Is God subject to his own commandments?

Delta4Embassy

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In the Jewish story, "Mother and Nest" a Jewish boy whose father and mother have both died pleads with God to return his beloved father to life quoting Torah's commandment about not orphaning birds taking both their parents away. You can take one or the other, but not both it says. Citing this to God in the boys' prayer, God agrees and returns the boy's father to life even remarking what a wise and learned boy he is. Can read it in full here with relevant chapter and verse:

Mother and Nest - Life s Passages - Parsha

While I no longer believe in gods, since many say they do, thought this would make a worthwhile thread asking the question.
 

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In the Jewish story, "Mother and Nest" a Jewish boy whose father and mother have both died pleads with God to return his beloved father to life quoting Torah's commandment about not orphaning birds taking both their parents away. You can take one or the other, but not both it says. Citing this to God in the boys' prayer, God agrees and returns the boy's father to life even remarking what a wise and learned boy he is. Can read it in full here with relevant chapter and verse:

Mother and Nest - Life s Passages - Parsha

While I no longer believe in gods, since many say they do, thought this would make a worthwhile thread asking the question.
I suspect, if there is a God, that S/He would act much like the Congress of the United States. Make laws for others, but exempt him or her self from them.
 
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Delta4Embassy

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Relevant passage,

"In the room where the departed lay, the son would not allow anyone near his father's body. He laid his head close to his father's and wept bitterly and uncontrollably. Looking heavenward, he declared:

"Master of the Universe, You wrote in your holy Torah these words:

"'If you chance upon a bird's nest, in any tree or on the ground, with fledglings or eggs, and the mother is sitting over the fledglings or on the eggs, do not take the mother together with her young. Let the mother go and take only the young...'

"Master of the Universe! According to your holy Torah, we must let the mother live, and surely we must not take the mother and leave the children unattended.

"You, G-d, must fulfill the words of Your holy Torah. My sister and I are two little birds. My mother has died, and so our father has taken her place to care for us.

"According to Your Torah, dear G-d, You may take either me or my sister, but You may not take away my beloved father!"

Hearing the poignant plea of this innocent child, Rabbi Elazar's colleagues began to weep.

Suddenly, the room became silent, as a pillar of fire appeared, hovering over the bed of the departed. Everyone in the room ran out, and Rabbi Elazar's frightened colleagues wanted to do the same.

Rabbi Elazar calmed them, saying, "A great miracle is about to occur."

Out of the fiery pillar, a heavenly voice sounded: "Fortunate are you, Rabbi Yosi, to merit such a wise son whose justified complaints split the gates of heaven, ascending before G-d's Throne of Glory.

"A new verdict has been passed. You, Rabbi Yosi, will live twenty-two more years, in order to have the privilege of teaching this wise child."

Then, as suddenly as it had descended, the pillar disappeared, as Rabbi Yosi's eyes fluttered open.

Rabbi Elazar exclaimed to his friends, "How fortunate are we to have witnessed with our own eyes the miracle of the dead coming to life!"

Rabbi Elazar then blessed Rabbi Yosi, "How fortunate are you to have experienced the miracle of the resurrection of the dead because of the wisdom of your young son!"

Meanwhile, the young child had fainted from the overwhelming events. When he awoke, it was impossible for him to fully express his elation, as he smothered his father with hugs and kisses.

Rabbi Elazar remained for three days to celebrate. During this time, he asked Rabbi Yosi to describe what he had observed in the heavens.

Rabbi Yosi replied, "I may not disclose to human ears what I have seen. I can only reveal that when my son was pleading, weeping and protesting to G-d from the depths of his being with utter sincerity, and he referred to the mitzvah of sending the mother bird away, three-hundred thousand heavenly chairs shook, as three-hundred thousand tzaddikim (righteous individuals) stood up in the heavens, begging G-d to return me to the living!""

- The Zohar (Jewish text about Kabbalah)
 
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Delta4Embassy

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In the Jewish story, "Mother and Nest" a Jewish boy whose father and mother have both died pleads with God to return his beloved father to life quoting Torah's commandment about not orphaning birds taking both their parents away. You can take one or the other, but not both it says. Citing this to God in the boys' prayer, God agrees and returns the boy's father to life even remarking what a wise and learned boy he is. Can read it in full here with relevant chapter and verse:

Mother and Nest - Life s Passages - Parsha

While I no longer believe in gods, since many say they do, thought this would make a worthwhile thread asking the question.
I suspect, if there is a God, that S/He would act much like the Congress of the United States. Make laws for others, but exempt him or her self from them.
Kinda anthropomorphisizing God that. What we might suspect, and what's in official 'canonized' texts are two very different things. According to this story, God is bound to His own Torah and commandments.
 

Wry Catcher

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In the Jewish story, "Mother and Nest" a Jewish boy whose father and mother have both died pleads with God to return his beloved father to life quoting Torah's commandment about not orphaning birds taking both their parents away. You can take one or the other, but not both it says. Citing this to God in the boys' prayer, God agrees and returns the boy's father to life even remarking what a wise and learned boy he is. Can read it in full here with relevant chapter and verse:

Mother and Nest - Life s Passages - Parsha

While I no longer believe in gods, since many say they do, thought this would make a worthwhile thread asking the question.
I suspect, if there is a God, that S/He would act much like the Congress of the United States. Make laws for others, but exempt him or her self from them.
Kinda anthropomorphisizing God that. What we might suspect, and what's in official 'canonized' texts are two very different things. According to this story, God is bound to His own Torah and commandments.
Sorry, I have trouble taking the issue of God seriously - mea culpa for being glib.
 
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Delta4Embassy

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In the Jewish story, "Mother and Nest" a Jewish boy whose father and mother have both died pleads with God to return his beloved father to life quoting Torah's commandment about not orphaning birds taking both their parents away. You can take one or the other, but not both it says. Citing this to God in the boys' prayer, God agrees and returns the boy's father to life even remarking what a wise and learned boy he is. Can read it in full here with relevant chapter and verse:

Mother and Nest - Life s Passages - Parsha

While I no longer believe in gods, since many say they do, thought this would make a worthwhile thread asking the question.
I suspect, if there is a God, that S/He would act much like the Congress of the United States. Make laws for others, but exempt him or her self from them.
Kinda anthropomorphisizing God that. What we might suspect, and what's in official 'canonized' texts are two very different things. According to this story, God is bound to His own Torah and commandments.
Sorry, I have trouble taking the issue of God seriously - mea culpa for being glib.
No problem for being glib. Just that in this instance there's official text to look at. No more serious to me than talking about the "Twilight" novel :)

Reason to even bother asking the question is many seem to give God a pass for the things in their religious texts as with killing and such. So is God exempt from his own 6th commandment "you shall not murder?" What's the Great Flood if not planetary-scale murder?
 

onefour1

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God is subject to those laws of his which are eternal in nature or apply to the eternities. He is not subject to laws which only apply to this mortal condition. For example, in the eternities, resurrected beings can never die again. They are immortal. Therefore there is no death of the body and as such there is no murder. Thus the commandment, thou shalt not kill is a commandment given by God for our benefit while on this earth. God will at times destroy the wicked, allow pain, suffering, and death to occur in this life as lessons that teach us to be better beings in the eternities or to punish us for willfully turning against him.
 

Blackrook

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Ironic that an atheist Jew would post a fictional story about a boy bringing the dead back to life, and yet he rejects Jesus Christ, who actually made it happen.
 

Lipush

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In the Jewish story, "Mother and Nest" a Jewish boy whose father and mother have both died pleads with God to return his beloved father to life quoting Torah's commandment about not orphaning birds taking both their parents away. You can take one or the other, but not both it says. Citing this to God in the boys' prayer, God agrees and returns the boy's father to life even remarking what a wise and learned boy he is. Can read it in full here with relevant chapter and verse:

Mother and Nest - Life s Passages - Parsha

While I no longer believe in gods, since many say they do, thought this would make a worthwhile thread asking the question.
I find it interesting and questionable. While thay boy may be wise, isn't pleading with God to bring his father back is basically questioning God's intention to any individual?
 
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Delta4Embassy

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In the Jewish story, "Mother and Nest" a Jewish boy whose father and mother have both died pleads with God to return his beloved father to life quoting Torah's commandment about not orphaning birds taking both their parents away. You can take one or the other, but not both it says. Citing this to God in the boys' prayer, God agrees and returns the boy's father to life even remarking what a wise and learned boy he is. Can read it in full here with relevant chapter and verse:

Mother and Nest - Life s Passages - Parsha

While I no longer believe in gods, since many say they do, thought this would make a worthwhile thread asking the question.
I find it interesting and questionable. While thay boy may be wise, isn't pleading with God to bring his father back is basically questioning God's intention to any individual?
In this case, the mother'd already died previously. So if it's in Torah not to take both parents, you'd have to ask what plan involves ignoring your own laws.
 

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