Green Salvations Charade

Manonthestreet

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Demonizing his critics worked for Gordon for more than a decade, but in the end the NIMBY charge lost its sting when the public recognized Cape Wind as a classic bait and switch. Developers promised cheap, clean energy, and then planned to sell 77.5 percent of the power they were going to produce to NStar and National Grid for some two times the average cost of power generated by US suppliers. The contracted price of 18.7 cents per kilowatt-hour was slated to rise 3.5 percent every year of the 15-year contract. What really toppled Cape Wind rsquo s plans for Nantucket Sound - Magazine - The Boston Globe
 
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Manonthestreet

Manonthestreet

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and again ..... not nearly competitive
 

Old Rocks

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http://www.nytimes.com/2014/11/24/b...-win-on-price-vs-conventional-fuels.html?_r=0

In Texas, Austin Energy signed a deal this spring for 20 years of output from a solar farm at less than 5 cents a kilowatt-hour. In September, the Grand River Dam Authority in Oklahoma announced its approval of a new agreement to buy power from a new wind farm expected to be completed next year. Grand River estimated the deal would save its customers roughly $50 million from the project.

And, also in Oklahoma, American Electric Power ended up tripling the amount of wind power it had originally sought after seeing how low the bids came in last year.

“Wind was on sale — it was a Blue Light Special,” said Jay Godfrey, managing director of renewable energy for the company. He noted that Oklahoma, unlike many states, did not require utilities to buy power from renewable sources.

“We were doing it because it made sense for our ratepayers,” he said.

According to a study by the investment banking firm Lazard, the cost of utility-scale solar energy is as low as 5.6 cents a kilowatt-hour, and wind is as low as 1.4 cents. In comparison, natural gas comes at 6.1 cents a kilowatt-hour on the low end and coal at 6.6 cents. Without subsidies, the firm’s analysis shows, solar costs about 7.2 cents a kilowatt-hour at the low end, with wind at 3.7 cents.

Dirty coal, 6.6 cents a kilowatt, with depletion allowances (subsidies), wind, 3.7 cents a kilowatt without any subsidies. Solar, without any subsidies, within a half cent of dirty coal, and the price of solar is still rapidly declining. Clean coal? Not even in the ball park with solar and wind today.

Wind, solar, and geothermal will replace fossil fuels for the generation of power simply on the basis of economics. Good old market economy you guys are always talking about.
 

elektra

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http://www.nytimes.com/2014/11/24/b...-win-on-price-vs-conventional-fuels.html?_r=0

In Texas, Austin Energy signed a deal this spring for 20 years of output from a solar farm at less than 5 cents a kilowatt-hour. In September, the Grand River Dam Authority in Oklahoma announced its approval of a new agreement to buy power from a new wind farm expected to be completed next year. Grand River estimated the deal would save its customers roughly $50 million from the project.

And, also in Oklahoma, American Electric Power ended up tripling the amount of wind power it had originally sought after seeing how low the bids came in last year.

“Wind was on sale — it was a Blue Light Special,” said Jay Godfrey, managing director of renewable energy for the company. He noted that Oklahoma, unlike many states, did not require utilities to buy power from renewable sources.

“We were doing it because it made sense for our ratepayers,” he said.

According to a study by the investment banking firm Lazard, the cost of utility-scale solar energy is as low as 5.6 cents a kilowatt-hour, and wind is as low as 1.4 cents. In comparison, natural gas comes at 6.1 cents a kilowatt-hour on the low end and coal at 6.6 cents. Without subsidies, the firm’s analysis shows, solar costs about 7.2 cents a kilowatt-hour at the low end, with wind at 3.7 cents.

Dirty coal, 6.6 cents a kilowatt, with depletion allowances (subsidies), wind, 3.7 cents a kilowatt without any subsidies. Solar, without any subsidies, within a half cent of dirty coal, and the price of solar is still rapidly declining. Clean coal? Not even in the ball park with solar and wind today.

Wind, solar, and geothermal will replace fossil fuels for the generation of power simply on the basis of economics. Good old market economy you guys are always talking about.
another lie, why not start a geothermal thread, crock, so you can be the fool, even more so.
 

Old Rocks

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Austin Energy s new solar deal with Recurrent among cheapest ever signed - Austin Business Journal

Got Energy? Sign up for our Energy Inc. newsletter here.


Still, solar will remain a relatively small portion of Austin Energy's total generation — reflective of the overall market. At peak hours, Austin Energy has provided up to 2,714 MW of energy, though the utility is one of the nation's leaders in the percentage of power it generates from renewable sources.

One megawatt is enough power to for 100 homes and requires about four acres of solar farm to generate.

To meet the contract's needs, Recurrent will open its first solar facility in West Texas. At 150 MW, the site will be the state's largest. CEO Arno Harris estimated the new facility generation facility would span about 600 acres and begin operating in the fourth quarter of 2016.

Harris called the contract a watershed moment for the third generation of solar projects able to compete with other power sources.

"I think, finally, from a standpoint of solar, we're seeing the next wave of projects at this scale," he said. "It's the emergence of competitive solar power, and the emergence of solar as a major power generator."

Harris said that costs for solar have fallen by about 60 percent to 70 percent and are expected to fall further by the end of the decade.

Stay up to date on Texas energy news with the Energy Inc. news ticker, bringing you by-the-minute coverage from the Texas Business Journals.

Those darned ultra-liberal Texans.
 

RetiredGySgt

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Neither solar nor wind is steady and sure. One must maintain a fossil fuel or hydro power system as back up for them.
 

Old Rocks

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http://www.nytimes.com/2014/11/24/b...-win-on-price-vs-conventional-fuels.html?_r=0

In Texas, Austin Energy signed a deal this spring for 20 years of output from a solar farm at less than 5 cents a kilowatt-hour. In September, the Grand River Dam Authority in Oklahoma announced its approval of a new agreement to buy power from a new wind farm expected to be completed next year. Grand River estimated the deal would save its customers roughly $50 million from the project.

And, also in Oklahoma, American Electric Power ended up tripling the amount of wind power it had originally sought after seeing how low the bids came in last year.

“Wind was on sale — it was a Blue Light Special,” said Jay Godfrey, managing director of renewable energy for the company. He noted that Oklahoma, unlike many states, did not require utilities to buy power from renewable sources.

“We were doing it because it made sense for our ratepayers,” he said.

According to a study by the investment banking firm Lazard, the cost of utility-scale solar energy is as low as 5.6 cents a kilowatt-hour, and wind is as low as 1.4 cents. In comparison, natural gas comes at 6.1 cents a kilowatt-hour on the low end and coal at 6.6 cents. Without subsidies, the firm’s analysis shows, solar costs about 7.2 cents a kilowatt-hour at the low end, with wind at 3.7 cents.

Dirty coal, 6.6 cents a kilowatt, with depletion allowances (subsidies), wind, 3.7 cents a kilowatt without any subsidies. Solar, without any subsidies, within a half cent of dirty coal, and the price of solar is still rapidly declining. Clean coal? Not even in the ball park with solar and wind today.

Wind, solar, and geothermal will replace fossil fuels for the generation of power simply on the basis of economics. Good old market economy you guys are always talking about.
another lie, why not start a geothermal thread, crock, so you can be the fool, even more so.
You are getting silly and desperate there, old gal. Technology marches on, and leaves silly old fools in the dust.
 

elektra

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http://www.nytimes.com/2014/11/24/b...-win-on-price-vs-conventional-fuels.html?_r=0

In Texas, Austin Energy signed a deal this spring for 20 years of output from a solar farm at less than 5 cents a kilowatt-hour. In September, the Grand River Dam Authority in Oklahoma announced its approval of a new agreement to buy power from a new wind farm expected to be completed next year. Grand River estimated the deal would save its customers roughly $50 million from the project.

And, also in Oklahoma, American Electric Power ended up tripling the amount of wind power it had originally sought after seeing how low the bids came in last year.

“Wind was on sale — it was a Blue Light Special,” said Jay Godfrey, managing director of renewable energy for the company. He noted that Oklahoma, unlike many states, did not require utilities to buy power from renewable sources.

“We were doing it because it made sense for our ratepayers,” he said.

According to a study by the investment banking firm Lazard, the cost of utility-scale solar energy is as low as 5.6 cents a kilowatt-hour, and wind is as low as 1.4 cents. In comparison, natural gas comes at 6.1 cents a kilowatt-hour on the low end and coal at 6.6 cents. Without subsidies, the firm’s analysis shows, solar costs about 7.2 cents a kilowatt-hour at the low end, with wind at 3.7 cents.

Dirty coal, 6.6 cents a kilowatt, with depletion allowances (subsidies), wind, 3.7 cents a kilowatt without any subsidies. Solar, without any subsidies, within a half cent of dirty coal, and the price of solar is still rapidly declining. Clean coal? Not even in the ball park with solar and wind today.

Wind, solar, and geothermal will replace fossil fuels for the generation of power simply on the basis of economics. Good old market economy you guys are always talking about.
another lie, why not start a geothermal thread, crock, so you can be the fool, even more so.
You are getting silly and desperate there, old gal. Technology marches on, and leaves silly old fools in the dust.
And I see you have gotten tired of having your links show that you are wrong, wise to try and flame and troll, and not to discuss anything technical.
 

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