving us a New Commandment
* loving one another as Christ Jesus loves us

Jesus fulfills and governs the laws of the CHURCHED fold under Scriptural laws and authority (Jews Christians Muslims etc. by the Bible)
equally as the
NATURAL laws of the secular Gentiles

So when addressing Jews Christians Muslims and other people by the Book, we cite those laws among fellow believers to enforce
common principles and to rebuke, check and prevent abuses.

And when addressing secular gentiles and nontheists, it helps to cite secular and natural laws to establish agreed truth and correct error.

Buddhism focuses on INTERNAL spiritual awareness in understanding the causes of conflicts, struggles and suffering in a rational manner.

While Christianity focuses on developing forgiveness and charity to restore relations with others
by unconditional love and grace.

Both are necessary to develop in order to fulfill the
Two Great Commandments of loving God and loving our neighbor,
which combined mean loving our neighbor UNCONDITIONALLY as Christ Jesus embodying God's perfect love.

We cannot receive this level of love if we first do not forgive
and let go of our mental attachments that limit us spiritually.

Buddhism, especially the practice of meditation to focus the mind
inward to find answers to the cause of problems, helps with this spiritual process.
I went to one Buddha Ceremony in San Diego with a promise of free drugs and sex after the ceremony. I played along with them but the service never ended so I gave up on that idea. Omm, omm and more omm endlessly.
 

Picaro

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Buddhism is a dead end; it's just the idea of developing narcissism to its ultimate extremes, hence its appeal to Burb Brats and the like.

Sanskrit, however, is a language I always wanted to learn, but never got around to studying.
 

zaangalewa

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Buddhism is a dead end; it's just the idea of developing narcissism to its ultimate extremes, hence its appeal to Burb Brats and the like.
And I needed years not to understand what buddhism is.

Sanskrit, however, is a language I always wanted to learn, but never got around to studying.
Sanskrit "bhu"
German "bin"
English "be"

Take a bumble before and you have a bhramara. By mutations the bramara will become a brahman - and your teacher of the old indian language sanskrit is ready, steady, bumble bee.


PS: It exist by the way 49 words in sanskrit for the German word "Biene" (english word: "bee"). An interesting question is in this context what "to be" (German "sein" = existence) has to do with busy bees - and why we kill worldwide bees and other insects with our laziness.
 
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zaangalewa

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You need to explain why we should be interested in your religion, not just tell us where to read up on it.
Dear Blackrook
In keeping with the commandment to love God with all our heart mind and souls.
Buddhism focuses on disciplining the mind to let go so we can receive wisdom and understanding.

The two main principles in Buddhism, that all other teachings are based upon:
* Developing perfect Wisdom
* Developing perfect Compassion

So these are secular equivalents of the Two Great Commandments all the laws and prophets stem from
* loving GOD with all our heart mind and soul
* loving our neighbor as ourselves
which Jesus fulfills as joining the love of God with the love of Man by giving us a New Commandment
* loving one another as Christ Jesus loves us

Jesus fulfills and governs the laws of the CHURCHED fold under Scriptural laws and authority (Jews Christians Muslims etc. by the Bible)
equally as the
NATURAL laws of the secular Gentiles

So when addressing Jews Christians Muslims and other people by the Book, we cite those laws among fellow believers to enforce
common principles and to rebuke, check and prevent abuses.

And when addressing secular gentiles and nontheists, it helps to cite secular and natural laws to establish agreed truth and correct error.

Buddhism focuses on INTERNAL spiritual awareness in understanding the causes of conflicts, struggles and suffering in a rational manner.

While Christianity focuses on developing forgiveness and charity to restore relations with others
by unconditional love and grace.

Both are necessary to develop in order to fulfill the
Two Great Commandments of loving God and loving our neighbor,
which combined mean loving our neighbor UNCONDITIONALLY as Christ Jesus embodying God's perfect love.

We cannot receive this level of love if we first do not forgive
and let go of our mental attachments that limit us spiritually.

Buddhism, especially the practice of meditation to focus the mind
inward to find answers to the cause of problems, helps with this spiritual process.
I went to one Buddha Ceremony in San Diego with a promise of free drugs and sex after the ceremony. I played along with them but the service never ended so I gave up on that idea. Omm, omm and more omm endlessly.
5 rules for all buddhists:
  1. To abstain from taking life
  2. To abstain from taking what is not given
  3. To abstain from sensuous misconduct
  4. To abstain from false speech
  5. To abstain from intoxicants as tending to cloud the mind
So to expect "free drugs" has absolutelly nothing to do with buddhism. Buddhists do not use alcohol and/or drugs. Buddhists love a clear mind. Sure a buddhist is able to drink a beer for example - and sure also a drug addict is able to be buddhist and should really not be shy to become a buddhist - but this has nothing to do with the final way to enligthenment. Enlightenment is not drunken.

 
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In chapter 18 of the Golden Light Sutra Buddha tells of his past lifetime when he gave his body to a starving tigress. At the end of the chapter he mentions the karmic ties of the major persons involved:

I, the Tathagata Shakyamuni was formerly Mahasattva, Son of King Maharatha who made the tigress well.

Shuddhodana, the great king was the king called Maharatha, and Queen Maya was the sublime queen. Mahapranada became Maitreya. Likewise, Prince Mahadeva was the youthful Manjushri. The tigress was Mahaprajapati; the five bhikshus were her five cubs.

When Mahasattva gave the tigress his body, he made this altruistic wish: “By the merit of completely giving my body, may I, in future times for eons utterly beyond thought, perform the deeds of buddhas for sentient beings.”
 

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