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1992 and 1994 were realigning elections in American politics

Newmarduk

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In 1992, Democrat Bill Clinton unseated incumbent President the elder Goerge Bush in a presidential election that also included Ross Perot as a third-party candidate. From 1968 to 1988, the Republican/GOP nominee was elected Prez five out of six times (Democrat Jimmy Carter was elected in 1976 but voted out in 1980). From 1968 to 1988, the GOP presidential nominees averaged 52 percent of the popular vote while the Democrat nominees averaged 43 percent of the popular vote. During this period, the GOP presidential nominees have received over 400 electoral votes four out of six times

Since 1992, the Democratic Party's presidential nominees have been elected to the White House four out of six times, have increased their share of the popular vote especially since 1996 (since 1996 the Democratic Party's presidential nominee has received AT LEAST 48 percent of the popular vote), and in all six presidential elections have received over 200 electoral votes.

Control of Congress since 1994, however, has been a different matter altogether. From 1930 to 1994, the Democrats were the majority party in the House of Representatives for 60 out of 64 years. Since 1994, however, the GOP has mostly controlled the House of Representatives.

The U.S. Senate from 1930 to 1980 was controlled the by Dems 46 out of 50 years. Since 1980, however, Senate controll has shifted between the parties no less than seven times. Senate control by the parties has shifted five times since 1994.

Could 2016 be yet another realigning election. Will the new President elected in 2016 be a Republican while congressional Republicans retain their House and Senate majorities? I believe this is very likely.

What about post-2016/post-Obama? Will the post-Obama Democrats be able to recover in 2018 and 2020?
 

g5000

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For the past 40 years, the House has had a 98 percent re-election rate of any incumbent who runs for re-election. This is not hyperbole. That is the actual re-election rate. It has remained unchanged despite more than half a dozen "campaign finance reform" acts and Supreme Court decisions.

Churn in the House of Representatives is mostly provided by someone dying or retiring.

In the Senate, for the past 40 years the re-election rate has been hovering around 80 percent.

And the party Establishment in Congress decides who the party nominees will be for President.

This is why I call Congress the American Politboro.


Americans have an 18 percent approval rating of Congress. And yet we re-elect them 98 percent of the time.

We are pissed off at Congress 82 percent of the time, and yet we continue to give them more than 50 percent of the vote.

We get all pissed off about the pork spending in Congress, but re-elect our own district Congressman and Senators because they bring home the bacon.

WHAT THE FUCK, AMERICA?!?
 

g5000

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1994, eh?

I can't stand New Gingrich. Let me just say that right up front. I absolutely detest that hypocritical, slimy, evil, adulterous motherfucker.

But I admire him for one thing. The Contract With America. Newt whipped out his dick and put a plan on the table and let the opposition rain sledgehammer blows down on his crank.

The man had a plan and he had the big dick to back it up. This is why chicks dig him.

Nowadays, the Republican party whines and keeps their hands covering their vaginas. They will not put a plan on the table to save their lives.
 

g5000

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Stick around. Live through a few more Democratic and Republican Congresses and Presidents.

Then try to say with a straight face that only one party spends too much.
 

jwoodie

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Sorry to interrupt the potty talk party, but aberrational elections usually follow unusual circumstances:

1. Lincoln elected because Democrats nominated two candidates.

2. Tilden (D) wins election but Hayes (R) inaugurated in deal to end Reconstruction.

3. Wilson elected by split in GOP (Taft/Roosevelt)

4. FDR elected due to Depression.

5. Clinton elected by conservative split (Bush/Perot).

6. Obama elected due to Recession (and race).
 

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