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Germany’s ‘Green’ Energy Failure

Doc7505

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Germany’s ‘Green’ Energy Failure:
Germany turns back to ‘dirty’ coal and natural gas as millions of its solar panels are blanketed in snow and ice
Germany’s ‘Green’ Energy Failure: Germany turns back to ‘dirty’ coal and natural gas as millions of its solar panels are blanketed in snow and ice | Tech News | Startups News (techstartups.com)
11 Feb 2021 ~~ By Nickie Louise

Energiewende is a German word for ‘”energy transition.” Energiewende is a policy launched by the German government in 2000 to decarbonize its primary energy supply. Depending on whom you ask, the program has been praised by many environmentalists and others called it a failure.
In 2000 when the program was first launched, 6.6 percent of Germany’s electricity came from renewable sources such as solar and wind. In 2019, almost two decades later, the share reached 41.1 percent. That’s where the good news end. In 2000, Germany had an installed capacity of 121 gigawatts with 577 terawatt-hours generated, which is 54 percent as much as it theoretically could have done (that is, 54 percent was its capacity factor). But in 2019, the country only produced a meager 5 percent more (607 TWh).
During the twenty-year period, the Germans also paid a hefty price for the program. For example, the average cost of electricity for German households has doubled since 2000. By 2019, households had to pay 34 U.S. cents per kilowatt-hour, compared to 22 cents per kilowatt-hour in France and 13 cents in the United States, according to data from IEEE Spectrum.
That’s not all. This year, the coldest weather in a decade arrives in western Europe. Bitter cold and snow sweep across western Europe including Germany, Great Britain, and France. Germany faces a sober reality as millions of its solar panels are blanketed in snow and ice and breathless. The freezing weather has rendered its 30,000 wind turbines to idleness. It is not just the wind turbines. Solar panels covered with snow are also rendered useless. You may call it “coal comfort” as a total collapse in the wind and solar output leaves freezing Germans desperate for coal-fired power.
For many years, Germany has been held up as the world’s wind and solar capital. But now, the deadly winter is putting a strain on Germany’s Energiewende program and the country has to be rescued by, you guessed it, “dirty” fossil fuels.
~Snip~
The reporter went on to say that Germany will have to rely more on natural gas from Russia, coal power from Poland, and nuclear power from France.


Comment:
Mother Nature has a great sense of humor, doesn’t She?
At what cost is Green Energy?... as the article says it is high ... so high that as many as 1.5 million households can not afford electricity and go without. They shut down their nuke plants when Japan had their huge accident and the cost shot up. This because of so few coal plants operable.
Now Germany is buying it's power as far as Russia...


 

Jimmy_Chitwood

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Germany’s ‘Green’ Energy Failure:
Germany turns back to ‘dirty’ coal and natural gas as millions of its solar panels are blanketed in snow and ice
Germany’s ‘Green’ Energy Failure: Germany turns back to ‘dirty’ coal and natural gas as millions of its solar panels are blanketed in snow and ice | Tech News | Startups News (techstartups.com)
11 Feb 2021 ~~ By Nickie Louise

Energiewende is a German word for ‘”energy transition.” Energiewende is a policy launched by the German government in 2000 to decarbonize its primary energy supply. Depending on whom you ask, the program has been praised by many environmentalists and others called it a failure.
In 2000 when the program was first launched, 6.6 percent of Germany’s electricity came from renewable sources such as solar and wind. In 2019, almost two decades later, the share reached 41.1 percent. That’s where the good news end. In 2000, Germany had an installed capacity of 121 gigawatts with 577 terawatt-hours generated, which is 54 percent as much as it theoretically could have done (that is, 54 percent was its capacity factor). But in 2019, the country only produced a meager 5 percent more (607 TWh).
During the twenty-year period, the Germans also paid a hefty price for the program. For example, the average cost of electricity for German households has doubled since 2000. By 2019, households had to pay 34 U.S. cents per kilowatt-hour, compared to 22 cents per kilowatt-hour in France and 13 cents in the United States, according to data from IEEE Spectrum.
That’s not all. This year, the coldest weather in a decade arrives in western Europe. Bitter cold and snow sweep across western Europe including Germany, Great Britain, and France. Germany faces a sober reality as millions of its solar panels are blanketed in snow and ice and breathless. The freezing weather has rendered its 30,000 wind turbines to idleness. It is not just the wind turbines. Solar panels covered with snow are also rendered useless. You may call it “coal comfort” as a total collapse in the wind and solar output leaves freezing Germans desperate for coal-fired power.
For many years, Germany has been held up as the world’s wind and solar capital. But now, the deadly winter is putting a strain on Germany’s Energiewende program and the country has to be rescued by, you guessed it, “dirty” fossil fuels.
~Snip~
The reporter went on to say that Germany will have to rely more on natural gas from Russia, coal power from Poland, and nuclear power from France.


Comment:
Mother Nature has a great sense of humor, doesn’t She?
At what cost is Green Energy?... as the article says it is high ... so high that as many as 1.5 million households can not afford electricity and go without. They shut down their nuke plants when Japan had their huge accident and the cost shot up. This because of so few coal plants operable.
Now Germany is buying it's power as far as Russia...




German ShutDown Nukes:


"How you like me now, Kraut Biotches?"
 

Manonthestreet

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Its not a failure, Putins lapdog Merkel has succceeded fabulously making Germany dependent on other countries for basics survival. Now they can export their jobs cause third worlders can do it cheaper
 

Moonglow

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I do believe that the failure of all systems is a concern and is not a partisan issue.
 
OP
Doc7505

Doc7505

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I do believe that the failure of all systems is a concern and is not a partisan issue.


Especially when European models that the Progressive Marxist?DSA Democrats try to follow fail measurably. Green Deal Anyone?
 

HenryBHough

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The Xiden approach will be different.

Simply shut down resource development and, in time, electricity will be priced out of the reach of everyone but Democrat Elites. Of course they'll need something like an "energy passport" subject to revocation should the bearer be thinking any sort of unauthorized sorts. Or, indeed, if caught thinking at all!
 

Jimmy_Chitwood

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The Xiden approach will be different.

Simply shut down resource development and, in time, electricity will be priced out of the reach of everyone but Democrat Elites. Of course they'll need something like an "energy passport" subject to revocation should the bearer be thinking any sort of unauthorized sorts. Or, indeed, if caught thinking at all!


No vaccination no AC Power.
 
OP
Doc7505

Doc7505

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Why don't the French next door have such crises?

Watch out when the Krauts get upitty and jealous....

~~~~~~
Obviously you don't know much about Europe.

Nuclear power in France - Wikipedia
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nuclear_power_in_France
France
's nuclear reactors comprise 90 per cent of EDFs capacity and so they are used in load-following mode and some reactors close at weekends because there is no market for the electricity. [40] [7] This means that the capacity factor is low by world standards, usually in the high seventies as a percentage, which is not an ideal economic ...
**********​

Nuclear Power in France | French Nuclear Energy - World ...
www.world-nuclear.org/.../countries-a-f/france.aspx
France's nuclear reactors comprise 90% of EdF's capacity and hence are used in load-following mode (see section below), so their capacity factor is low by world standards, at about 70%. Licence renewal and uprates. The average age of EdF’s fleet of 58 reactors is 35 years.
 

Jimmy_Chitwood

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Why don't the French next door have such crises?

Watch out when the Krauts get upitty and jealous....

~~~~~~
Obviously you don't know much about Europe.

Nuclear power in France - Wikipedia
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nuclear_power_in_France
France
's nuclear reactors comprise 90 per cent of EDFs capacity and so they are used in load-following mode and some reactors close at weekends because there is no market for the electricity. [40] [7] This means that the capacity factor is low by world standards, usually in the high seventies as a percentage, which is not an ideal economic ...
**********​

Nuclear Power in France | French Nuclear Energy - World ...
www.world-nuclear.org/.../countries-a-f/france.aspx
France's nuclear reactors comprise 90% of EdF's capacity and hence are used in load-following mode (see section below), so their capacity factor is low by world standards, at about 70%. Licence renewal and uprates. The average age of EdF’s fleet of 58 reactors is 35 years.


I asked about France as I knew the answer.
 

jackflash

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Germany’s ‘Green’ Energy Failure:
Germany turns back to ‘dirty’ coal and natural gas as millions of its solar panels are blanketed in snow and ice
Germany’s ‘Green’ Energy Failure: Germany turns back to ‘dirty’ coal and natural gas as millions of its solar panels are blanketed in snow and ice | Tech News | Startups News (techstartups.com)
11 Feb 2021 ~~ By Nickie Louise

Energiewende is a German word for ‘”energy transition.” Energiewende is a policy launched by the German government in 2000 to decarbonize its primary energy supply. Depending on whom you ask, the program has been praised by many environmentalists and others called it a failure.
In 2000 when the program was first launched, 6.6 percent of Germany’s electricity came from renewable sources such as solar and wind. In 2019, almost two decades later, the share reached 41.1 percent. That’s where the good news end. In 2000, Germany had an installed capacity of 121 gigawatts with 577 terawatt-hours generated, which is 54 percent as much as it theoretically could have done (that is, 54 percent was its capacity factor). But in 2019, the country only produced a meager 5 percent more (607 TWh).
During the twenty-year period, the Germans also paid a hefty price for the program. For example, the average cost of electricity for German households has doubled since 2000. By 2019, households had to pay 34 U.S. cents per kilowatt-hour, compared to 22 cents per kilowatt-hour in France and 13 cents in the United States, according to data from IEEE Spectrum.
That’s not all. This year, the coldest weather in a decade arrives in western Europe. Bitter cold and snow sweep across western Europe including Germany, Great Britain, and France. Germany faces a sober reality as millions of its solar panels are blanketed in snow and ice and breathless. The freezing weather has rendered its 30,000 wind turbines to idleness. It is not just the wind turbines. Solar panels covered with snow are also rendered useless. You may call it “coal comfort” as a total collapse in the wind and solar output leaves freezing Germans desperate for coal-fired power.
For many years, Germany has been held up as the world’s wind and solar capital. But now, the deadly winter is putting a strain on Germany’s Energiewende program and the country has to be rescued by, you guessed it, “dirty” fossil fuels.
~Snip~
The reporter went on to say that Germany will have to rely more on natural gas from Russia, coal power from Poland, and nuclear power from France.


Comment:
Mother Nature has a great sense of humor, doesn’t She?
At what cost is Green Energy?... as the article says it is high ... so high that as many as 1.5 million households can not afford electricity and go without. They shut down their nuke plants when Japan had their huge accident and the cost shot up. This because of so few coal plants operable.
Now Germany is buying it's power as far as Russia...



One can lead the gullible to common sense, but one can't make the gullible accept it.
 

zaangalewa

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Germany’s ‘Green’ Energy Failure:
Germany turns back to ‘dirty’ coal and natural gas as millions of its solar panels are blanketed in snow and ice
Germany’s ‘Green’ Energy Failure: Germany turns back to ‘dirty’ coal and natural gas as millions of its solar panels are blanketed in snow and ice | Tech News | Startups News (techstartups.com)
11 Feb 2021 ~~ By Nickie Louise

Energiewende is a German word for ‘”energy transition.” Energiewende is a policy launched by the German government in 2000 to decarbonize its primary energy supply. Depending on whom you ask, the program has been praised by many environmentalists and others called it a failure.
In 2000 when the program was first launched, 6.6 percent of Germany’s electricity came from renewable sources such as solar and wind. In 2019, almost two decades later, the share reached 41.1 percent. That’s where the good news end. In 2000, Germany had an installed capacity of 121 gigawatts with 577 terawatt-hours generated, which is 54 percent as much as it theoretically could have done (that is, 54 percent was its capacity factor). But in 2019, the country only produced a meager 5 percent more (607 TWh).
During the twenty-year period, the Germans also paid a hefty price for the program. For example, the average cost of electricity for German households has doubled since 2000. By 2019, households had to pay 34 U.S. cents per kilowatt-hour, compared to 22 cents per kilowatt-hour in France and 13 cents in the United States, according to data from IEEE Spectrum.
That’s not all. This year, the coldest weather in a decade arrives in western Europe. Bitter cold and snow sweep across western Europe including Germany, Great Britain, and France. Germany faces a sober reality as millions of its solar panels are blanketed in snow and ice and breathless. The freezing weather has rendered its 30,000 wind turbines to idleness. It is not just the wind turbines. Solar panels covered with snow are also rendered useless. You may call it “coal comfort” as a total collapse in the wind and solar output leaves freezing Germans desperate for coal-fired power.
For many years, Germany has been held up as the world’s wind and solar capital. But now, the deadly winter is putting a strain on Germany’s Energiewende program and the country has to be rescued by, you guessed it, “dirty” fossil fuels.
~Snip~
The reporter went on to say that Germany will have to rely more on natural gas from Russia, coal power from Poland, and nuclear power from France.


Comment:
Mother Nature has a great sense of humor, doesn’t She?
At what cost is Green Energy?... as the article says it is high ... so high that as many as 1.5 million households can not afford electricity and go without. They shut down their nuke plants when Japan had their huge accident and the cost shot up. This because of so few coal plants operable.
Now Germany is buying it's power as far as Russia...



Eh? What from this here has really to do with my country Germany? We use meanwhile a lot of solar energy and wind energy. The winter was not cold. No one has problems with energy. And we use since a very very long time natural gas from Russia for heating. Oh by the way: And we reached our ambitious self-made target in the reduction of CO2 for 2020. And we export 20% more electricity than we import. Specially it would really not make a big sense to import electricity from nuclear power plants (France) and coal power plants (Poland).

 
Last edited:

zaangalewa

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Oh by the way. Has anyone from you here any explanation why you hate Germany? Germany never did do anything bad to the USA in history, so you have absolutelly not any reason to hate Germany and/or Germans. But we have a lot of reasons to hate the USA and all US-Americans. So why do you hate us - but we don't hate you? Any explanation for this phenomenon, little grandchildren?

 
Last edited:

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