Amazing Animal Facts

Adam's Apple

Senior Member
Joined
Apr 25, 2004
Messages
4,092
Reaction score
448
Points
48
Many animals are on the move when seasons change, but where do they go and how do they get there? The following animals have fascinating travel tales--no matter what time of year they make their move.

1. Whales
In autumn whales move from subpolar to subtropical seas to reproduce, returning to colder, food-rich waters in late spring. They may be guided by a magnetic substance (called magnetite) in their brains that functions as a magnetic compass.

2. Bluefish
Known for their sharp teeth and insatiable appetites, bluefish migrate in dense packs each spring, preying on other fish that come inshore to spawn. Bluefish often leave a trail of blood for miles as they consume other fish in a feeding frenzy.

3. Lemmings
When overpopulation of the Norway lemming leads to a food scarcity and habitat overcrowding, thousands of the animals migrate overland in search of food. Many lemmings die during the migratory process--lemmings that reach the sea drown while attempting to swim the ocean as if it were a river.

4. Lobsters
Each year, the spiny lobster makes an astounding migration. Individual lobsters join large numbers of others to march single file across the ocean's floor. Scientists don't fully understand why the spiny lobsters do this, but it is believed to have something to do with their reproductive cycle.

5. Turtles
Each year thousands of female green turtles swim more than 1,000 miles from the coast of Brazil to tiny Ascension Island in the South Atlantic Ocean. There they haul themselves onto the sandy beaches, scrape out shallow nests, and deposit their eggs. Then they swim back to Brazil.

6. Eels
Freshwater eels spend most of their lives in North American and British lakes and rivers, but to reproduce they swim from each side of the Atlantic to an area of the Sargasso Sea between Bermuda and Puerto Rico. Land barriers are no problem: The eels just slither overland through dewy grass. After breeding, they return to their freshwater homes.

7. Monarch Butterflies
The monarch butterfly is known for its extraordinarily long migrations: Monarchs that live east of the Rocky Mountains fly to central Mexico, and those that live west of the Rockies migrate to the California coast. The longest recorded flight for a tagged adult is 1,800 miles.

8. Plovers
The American golden plover travels about 8,000 miles from nesting areas in the Arctic to the southern tip of South America--one of the longest migrations known. The trip includes about 2,000 miles over open ocean.

9. Salmon
Juvenile salmon memorize the odor of the stream in which they were born. Years later they use this knowledge to navigate from the ocean back to the mouth of their home river; they then follow its distinctive odor upstream.
 

Johnney

Senior Member
Joined
Dec 9, 2003
Messages
4,330
Reaction score
141
Points
48
Location
IOWA
Adam's Apple said:
Many animals are on the move when seasons change, but where do they go and how do they get there? The following animals have fascinating travel tales--no matter what time of year they make their move.

1. Whales
In autumn whales move from subpolar to subtropical seas to reproduce, returning to colder, food-rich waters in late spring. They may be guided by a magnetic substance (called magnetite) in their brains that functions as a magnetic compass.

2. Bluefish
Known for their sharp teeth and insatiable appetites, bluefish migrate in dense packs each spring, preying on other fish that come inshore to spawn. Bluefish often leave a trail of blood for miles as they consume other fish in a feeding frenzy.

3. Lemmings
When overpopulation of the Norway lemming leads to a food scarcity and habitat overcrowding, thousands of the animals migrate overland in search of food. Many lemmings die during the migratory process--lemmings that reach the sea drown while attempting to swim the ocean as if it were a river.

4. Lobsters
Each year, the spiny lobster makes an astounding migration. Individual lobsters join large numbers of others to march single file across the ocean's floor. Scientists don't fully understand why the spiny lobsters do this, but it is believed to have something to do with their reproductive cycle.

5. Turtles
Each year thousands of female green turtles swim more than 1,000 miles from the coast of Brazil to tiny Ascension Island in the South Atlantic Ocean. There they haul themselves onto the sandy beaches, scrape out shallow nests, and deposit their eggs. Then they swim back to Brazil.

6. Eels
Freshwater eels spend most of their lives in North American and British lakes and rivers, but to reproduce they swim from each side of the Atlantic to an area of the Sargasso Sea between Bermuda and Puerto Rico. Land barriers are no problem: The eels just slither overland through dewy grass. After breeding, they return to their freshwater homes.

7. Monarch Butterflies
The monarch butterfly is known for its extraordinarily long migrations: Monarchs that live east of the Rocky Mountains fly to central Mexico, and those that live west of the Rockies migrate to the California coast. The longest recorded flight for a tagged adult is 1,800 miles.

8. Plovers
The American golden plover travels about 8,000 miles from nesting areas in the Arctic to the southern tip of South America--one of the longest migrations known. The trip includes about 2,000 miles over open ocean.

9. Salmon
Juvenile salmon memorize the odor of the stream in which they were born. Years later they use this knowledge to navigate from the ocean back to the mouth of their home river; they then follow its distinctive odor upstream.
<b>10. Blood thirsty ex-wives</b>
can smell money from across two states and go for the groin trying to get it
 

dmp

Senior Member
Joined
May 12, 2004
Messages
13,088
Reaction score
746
Points
48
Location
Enterprise, Alabama
1. Whales

Whale Steak
4 portions
4 slices of whalemeat @ 150 - 180 g
Salt and pepper, preferably freshly ground
4 onion rings
2 dessert spoonfulls of finely diced green or red peppers
1 dessert spoonful of finely diced parsley
1 dessert spoonful of finely diced gherkins


Carve the meat into slices of about 1.5 to 2 cm thick, beat them with your hands and press them into shape. Preheat the frying pan and melt some butter in it. Brown the butter before adding the meat. Fry the steaks on both sides. Whale meat should be fried for about 4-5 minutes on each side. The steaks taste best when they are medium rare, but they should be warmed right through and not eaten raw. Serve the steaks on a plate, place an onion ring on each of them and fill it with peppers, parsley and gherkins. Potato scollops taste good together with the steaks. Serve with a bowl of good, crisp lettuce and salad.


2. Bluefish

Bluefish in Beer Batter

1 1/2 to 2 pounds bluefish
1 1/2 cups flour
3 tblespoon baking powder
1 teaspoon salt
2 teaspoon lemon-pepper
10 oz beer
3 eggs beaten

Fillet and skin bluefish. Cut dark streak out of fish. Cut into
serving size pieces. Mix in bowl flour,baking powder, salt, and
lemon-pepper. Add beer and eggs to mixture, stir. Put fish in
batter and let set for about 20 mintues. Deep fry fish until golden
brown. Leftover batter is great for frying oysters, without a
fishy taste.
3. Lemmings

Hot Lemming Pudding
(a.k.a. Lemon Sponge Custard) 3/4 cup sugar
1-1/2 tablespoons butter
2 teaspoons grated lemon rind
2 or 3 egg yolks
3 tablespoons all-purpose flour
1/4 cup lemon juice
1 cup milk
2 or 3 egg whites
Preheat oven to 350°F. Cream sugar, butter, and lemon rind. Add egg yolks and beat well. Stir in flour alternately with lemon juice and milk. Beat egg whites until stiff but not dry and fold them into the yolk mixture. Place the batter into a buttered 7-inch baking dish. Set the dish on a rack in a pan filled with 1 inch of hot water. Bake for about 1 hour, or until set. Serve hot. Makes 4 servings.

4. Lobsters

1 (2-pound) lobster, steamed or boiled 6 minutes and cooled in ice water
3 tablespoons butter, melted
1/4 cup clam juice
Glacage, recipe follows
Lobster Mashed Yukon Potatoes, recipe follows
Charred Asparagus, recipe follows
2 tablespoons chopped chives or tarragon, as a garnish

Preheat oven to 375 degrees F.
Split the cooled lobster lengthwise from head through tail. Clean out and remove the green tamale material, the stomach, behind the eyes and the waste line through the tail. Crack the knuckles and reserve the meat for mashed potatoes. Remove the claw from the shell and place it in the lobster body cavity. Drizzle melted butter and clam juice over the lobster. Place on a sheet pan and heat 4 to 5 minutes in the oven.

Pre-heat broiler on high. Remove the pan from the oven and spoon the glacage mixture over the lobster. Place the glazed lobster under the broiler. The sauce should turn color as you watch. Broil to an appetizing light, bubbly brown crust.

Carefully transfer the lobster to a warmed plate. Serve with Lobster Mashed Yukon Potatoes and Charred Asparagus and garnish with either chives or tarragon.


Glacage:
4 egg yolks
Kosher or sea salt
Dash cayenne
Dash dry mustard
12 tablespoons unsalted butter (1 1/2 sticks), melted and warm
Freshly ground black pepper
2 to 3 teaspoons lemon juice
1/2 teaspoon chopped fresh tarragon
1 cup heavy whipping cream
Lobster Veloute, recipe follows

Set a bowl over a pot with simmering water to create a water bath. Place the egg yolks, 1 tablespoon salt, cayenne, dry mustard in the bowl and whip lightly to warm through. Emulsify and distribute the mustard, cayenne and salt. When warm, place in a blender. Turn on medium to high speed and slowly drizzle in the melted butter to attain as thick and homogenized sauce that is possible. Taste, re-season with salt, pepper, if needed, and the lemon juice as necessary. Fold in the tarragon. Use a rubber scraper and transfer to a small bowl and reserve over a pilot light until used.
Whip the cream to medium-soft peaks and place in the refrigerator.

In a medium bowl, blend exactly 1/3 volume of each of the 3 parts. Mix gently to blend and obtain a smooth blended consistency. Reserve warm.


Lobster Veloute:
4 tablespoons olive oil, divided
3 large shallots, sliced thinly
2 tablespoons chopped garlic
2 bay leaves
1 pint lobster stock
1/8 cup dry white wine
1/2 cup clam juice
6 tablespoons (3/4 stick) butter, softened
6 tablespoons flour

In a small saucepan over medium heat, add 2 tablespoons of the olive oil and heat. Add the shallots, garlic and bay leaves and saute until translucent, about 4 minutes. Remove from the heat and set aside.
Place lobster stock, white wine, cooked shallot mixture, clam juice and remaining olive oil in a medium saucepan. Reduce over medium high heat by 1/2. In a small bowl, knead together the butter and flour to make a paste. Slowly whisk 1/2 of the butter flour paste into the reduced liquid. Simmer to attain a medium thick sauce. Add more butter flour paste to thicken or clam juice to thin. Simmer 10 minutes to cook the starch in the flour. Pass through a strainer and reserve warm.


Lobster Yukon Gold Mashed Potatoes:
8 ounces yukon gold potatoes, cooked tender and mashed
Reserved lobster knuckle meat
Kosher salt
Fresh ground black pepper
3 tablespoons cream, warmed
1 ounce (1/4 stick) chilled butter, chopped into chunks

Mix all ingredients, season, to taste. Reserve warm.

Charred Asparagus:
6 pieces jumbo asparagus
2 tablespoons virgin olive oil
1 teaspoon balsamic vinegar
Kosher salt
Fresh black pepper

Mix together the olive oil and vinegar and season with salt and pepper. Marinate the asparagus. Char in a hot wok or broil or grill until dark brown on the outside.
Yield: 2 servings

5. Turtles
1 1/2 pounds turtle meat
2 3/4 teaspoons salt, in all
3/4 teaspoon cayenne, in all
6 cups water
1 stick unsalted butter
1/2 cup flour
1 1/2 cups chopped onions
2 tablespoons minced shallots
1/4 cup chopped bell peppers
1/4 cup chopped celery
3 bay leaves
1/2 teaspoon dried leaf thyme
2 tablespoons minced garlic
1 cup chopped tomatoes
1/2 cup Worcestershire sauce
3 tablespoons fresh lemon juice
1/2 cup dry sherry
1/4 cup chopped parsley
1/2 cup chopped green onions, plus 2 tablespoons for garnish
4 hard-boiled eggs, finely chopped, plus 2 tablespoons for garnish

Put the turtle meat in a large saucepan with 1 teaspoon of salt, 1/4-teaspoon cayenne and the water. Bring to a boil. Skim off any foam that rises to the top. Reduce heat to medium and simmer for 20 minutes. With a slotted spoon transfer the meat to a platter. Cut the meat into 1/2-inch dice and reserve the liquid. In another large saucepan, combine the butter and flour over medium heat, stirring constantly for 6 to 8 minutes to make a dark roux. Add the onions, shallots, bell peppers and celery. Stir occasionally and cook for 2 to 3 minutes until the vegetables are slightly tender. Add the bay leaves, thyme and garlic, cook for 2 minutes. Add the tomatoes and the turtle meat. Cook for 5 to 6 minutes stirring occasionally. Add the Worcestershire sauce, the remaining salt and cayenne, the turtle stock (about 6 cups) lemon juice, and sherry. Bring to a boil and reduce heat to medium and simmer for 10 minutes. Add the parsley, green onions, and eggs and simmer for 45 minutes. Garnish with green onions and chopped eggs.

6. Eels

8 ounces sushi rice
Sushi Su seasoning, recipe follows
1 full sheet nori (roasted seaweed)
1-ounce cucumber, julienned
1/2-ounce Kaiware (daikon sprouts), juilienne
4 ounces Unagi (broiled fresh water eel)
1 pinch sesame seeds
1 ounce Unagi Glaze, recipe follows
Gari (pickled ginger), to taste
Wasabi (Japanese horseradish), to taste
Soy Sauce, to taste
Special Equipment: Makisu (bamboo rolling mat)


To cook the sushi rice – wash rice well, drain and let stand for 30 minutes in colander. When cooking rice, for 1 cup of rice add just a little less than 1 cup water in a rice cooker. 45 minutes after rice has been started, remove into a big mixing bowl (plastic or wood is best, metal is also OK) to speed the cooling process. Add 1-ounce of sushi su seasoning and mix well into rice. Let stand to cool. Periodically turn your rice to cool evenly. Do this for about 20 to 30 minutes, then cover.
Place a full sheet of nori (rough side up), on the bamboo rolling mat. Cover the whole sheet except for about 7/8-inch at far end with rice, pressing rice with damp hands into an even layer. Sprinkle sesame seeds on rice from left to right. Place bands of Unagi, cucumber, and kaiware sprouts across leading edge of nori. Roll closest edge to you, up and away from you, very carefully tuck in the roll and continue until you reach the bare end, to seal your roll. Make sure when rolling all ingredients are tightly secured, this will help to keep ingredients intact when cutting. Compress the roll with the bamboo mat. You may shape your roll making it slightly oval or squared off. To serve, slice into 12 even slices. Place Unagi glaze on plate or serve as side dish. Fan out sushi on plate, garnish with pickled ginger and wasabi. Serve with soy sauce.

Sushi hints: Nori has 2 sides, 1 rough and 1 smooth and shiny. The rough side holds the rice better and the smooth side is more presentable on the outside. Also, water is your best friend when making sushi. Keep you hands wet when handling rice so the rice will not stick to your hands. This is important when slicing or cutting sushi rolls, keep your knife wet at all times so the knife can glide through the rice.


Sushi Su seasoning:
3 tablespoons sugar
1 tablespoon salt
1 cup rice vinegar
1- ounce sea kelp

Combine all ingredients in a saucepan. Cook just until sugar completely dissolves. Remove from the heat and cool completely.

Unagi Glaze:
4 ounces sake
4 ounces mirin
1-ounce sugar
1-ounce water
1/2-ounce soy sauce


7. Monarch Butterflies

1 1/4 cups sifted cake flour
1/2 teaspoon baking soda
1/4 teaspoon baking powder
1/4 teaspoon salt
8 tablespoons (1 stick) cool unsalted butter, cut into pieces
1/2 cup plus 2 tablespoons sugar
1 egg yolk
1 egg
1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract
1/2 cup sour cream
Rainbow sprinkles
White frosting, see recipe below
36 (2-inch) lengths red licorice whips
12 (1 1/2-inch) lengths black licorice whips, cut in thin tapered strips
1 tube black icing (the supermarket kind with a small writing tip)
White Frosting:
2 tablespoons flour
1 cup milk
1 cup (2 sticks) unsalted butter
1 cup confectioners' sugar
1 teaspoon vanilla extract


Line a muffin tin with cupcake papers. Heat the oven to 350 degrees F. Sift the already sifted cake flour with the baking soda, baking powder and salt. Cream the butter in a mixer fitted with a whisk attachment until soft, then add the sugar and mix. Add the yolk, the egg and the vanilla and whip at medium-high speed until light and fluffy. With the mixer running at low speed, add a third of the flour mixture and mix. Then add half of the sour cream and mix. Add another third of the flour and mix. Add the remaining sour cream and mix, then the remaining flour. Give it one last mix to make sure everything is blended in. Pour the batter into the muffin cups, filling them 3/4 full. Bake until firm to the touch in the center, 20 to 25 minutes. Set the pan on a wire rack and let cool.
White Frosting: Over medium heat, cook the flour and milk until thickened. Let cool. In the bowl of an electric mixer, cream together the butter, sugar and vanilla until light and fluffy. Beat in the flour mixture.

To make the butterflies, spread a thick layer of rainbow sprinkles on a plate. Cut off the top rounded "cap" (like the cap of a mushroom or a muffin) of each cupcake. Spread the flat top of each "beheaded" cupcake with frosting. Cut a "V" shape wedges out of the center of each cap, creating 2 semicircles that will serve as the butterfly wings. Spread the flat cut side of the 2 semicircles with frosting, then dip in rainbow sprinkles to coat. Place the 2 wings on top of each cupcake, sprinkles side up, so that the curved sides meet in the middle.

Lay 3 strands of red licorice down the center of each one to make the body. Use two pieces of black licorice to make the antennae. Pipe 2 black dots for the eyes, placing one white sprinkle in the center of each eye.

8. Plovers
Roast Plover Recipe

Pluck a brace of plovers without drawing them, and wipe them well outside with a damp cloth. Truss them with the legs close to the body, and the feet pressing upon the thighs; bring the head round under the wing. Put them into a hot oven. Lay in the pan slice of toast, 1 slice for each bird, first moistening it in good gravy, and baste the plovers liberally. A few minutes before they are done dredge a little flour over them, and let them be nicely frothed. Serve upon the toast. A little melted butter may be sent to table in a tureen. Time to roast the birds, fifteen to twenty minutes. Sufficient for two persons.

9. Salmon

Cedar Plank Smoked Salmon

2 salmon fillets
2 thin untreated cedar planks
lots and lots of ginger -- chopped
2 tablespoons lime or lemon zest -- chopped fine
2 tablespoons orange zest -- chopped fine
salt and pepper
Cajun or Creole spice mix
olive oil
There are three main types of smoked salmon. There is cold smoked salmon, hot smoked salmon and grilled/smoked salmon. For the backyard griller, here is an easy and great tasting recipe.

I tried this recipe last weekend, and it was amazing. This is a variant of a signature dish of Emeril Lagasse (of the TVFN fame).

The original recipe used horseradish and trout instead of ginger and salmon.

I had a hard time finding thin cedar planks (shingles) sold singly in the local hardware store, they seemed to only sell them in bunches of 40. I did however find untreated cedar shims that I was able to make do with.

So anyway, here's what you do: Preheat your grill and oil up one side of the cedar with your olive oil. Sprinkle a bit of the Cajun seasoning on the plank, and lay the filet of salmon on top. Season the filet with salt, pepper, and the spice mix. Cover the filet completely with the ginger and zest -- this adds flavor and helps the fish retain all of its moisture. Put the whole thing directly on the grill over the coals, close the lid, and stand back! The thing will smoke like crazy for a while. Check on the salmon after 15 minutes.

If the plank catches on fire before the salmon is done, simply spray it with some water (I had to do this a couple times).

When the salmon is done, you can either serve the whole thing with the cedar flaming around the edges, or remove it from the cedar plank and serve.

You may wish to remove most of the crushed ginger topping as it is a bit overpowering.

A nice sauce to accompany this can be made with soy sauce, green onions, and sesame oil. I don't know the measurements, I just winged it.

If you have a backyard smoker (water smoker, SnP Pro, Black Diamond, Hondo, Weber Smokey Mountain) or a Weber Kettle grill, you can make excellent smoked salmon by just getting the smoker going at 250F, put some flavor wood chips (apple is nice) on the coals and put the salmon filets or steaks on a piece of oiled foil on the meat rack. Cook to an internal temperature of 150F (30-60 minutes depending on thickness of meat). I like to paint on some teriyaki sauce about 5 minutes before I take the fish off the rack and serve it. For the Weber Kettle grill, use the indirect heat cooking method.


:D

Do you know how hard it was to find a recipe for Lemmings? :)
 

Mr. P

Senior Member
Joined
Aug 5, 2004
Messages
11,329
Reaction score
622
Points
48
Location
South of the Mason Dixon
11.The cut throat reptile attorney
Usually follows the smell of blood and money, Usually accompanied buy #10
 

no1tovote4

Gold Member
Joined
Apr 13, 2004
Messages
10,299
Reaction score
617
Points
138
Location
Colorado
Mr. P said:
11.The cut throat reptile attorney
Usually follows the smell of blood and money, Usually accompanied buy #10

And is easy to spot when travelling as they are usually following directly after an ambulance.
 

Mr. P

Senior Member
Joined
Aug 5, 2004
Messages
11,329
Reaction score
622
Points
48
Location
South of the Mason Dixon
MtnBiker said:
When geese migrate have you ever noticed they fly in a v-pattern? Why is that?
Actually very interesting..It's for aerodynamic effects..Drag in particular..
The older have a place in the "V" were it's less of an effort to fly..
I saw a show on that..I'm sorry I don't remember the details..But it did have a definite purpose for the group/gaggle elders.
 

JOKER96BRAVO

Senior Member
Joined
Aug 13, 2004
Messages
4,433
Reaction score
290
Points
48
Amazing Animal Fact:
Male Kangaroos have retractable testicles.
(for when they fight)
 

Johnney

Senior Member
Joined
Dec 9, 2003
Messages
4,330
Reaction score
141
Points
48
Location
IOWA
JOKER96BRAVO said:
Amazing Animal Fact:
Male Kangaroos have retractable testicles.
(for when they fight)
mine are retractable when its cold out
 

MtnBiker

Senior Member
Joined
Sep 28, 2003
Messages
4,327
Reaction score
235
Points
48
Location
Rocky Mountains
Mr. P said:
Actually very interesting..It's for aerodynamic effects..Drag in particular..
The older have a place in the "V" were it's less of an effort to fly..
I saw a show on that..I'm sorry I don't remember the details..But it did have a definite purpose for the group/gaggle elders.
Interesting, also it seems typical that one side of the "V" is longer than the other, why is that?
 

Mr. P

Senior Member
Joined
Aug 5, 2004
Messages
11,329
Reaction score
622
Points
48
Location
South of the Mason Dixon
MtnBiker said:
Interesting, also it seems typical that one side of the "V" is longer than the other, why is that?
That I don't know, but have noticed the same. I've also noticed that they always fly in some sort of "V", not just during migration.
 

MtnBiker

Senior Member
Joined
Sep 28, 2003
Messages
4,327
Reaction score
235
Points
48
Location
Rocky Mountains
Mr. P said:
That I don't know, but have noticed the same.
It's because there are more geese on that side. :D


Actually I believe the v-pattern is for aerodynamic reasons, the geese in the back have less resistance then the lead geese and they switch from time to time. Make good sense, a group mentality that works in the most efficent manner. Wow nature.
 

Mr. P

Senior Member
Joined
Aug 5, 2004
Messages
11,329
Reaction score
622
Points
48
Location
South of the Mason Dixon
MtnBiker said:
It's because there are more geese on that side. :D


Actually I believe the v-pattern is for aerodynamic reasons, the geese in the back have less resistance then the lead geese and they switch from time to time. Make good sense, a group mentality that works in the most efficent manner. Wow nature.
No..I've seen the switch as well and it's not for aerodynamic reasons..It's cuz the one up front farted! Geeezzzzzz :D
 

5stringJeff

Senior Member
Joined
Sep 15, 2003
Messages
9,990
Reaction score
542
Points
48
Location
Puyallup, WA
-=d=- said:
1. Whales

Whale Steak


etc. etc. etc.


:D

Do you know how hard it was to find a recipe for Lemmings? :)
-=d=-, I think this was VERY funny!

He posts how amazing some animals are, and you reply with a recipe for eating each one? :D
 

Johnney

Senior Member
Joined
Dec 9, 2003
Messages
4,330
Reaction score
141
Points
48
Location
IOWA
gop_jeff said:
-=d=-, I think this was VERY funny!

He posts how amazing some animals are, and you reply with a recipe for eating each one? :D
hey now... a guys gotta eat! :cow:
 
OP
A

Adam's Apple

Senior Member
Joined
Apr 25, 2004
Messages
4,092
Reaction score
448
Points
48
JOKER96BRAVO said:
Amazing Animal Fact:
Male Kangaroos have retractable testicles.
(for when they fight)
Amaaazing feat! And I was impressed with what the lobsters, turtles, butterflies and plovers could do.....
 

Most reactions - Past 7 days

Forum List

Top