What's new
US Message Board - Political Discussion Forum

This is a sample guest message. Register a free account today to become a member! Once signed in, you'll be able to participate on this site by adding your own topics and posts, as well as connect with other members through your own private inbox!

Is This Racist?

George Costanza

A Friendly Liberal
Joined
Mar 10, 2009
Messages
5,188
Reaction score
1,160
Points
155
Location
Los Angeles area.
Consider this hypothetical: An American-born and raised Hispanic person who speaks flawless English. If you were talking to this person over the phone, and did not otherwise know him/her, you would think you were talking to a caucasian who spoke perfect English without the slightest trace of an accent.

That is, until the person came to a word of Spanish or Mexican origin. Then, in speaking that word, they suddenly slip over into heavy, Hispanic pronunciation.

Here, in the Los Angeles area, there is a helicopter radio traffic person by the name of Jorge Jarrin. Jorge delivers his daily traffic messages without the slightest trace of accent until he comes to the names of streets with Spanish or Mexican origin. Then he suddenly becomes Senor Espana.

I see this a lot at work. The vast majority of the people in my office and in my court, are Hispanic. Not all of them do this, but many of them do.

I submit that this is racist. I am offended by it. I view it as saying: "I'm happy to speak your silly little language in the same way you do, but when it comes to words from my native country, let's never forget that I am from that country and you are not!" Quite often, the (Spanish origin) words are spoken in a clearly superior tone, with a clearly smug, superior attitude on the part of the speaker.

That's how I see it. How about you?
 

Liability

Locked Account.
Joined
Jun 28, 2009
Messages
35,447
Reaction score
5,178
Points
48
Location
Mansion in Ravi's Head
Consider this hypothetical: An American-born and raised Hispanic person who speaks flawless English. If you were talking to this person over the phone, and did not otherwise know him/her, you would think you were talking to a caucasian who spoke perfect English without the slightest trace of an accent.

That is, until the person came to a word of Spanish or Mexican origin. Then, in speaking that word, they suddenly slip over into heavy, Hispanic pronunciation.

Here, in the Los Angeles area, there is a helicopter radio traffic person by the name of Jorge Jarrin. Jorge delivers his daily traffic messages without the slightest trace of accent until he comes to the names of streets with Spanish or Mexican origin. Then he suddenly becomes Senor Espana.

I see this a lot at work. The vast majority of the people in my office and in my court, are Hispanic. Not all of them do this, but many of them do.

I submit that this is racist. I am offended by it. I view it as saying: "I'm happy to speak your silly little language in the same way you do, but when it comes to words from my native country, let's never forget that I am from that country and you are not!" Quite often, the (Spanish origin) words are spoken in a clearly superior tone, with a clearly smug, superior attitude on the part of the speaker.

That's how I see it. How about you?

"Huevos ranchero" sounds better when pronounced properly.
 

PLYMCO_PILGRIM

Gold Member
Joined
Jul 3, 2009
Messages
17,416
Reaction score
3,063
Points
183
Location
America's Home Town
Consider this hypothetical: An American-born and raised Hispanic person who speaks flawless English. If you were talking to this person over the phone, and did not otherwise know him/her, you would think you were talking to a caucasian who spoke perfect English without the slightest trace of an accent.

That is, until the person came to a word of Spanish or Mexican origin. Then, in speaking that word, they suddenly slip over into heavy, Hispanic pronunciation.

Here, in the Los Angeles area, there is a helicopter radio traffic person by the name of Jorge Jarrin. Jorge delivers his daily traffic messages without the slightest trace of accent until he comes to the names of streets with Spanish or Mexican origin. Then he suddenly becomes Senor Espana.

I see this a lot at work. The vast majority of the people in my office and in my court, are Hispanic. Not all of them do this, but many of them do.

I submit that this is racist. I am offended by it. I view it as saying: "I'm happy to speak your silly little language in the same way you do, but when it comes to words from my native country, let's never forget that I am from that country and you are not!" Quite often, the (Spanish origin) words are spoken in a clearly superior tone, with a clearly smug, superior attitude on the part of the speaker.

That's how I see it. How about you?

Nah dude its just having pride in one's heritage.

I think your being over sensitive to it on this particular issue.


Although there is this comcast ad that peeves me for some reason...let me find it.....if the ad was run in a spanish speaking country I wouldn't care but I dunno it feels weird seeing it in my living room

 
Last edited by a moderator:

toxicmedia

Gold Member
Joined
Jul 5, 2011
Messages
5,569
Reaction score
873
Points
245
Location
Northern California
Consider this hypothetical: An American-born and raised Hispanic person who speaks flawless English. If you were talking to this person over the phone, and did not otherwise know him/her, you would think you were talking to a caucasian who spoke perfect English without the slightest trace of an accent.

That is, until the person came to a word of Spanish or Mexican origin. Then, in speaking that word, they suddenly slip over into heavy, Hispanic pronunciation.

Here, in the Los Angeles area, there is a helicopter radio traffic person by the name of Jorge Jarrin. Jorge delivers his daily traffic messages without the slightest trace of accent until he comes to the names of streets with Spanish or Mexican origin. Then he suddenly becomes Senor Espana.

I see this a lot at work. The vast majority of the people in my office and in my court, are Hispanic. Not all of them do this, but many of them do.

I submit that this is racist. I am offended by it. I view it as saying: "I'm happy to speak your silly little language in the same way you do, but when it comes to words from my native country, let's never forget that I am from that country and you are not!" Quite often, the (Spanish origin) words are spoken in a clearly superior tone, with a clearly smug, superior attitude on the part of the speaker.

That's how I see it. How about you?
The definition of "racism" is a belief in the superiority or inferiority of one race of homo sapiens over another.

This isn't racism.

However....everybody sounds, and feels, more confident speaking thier primary language.

I think you may be reading more into this than there is....and I wouldn't even let it bother me if he was trying to imply the superiority of Spanglish.
 

Sovereign_F

Newbie
Joined
Oct 13, 2011
Messages
23
Reaction score
8
Points
1
Location
Ankh-Morpork
I speak fluent Italian. Speaking the Italian language in the same way as an English person, who is new to the language, would would make me sound like a retard to anyone who spoke Italian - this includes my mother and grandmother.

Why should I pronounce things in a way which would feel weird to me and make me sound like a dumb idiot to my family?

You're wrong. Get over it.
 

Zoom-boing

Platinum Member
Joined
Oct 30, 2008
Messages
25,764
Reaction score
7,803
Points
350
Location
East Japip
No, it's not racist at all. They 'slip back into it' because they are pronouncing the words correctly. You should hear how I butchered an order for something Mexican at Applebees once (can't remember what it was but it had several Mexican ingredients that I could choose from). lol, even I was embarrassed at how poorly I pronounced the items!

Ever watch Dexter? The Captain and one of the detectives are both Hispanic and they speak exactly as the reporter you described . . . no trace of accent until certain Hispanic words are said. It's not a big deal and certainly not racist.
 

Quantum Windbag

Gold Member
Joined
May 9, 2010
Messages
58,308
Reaction score
5,093
Points
245
Consider this hypothetical: An American-born and raised Hispanic person who speaks flawless English. If you were talking to this person over the phone, and did not otherwise know him/her, you would think you were talking to a caucasian who spoke perfect English without the slightest trace of an accent.

That is, until the person came to a word of Spanish or Mexican origin. Then, in speaking that word, they suddenly slip over into heavy, Hispanic pronunciation.

Here, in the Los Angeles area, there is a helicopter radio traffic person by the name of Jorge Jarrin. Jorge delivers his daily traffic messages without the slightest trace of accent until he comes to the names of streets with Spanish or Mexican origin. Then he suddenly becomes Senor Espana.

I see this a lot at work. The vast majority of the people in my office and in my court, are Hispanic. Not all of them do this, but many of them do.

I submit that this is racist. I am offended by it. I view it as saying: "I'm happy to speak your silly little language in the same way you do, but when it comes to words from my native country, let's never forget that I am from that country and you are not!" Quite often, the (Spanish origin) words are spoken in a clearly superior tone, with a clearly smug, superior attitude on the part of the speaker.

That's how I see it. How about you?

No.
 

earlycuyler

Extra long Bad Ass Cut.
Joined
Sep 17, 2011
Messages
6,689
Reaction score
1,237
Points
163
Location
Drivers seat.
Consider this hypothetical: An American-born and raised Hispanic person who speaks flawless English. If you were talking to this person over the phone, and did not otherwise know him/her, you would think you were talking to a caucasian who spoke perfect English without the slightest trace of an accent.

That is, until the person came to a word of Spanish or Mexican origin. Then, in speaking that word, they suddenly slip over into heavy, Hispanic pronunciation.

Here, in the Los Angeles area, there is a helicopter radio traffic person by the name of Jorge Jarrin. Jorge delivers his daily traffic messages without the slightest trace of accent until he comes to the names of streets with Spanish or Mexican origin. Then he suddenly becomes Senor Espana.

I see this a lot at work. The vast majority of the people in my office and in my court, are Hispanic. Not all of them do this, but many of them do.

I submit that this is racist. I am offended by it. I view it as saying: "I'm happy to speak your silly little language in the same way you do, but when it comes to words from my native country, let's never forget that I am from that country and you are not!" Quite often, the (Spanish origin) words are spoken in a clearly superior tone, with a clearly smug, superior attitude on the part of the speaker.

That's how I see it. How about you?

Until recently, I spent a good deal of time on the border. The white folks do the same thing to. Does not bother me at all.
 

syrenn

Rookie
Joined
May 10, 2010
Messages
47,839
Reaction score
11,196
Points
0
Consider this hypothetical: An American-born and raised Hispanic person who speaks flawless English. If you were talking to this person over the phone, and did not otherwise know him/her, you would think you were talking to a caucasian who spoke perfect English without the slightest trace of an accent.

That is, until the person came to a word of Spanish or Mexican origin. Then, in speaking that word, they suddenly slip over into heavy, Hispanic pronunciation.

Here, in the Los Angeles area, there is a helicopter radio traffic person by the name of Jorge Jarrin. Jorge delivers his daily traffic messages without the slightest trace of accent until he comes to the names of streets with Spanish or Mexican origin. Then he suddenly becomes Senor Espana.

I see this a lot at work. The vast majority of the people in my office and in my court, are Hispanic. Not all of them do this, but many of them do.

I submit that this is racist. I am offended by it. I view it as saying: "I'm happy to speak your silly little language in the same way you do, but when it comes to words from my native country, let's never forget that I am from that country and you are not!" Quite often, the (Spanish origin) words are spoken in a clearly superior tone, with a clearly smug, superior attitude on the part of the speaker.

That's how I see it. How about you?


That is how i see it too.

If you have not picked up on it yet George.... the lations are very racist.
 

jillian

Princess
Joined
Apr 4, 2006
Messages
85,005
Reaction score
17,084
Points
2,220
Location
The Other Side of Paradise
Consider this hypothetical: An American-born and raised Hispanic person who speaks flawless English. If you were talking to this person over the phone, and did not otherwise know him/her, you would think you were talking to a caucasian who spoke perfect English without the slightest trace of an accent.

That is, until the person came to a word of Spanish or Mexican origin. Then, in speaking that word, they suddenly slip over into heavy, Hispanic pronunciation.

Here, in the Los Angeles area, there is a helicopter radio traffic person by the name of Jorge Jarrin. Jorge delivers his daily traffic messages without the slightest trace of accent until he comes to the names of streets with Spanish or Mexican origin. Then he suddenly becomes Senor Espana.

I see this a lot at work. The vast majority of the people in my office and in my court, are Hispanic. Not all of them do this, but many of them do.

I submit that this is racist. I am offended by it. I view it as saying: "I'm happy to speak your silly little language in the same way you do, but when it comes to words from my native country, let's never forget that I am from that country and you are not!" Quite often, the (Spanish origin) words are spoken in a clearly superior tone, with a clearly smug, superior attitude on the part of the speaker.

That's how I see it. How about you?
The definition of "racism" is a belief in the superiority or inferiority of one race of homo sapiens over another.

This isn't racism.

However....everybody sounds, and feels, more confident speaking thier primary language.

I think you may be reading more into this than there is....and I wouldn't even let it bother me if he was trying to imply the superiority of Spanglish.

no. that isn't all that racism is. racism is hatred of members of a particular group regardless of the merits of the individual.

that said... i don't have a problem with people pronouncing things properly. they probably grew up hearing/saying the words spoken with spanish inflection.
 

Montrovant

Fuzzy bears!
Joined
May 4, 2009
Messages
21,931
Reaction score
4,913
Points
290
Location
A Picturesque Apocalypse
No, I don't think this is racist.

However, I hate it when people use an accent on certain words, but it is not an accent of a language they know or have been particularly exposed to! I have a friend who says ricotta as though he wants to be speaking Italian, but as far as I know there's no Italian in his family. :) Actually, thinking on it, I don't know if there's any other words that he accents....for some reason that has always bothered the hell out of me! :lol:
 

Unkotare

Diamond Member
Joined
Aug 16, 2011
Messages
100,541
Reaction score
13,127
Points
2,180
Consider this hypothetical: An American-born and raised Hispanic person who speaks flawless English. If you were talking to this person over the phone, and did not otherwise know him/her, you would think you were talking to a caucasian who spoke perfect English without the slightest trace of an accent.

That is, until the person came to a word of Spanish or Mexican origin. Then, in speaking that word, they suddenly slip over into heavy, Hispanic pronunciation.

Here, in the Los Angeles area, there is a helicopter radio traffic person by the name of Jorge Jarrin. Jorge delivers his daily traffic messages without the slightest trace of accent until he comes to the names of streets with Spanish or Mexican origin. Then he suddenly becomes Senor Espana.

I see this a lot at work. The vast majority of the people in my office and in my court, are Hispanic. Not all of them do this, but many of them do.

I submit that this is racist. I am offended by it. I view it as saying: "I'm happy to speak your silly little language in the same way you do, but when it comes to words from my native country, let's never forget that I am from that country and you are not!" Quite often, the (Spanish origin) words are spoken in a clearly superior tone, with a clearly smug, superior attitude on the part of the speaker.

That's how I see it. How about you?


You're an idiot.
 

Sherry

You're not the boss of me
Joined
Mar 28, 2009
Messages
21,819
Reaction score
11,545
Points
960
Location
some beach
No, I don't think this is racist.

However, I hate it when people use an accent on certain words, but it is not an accent of a language they know or have been particularly exposed to! I have a friend who says ricotta as though he wants to be speaking Italian, but as far as I know there's no Italian in his family. :) Actually, thinking on it, I don't know if there's any other words that he accents....for some reason that has always bothered the hell out of me! :lol:

:lmao:

[ame=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xjXXkBrGnd4]Brian Regan on Italians and Irish - YouTube[/ame]
 

Samson

Póg Mo Thóin
Joined
Dec 3, 2009
Messages
27,332
Reaction score
4,233
Points
245
Location
A Higher Plain
Consider this hypothetical: An American-born and raised Hispanic person who speaks flawless English. If you were talking to this person over the phone, and did not otherwise know him/her, you would think you were talking to a caucasian who spoke perfect English without the slightest trace of an accent.

That is, until the person came to a word of Spanish or Mexican origin. Then, in speaking that word, they suddenly slip over into heavy, Hispanic pronunciation.

Here, in the Los Angeles area, there is a helicopter radio traffic person by the name of Jorge Jarrin. Jorge delivers his daily traffic messages without the slightest trace of accent until he comes to the names of streets with Spanish or Mexican origin. Then he suddenly becomes Senor Espana.

I see this a lot at work. The vast majority of the people in my office and in my court, are Hispanic. Not all of them do this, but many of them do.

I submit that this is racist. I am offended by it. I view it as saying: "I'm happy to speak your silly little language in the same way you do, but when it comes to words from my native country, let's never forget that I am from that country and you are not!" Quite often, the (Spanish origin) words are spoken in a clearly superior tone, with a clearly smug, superior attitude on the part of the speaker.

That's how I see it. How about you?

Your OP has a clearly smug and clearly superior tone.
 

skipper

VIP Member
Joined
Sep 10, 2011
Messages
504
Reaction score
114
Points
78
Location
Gabrielino-Tongva Wetlands
Consider this hypothetical: An American-born and raised Hispanic person who speaks flawless English. If you were talking to this person over the phone, and did not otherwise know him/her, you would think you were talking to a caucasian who spoke perfect English without the slightest trace of an accent.

That is, until the person came to a word of Spanish or Mexican origin. Then, in speaking that word, they suddenly slip over into heavy, Hispanic pronunciation.

Here, in the Los Angeles area, there is a helicopter radio traffic person by the name of Jorge Jarrin. Jorge delivers his daily traffic messages without the slightest trace of accent until he comes to the names of streets with Spanish or Mexican origin. Then he suddenly becomes Senor Espana.

I see this a lot at work. The vast majority of the people in my office and in my court, are Hispanic. Not all of them do this, but many of them do.

I submit that this is racist. I am offended by it. I view it as saying: "I'm happy to speak your silly little language in the same way you do, but when it comes to words from my native country, let's never forget that I am from that country and you are not!" Quite often, the (Spanish origin) words are spoken in a clearly superior tone, with a clearly smug, superior attitude on the part of the speaker.

That's how I see it. How about you?

No, I don't think it's racist at all. I think it comes natural to pronounce the Spanish origin
names that way, the way it was pronounced in the home. His dad was the LA Dodgers Spanish broadcaster for a long time, BTW.
 

Big Black Dog

Platinum Member
Joined
May 20, 2009
Messages
23,406
Reaction score
8,012
Points
890
I hate going to Wal-Mart or just about anywhere else and hear all the Spanish being spoken. This is America. Speak English.
 

Samson

Póg Mo Thóin
Joined
Dec 3, 2009
Messages
27,332
Reaction score
4,233
Points
245
Location
A Higher Plain
I hate going to Wal-Mart or just about anywhere else and hear all the Spanish being spoken. This is America. Speak English.

I might remind you of a little thing called, "Freedom of Speech."

I think its part of a little thing called, "The US Constitutuion."

:razz:
 

USMB Server Goals

Total amount
$280.00
Goal
$350.00

Most reactions - Past 7 days

Forum List

Top