Polish Greatness

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    Świętosławski WOJCIECH ALOJZY, born on June 21, 1881, Kiryjówka (Ukraine), d. 29 IV 1968, Warsaw,
    Polish physicochemist.

    He was born on June 21, 1881 in Kiryjówka (Ukraine).In the period 1911-18, Świętosławski was an employee of a university in Moscow;1919-39 and 1946-51 professor at the Warsaw University of Technology (1928-29 its rector.), 1947-60 - University of Warsaw.In the years 1940-46 he stayed in the USA: 1940-41 he was a professor at the University of Pittsburgh, 1941-46 - Institute of Industrial Research Mellon in Pittsburgh.In the period 1947-60 he managed the Physicochemical Department of the Institute of General Chemistry in Warsaw (currently the Institute of Industrial Chemistry named after I. Mościcki), was the organizer and in 1955-60 the first director of the Institute of Physical Chemistry of the Polish Academy of Sciences in Warsaw.
    In 1928-32 and 1934-40 he was the vice-chairman of the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC); 1926-34 president, 1934-47 vice-president of the Thermochemical Commission, IUPAC Physicochemical Data Commission and the Commission of the International Physicochemical Design Office. In 1922 he became a member of the Warsaw Scientific Society, from 1923 - the Academy of Technical Sciences and the Polish Academy of Arts and Sciences (1934-46 vice-president), and in 1952 - the Polish Academy of Sciences.
    Świętosławski was the senator of the Republic of Poland and 1935-39 minister of religious denominations and public enlightenment (1937 allowed the introduction of a bench ghetto in colleges, accepting the so-called Aishan paragraph in the statutes of student associations). He did not belong to any political party, but he was an advocate of Józef Piłsudski. During his studies he cooperated with leftist organizations. As a member of the government, together with Deputy Prime Minister Eugeniusz. Kwiatkowski, he supported the president Ignacy Mościcki.
    Polish physicochemical school
    Świętosławski created a Polish physicochemical school, which issued 20 professors, promoted dozens of doctors and over 300 graduates, and also left outstanding successors in Russia. He was the author of many textbooks and monographs: Handbook on physical chemistry (1920, together with M. Centnerszwerem), Physical chemistry (volumes 1-4 1923-31), Ebuliometry (1935), Coke Formation Process and Physicochemical Properties of Coals (1942) , Ebuliometric Measurements (1945), Hard coal chemistry and coking (1953), Carbon tar (1956), Azeotropy and poliazeotropia(1957). In 1951 he was awarded the 1st degree state award for his entire scientific activity. He died on April 29, 1968 in Warsaw.
    Thermochemical measurements
    In his scientific work, he initially dealt with thermochemical measurements, from which he drew conclusions about the structure of organic molecules based on the algebraic relations he developed. He stated that the numerical results of analogous measurements coming from different laboratories differ significantly, so he introduced the method of conducting measurements in strictly defined conditions relative to the value obtained for the substance considered the reference.Świętosławski's proposals were adopted in 1922 by IUPAC; at his request in 1922, benzoic acid was adopted as the heat of combustion standard, 1933 changed (also at his request) to hydrogen.
    Contribution to the development of ebulliometry and azeotropy
    The necessity of obtaining the purest possible model substances prompted Świętosławski to improve measuring instruments, especially calorimeters.Constructed (together with Alicja Dorabialska) microcalorimeters to measure negligible amounts of heat released and (with Witold Romer) ebuliometry - instruments for precise measurement of the boiling point of pure liquids and solutions (by ebulliometry, boiling points of dilute solutions can be determined and molecular masses of chemical compounds used and used for determining the degree of purity of the liquid, solubility of the substance, in studies of azeotropes and others). Świętosławski also contributed to the development of azeotropy - he developed the systematics of two-component azeotropic systems, which in 1946-60, along with his students, expanded to multi-component systems.
    Coal Department
    In 1918-27, Świetosławski cooperated with military institutions on activated carbons for gas masks. In 1927 he organized the Coal Department of the Chemical Research Institute (1927-39 managed the Department), in which, together with his colleagues, he studied the ability to absorb gases by various types of hard coal and developed the theory of the coking process. After 1946, he took up the technology of processing coal tar, in large quantities obtained in Poland in hard coal coking processes; its purpose was to isolate from the tar (physicochemical methods) very pure substances that could replace the inaccessible products on the world market (previously provided by the German industry destroyed during the war), but political considerations made it impossible to implement this goal.

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    Holograms – A Polish Speciality
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    4. Holograms – A Polish Speciality
    A small Polish company has cornered the market producing devices for making hologram designs—a niche but prestigious sector.
    Holograms can be found on notes, credit cards, CD cases, labels and excise stamps. But before they can be manufactured, a special machine must use a laser to carve a matrix, an intricate pattern on the surface of a glass plate covered with a photosensitive layer. Polskie Systemy Holograficzne, a Warsaw-based company, is where such high-tech apparatus is produced.

    “We supply hologram manufacturers with the equipment they need to launch the production process,” explains Paweł Stępień, a partner in Polskie Systemy Holograficzne. “We’re the biggest provider of high-quality equipment for the production of holographic designs. You can say that we’ve monopolised this market sector,” he adds.

    Holography is essentially a Polish discovery. Its forerunner was Mieczysław Wolfke, a brilliant physicist, a student of Albert Einstein and Warsaw University of Technology professor. In 1920, he discovered the phenomenon of holography and developed its theoretical foundations, setting the groundwork for research on the same subject carried out in the 1940s by Hungary’s Dennis Gabor, who in 1971 was awarded a Nobel Prize in recognition of his contribution to holography. Yet, it wasn’t until the laser was invented in 1960 that their ideas could get off the ground.

    [​IMG]Paweł Stępień took an interest in holograms in the early 1990s, when he worked as an assistant professor at the Warsaw University of Technology. “I was doing research into the properties of computer-generated holograms,” he says. “First, a university friend and I worked together on Holografia Polska. In 2001, we set up our own business, and that’s how Polskie Systemy Holograficzne was born.”

    The Polish company’s biggest customers are in Asian countries, where holographic packaging is in high demand. With stunning visual effects, it is easy on the eye and being difficult to counterfeit, it also serves as an anti-fake measure. Protective holograms, including the tiny ones on payment cards and excise stamps, account for the Polish company’s most strategic market sector.

    “The market is small, and we can say it’s already saturated with our machines, of which we have sold 40 in total,” says Stępień. “Customers from India and China have bought our equipment in the highest numbers, around ten went to Europe, and two each to the United States and Russia.”

    He says he cannot exactly boast about his customers because he signed confidentiality clauses with all of them and because big contractors providing government documents are particularly sensitive about confidentiality issues.

    New production opportunities related to surfaces with unique light-reflecting properties are now opening up for Polskie Systemy Holograficzne. Such solutions could include windows covered with film with micro-lenses that direct light towards solar cells.

    “In collaboration with the Electrotechnical Institute in Wroclaw we’re working on optical microstructures on the surface of electrodes in solar cells,” says Stępień. “Such surfaces intentionally made rough are capable of ‘capturing’ light to maximally utilise the solar energy and deliver the highest efficiency of the cells. We’re also developing a machine that could engineer such elements,” he said.

    Holograms – A Polish Speciality
     
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    Jacek Jemielity, Joanna Kowalska, Edward Darżynkiewicz and team (Poland)
    [​IMG][​IMG]

    Additional video:

    Category: Research

    Sector: Medical technology

    Company: University of Warsaw (Poland)

    Patent number: EP2167523,EP2297175


    Invention: Stabilised mRNA for new therapies for cancers and genetic defects

    The discovery of more stable messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) compounds by a group of Polish researchers paves the way for new therapies for cancers and inherited genetic diseases. Jacek Jemielity, Joanna Kowalska, Edward Darżynkiewicz and their team invented the so-called beta-S-ARCA and beta-B-ARCA compounds that are now finding their way into vaccines and anti-cancer medications.

    [​IMG]Thanks to research spanning nearly four decades, the Polish scientists have injected fresh vigour into the field of protein biosynthesis for personalised medicine with their methods for stabilising mRNA.

    Their more stable mRNA is not a treatment itself but offers an improved delivery system for therapies using the body's genetic communication channels (its mRNA). The patented invention enables delivery of modified mRNA that can withstand the human body's enzymes. The more stable mRNA is five times more effective and lasts three times longer within a cell than naturally occurring mRNA molecules.

    Societal benefit
    While survival rates for cancer have greatly improved over the past decade, treatment of the disease can take a heavy toll on patients, especially because of the side effects of chemotherapy. With projections that two out of every five people can now expect to get cancer in their lifetime, personalised medicine could be key to saving lives.

    The therapeutic potential of mRNA opens up the possibility of "programming" the human immune system to produce proteins to help fight specific diseases without directly altering a patient's DNA - so far a relatively risky and difficult endeavour. The team's invention may prove to be a powerful asset as scientists unlock the full potential of human DNA. Currently, more than 1 800 disease genes have been identified and more than 2 000 genetic tests have become available, yet there are a total of 20 000 genes in the human genome.

    Economic benefit
    The scientists at the University of Warsaw (UW) were ahead of the curve in researching more stable forms of mRNA as a vehicle for therapeutics: their research extends back to the 1980s. After discovering promising mRNA compounds, their findings were confirmed, and the invention refined, by a team at Louisiana State University Health Sciences Centre, USA, led by Prof Robert E. Rhoads and Dr Ewa M. Grudzian-Nogalska. They filed for key European patents for mRNA technology in 2008 and established a partnership with German biopharma company BioNTech to bring their patented mRNA stabilisation method to market.

    Clinical trials began in 2010, and in the following years BioNTech went on to license mRNA technology to major pharmaceutical companies, including French multinational Sanofi and Swiss multinational Roche's US-based Genentech. Joining forces with Genentech, BioNTech is testing the technology as a stand-alone treatment, as well as in combination with Roche's anti-cancer drug Tecentriq.

    According to experts at Market Research Future, the global personalised medicine market is expected to reach EUR 72 billion by 2022, more than doubling in value from EUR 32 billion in 2015. North America is leading the market, followed by Europe. The main drivers are increased patient involvement in healthcare, integrated data from a wider range of sources, integration of wireless technologies with portable healthcare devices and an increase in genetic diseases.

    • [​IMG]
      Joanna Kowalska, Edward Darżynkiewicz and Jacek Jemielity (from left to right)

    • [​IMG]
      Joanna Kowalska

    • [​IMG]
      Stabilising messenger RNA

    • [​IMG]
      Jacek Jemielity

    • [​IMG]
      Jacek Jemielity, Joanna Kowalska and Edward Darżynkiewicz (from left to right)

    • [​IMG]
      Jacek Jemielity, Joanna Kowalska and Edward Darżynkiewicz (from left to right)

    • [​IMG]
      Joanna Kowalska
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    How it works
    DNA contains the thousands of genes that provide the instructions for producing the many proteins, enzymes and other molecules that make up the human body. These instructions are passed to the cells' protein factories, ribosomes, through a short-lived instructional code, mRNA. Should DNA become altered through inherited or externally caused mutations, it can send out faulty instructions. In the case of a cancer, this leads to abnormal cell grow. For other genetic diseases, it might result in over- or underproduction of specific proteins.

    The mRNA developed by Jemielity and his team alters just one of the roughly 80 000 atoms in a typical mRNA molecule to make it strong enough to withstand enzymes in the body that would otherwise break it down before it could deliver "corrected" genetic instructions.

    In one application of the technology, BioNTech has developed a melanoma cancer vaccine that relies on DNA sequencing of a patient's tumour and cross-comparison of this DNA with that of healthy tissue. After mutations are identified, artificially altered mRNA is injected into the patient, allowing the body's immune system to identify and destroy cancer cells with the telltale mutation markers throughout the body. The vaccine has shown promising results in phase one clinical trials.

    EPO - Jacek Jemielity, Joanna Kowalska, Edward Darżynkiewicz and team (Poland)
     
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    Louis Mékarski (in Polish Ludwik Mękarski) (1843, Clermont-Ferrand,[1] France – 1923) was a French engineer and inventor of Polish origin. In the 1870s he invented the so-called Mekarski system of compressed-air powered trams which was used in several cities of France and USA as alternative to horse-powered and steam-powered trams.

    Patents[edit]
    Louis Mékarski (with Paul Lucas-Girardville, an early aviator)[2] patented a similar system for automobiles in 1903.[3] Waste heat from an internal combustion engine generated steam, which was mixed with compressed air from an air compressor driven by the ic engine. The air/steam mixture then drove a separate piston engine which propelled the vehicle. This system pre-dated the better-known Still engine.

    Mékarski also obtained a patent for spring wheels for vehicles

    Louis Mékarski - Wikipedia
     
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    Trams in Łódź made their first appearance on 23 December 1898. Łódź was the first city to have electric trams in what was then Congress Poland. Initially, there were two fairly short tram lines that both served the city centre area; by February 1899 their number was doubled. Two years later, the first suburban tram lines started – the Pabianice and Zgierz lines. Both of these initiatives were the result of the activities of private companies in which German manufacturers dominated.

    In the years 1910-1931 suburban tram lines connected many important places around the city, creating the largest such network in Poland, which remained unchanged until the end of the 1980s. In the first half of the 1990s, some of them were closed down, but the process has since been halted, leaving Łódź the only city in the country to still have such a system of commuter trams.

    Trams in Łódź - Wikipedia
     
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    Vickers Tank Periscope MK.IV
    Vickers Tank Periscope MK.IV

    ...
    [​IMG]
    The Gundlach Periscope, usually known under its British designation as Vickers Tank Periscope MK.IV, was a revolutionary invention by Polish engineer Rudolf Gundlach, manufactured for Polish 7TP tanks since end of 1935 and patented in 1936 as Gundlach Peryskop obrotowy. It was the first device to allow the tank commander to have a 360-degree view from his turret with a single periscope. By rotating the periscope and allowing the tank commander to look backwards through the second eyepiece, he no longer had to change position to look behind the turret. Early tanks had small turrets and fixed seating, without an independently rotating cupola, and so the commander wasn't easily able to move himself to another rear-facing periscope.

    The design was first used in the Polish 7TP light tank. Shortly before the war it was given to the British and was used in almost all tanks of WWII, including the British Crusader, Churchill, Valentine, and Cromwell and the American Sherman. After the German and Soviet attack and fall of Poland in 1939 it was copied entirely from captured 7TP and TKS Polish tanks and later by USSR (including the T-34 and T-70).

    As a part of Polish-British pre-war military cooperation, the patent was sold for a penny (actually 1 Polish Zloty) to Vickers-Armstrong. It was produced as the Vickers Tank Periscope MK.IV (pictured), and built into all British tanks (Crusader, Churchill, Valentine, Cromwell). After the fall of Poland, Germany, USSR and Romania captured some equipment, allowing them to copy the invention. In USSR the Gundlach periscope was known as MK-4 (harking to the British designation, as Russian sources openly confirm that it was copied from samples acquired with British-supplied tanks) and implemented in all tanks (including the T-34 and T-70). Later technology was transferred to USA and as a periscope M6 implemented in all US tanks (M3/M5 Stuart, M4 Sherman and others). At the end of World War II this technology was adopted throughout the world and used basically unchanged for almost 50 years, until it was replaced by electronic devices.

    References

    • Grzegorz Łukomski and Rafał E. Stolarski, Nie tylko Enigma... Mjr Rudolf Gundlach (1892-1957) i jego wynalazek (Not Only Enigma... Major Rudolf Gundlach (1892-1957) and His Invention), Warsaw-London, 1999.
    • PDF of 1938 US patent 2130006
    Vickers Tank Periscope MK.IV | Revolvy
     
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    International success for Polish conductor
    04.09.2018 10:57
    Poland's Joanna Natalia Ślusarczyk has won second prize at the Jeunesses Musicales International Conducting Competition in Bucharest, Romania.
    [​IMG]Photo: pexels.com

    The event was entered by 50 budding conductors from across the world. They were judged by an international jury chaired by leading Norwegian conductor Sigmund Thorp.

    Earlier this year Ślusarczyk took the top award at the London Classical Soloists Conducting Competition. She also won third prize at the First European Union International Conducting Competition in Sofia, Bulgaria, and received an honourable mention at the BMW International Conducting Masterclass and Competition in Portugal.

    Ślusarczyk is a graduate of the Music Academies in Katowice and Kraków, southern Poland. She has appeared on the conductor’s podium in the United States, Russia, Israel, Norway, Iceland, Britain, France, and Ukraine.

    She is currently conductor-in-residence with the Silesian Philharmonic in Katowice

    International success for Polish conductor
     
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    The genius of Rudolf Stefan Weigl (1883–1957), a Lvovian microbe hunter and breeder
    Article · January 2003 with 57 Reads
    [​IMG]
    Waclaw Szybalski



    [​IMG]
    Photo Rudolf



    [​IMG]
    Stefan Weigl




    Abstract
    Rudolf Stefan Weigl (1883-1957) has made an enormous scientific contribution to microbiology, in general, by adapting the sucking insects, lice, to serve as laboratory animals. That permitted for the first propagation and studying of Rickettsia prowazekii, the agent of the typhus and production of the first effective vaccine against exanthematous (epidemic) typhus. Weigl has done it before and during the WWII in his Institute of Biology at the University of Jan Kazimierz (UJK), at that time in Lwów, Poland. The production of this vaccine was based on propagation of Rickettsia prowazekii, the microbial typhus agent, in the Weigl's strain of clothes lice, Pediculus vestimenti. The procedure of 1939 -1945 consisted of: (i) feeding of healthy lice with sucked blood, when kept in special cages placed on the skin of human 'feeders', (ii) infection of lice and propagation of R. prowazekii in the midgut (stomach) cells, (iii) the dissection of louse midgut, and (iv) the final preparation of the phenolized vaccine. Significance of Weigl's vaccine was enormous, both potentially and practically, at the time when it was developed just before and during WW2. However at present, the threat of typhus is almost not existent because of antibiotics and since lice could be very effectively controlled. Weigl's scientific heritage retains a great importance in the history of world medicine, especially in relation to the humanitarian, political and historical ramifications of the very Waclaw Szybalski: The genius of Rudolf Stefan Weigl (1883-1957), a Lvovian microbe hunter and and breeder -In Memoriam Waclaw Szybalski: The genius of Rudolf Stefan Weigl (1883-1957), a Lvovian microbe hunter and and breeder - In Memoriam (1 of 22) [2004-03-27 20:51:02] unique and trying period in the history of Central and Eastern Europe, including Lwów and Poland, during and after WW2.

    The genius of Rudolf Stefan Weigl (1883–1957), a Lvovian microbe hunter and breeder. Available from: https://www.researchgate.net/public...883-1957_a_Lvovian_microbe_hunter_and_breeder [accessed Sep 04 2018].
     
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    Poles contribute to the discovery of gravitational waves
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    4. Poles contribute to the discovery of gravitational waves
    A team of 15 Polish scientists have made a significant contribution to the breakthrough discovery of gravitational waves. They predicted that these waves originate from the collision of two black holes, and made calculations to separate the signal from background noise.
    The discovery of gravitational waves is the latest scientific evidence confirming the validity of Albert Einstein’s calculations made exactly a century ago.

    He predicted the existence of gravitational waves in his theory of general relativity, but it is only now that scientists have been able to detect them. The breakthrough was made possible by improved measuring devices – gravitational waves detectors. Simulations conducted by POLGRAW, a Polish team consisting of 15 scientists form seven institutes who are coordinated by Professor Andrzej Królak, helped to identify the elusive signal. Following an analysis of detector data by Polish scientists, it was possible to separate the right impulses from background noise. Nine Polish scientists were among the authors of a paper on this subject published in the Physical Review Letters journal.

    “We have been analysing data from American LIGO detectors. These are huge laser interferometers with arms ranging up to 4 kilometres in length,” Polska.pl was told by Professor Andrzej Królak from the Institute of Mathematics of the Polish Academy of Sciences (IM PAN).

    LIGO detectors are located on the east and west coasts of the United States. A similar device called Virgo, with 3-km long arms, also works in Europe, in Italy. It is currently being modernized and will also be able to detect gravitational waves. The American LIGO detectors which captured the phenomenon have recently undergone a similar modernization process.

    “These devices are so sensitive that they registered change in the length of one of the interferometer’s arms by one billionth of one billionth metre. It happened shortly after the restarting of LIGO detectors,” Prof. Królak said.

    It was essential to isolate this faint signal from interference, which is very common on Earth and includes shocks caused by earthquakes, passing cars or even blowing wind. To avoid false readings, the detectors’ optical systems are seismically insulated from the surroundings and placed in a ultra-high vacuum.

    What proved to be of great assistance in separating gravitational waves from the cosmic noise were calculations made by mathematicians from the POLGRAW team. Another team of Polish astrophysicists predicted that events such as mergers of black holes may occur much more often than previously suspected, and could become a source of gravitational waves that are strong enough to be detected.

    “A signal detected by LIGO detectors was the largest explosion ever registered by humankind,” said POLGRAW team member, Dr Michał Bejger of the Nicolaus Copernicus Astronomical Centre at the Polish Academy of Sciences. “It was triggered by a merger of two black holes 1.3 billion light years away from the Earth. A cataclysm bigger even than the explosion of a supernova. As much as three times the mass of the Sun was turned into energy in the form of gravitational waves, so at that single moment these merging black holes emitted more energy than the whole universe.”

    Poles contribute to the discovery of gravitational waves
     
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    [​IMG][​IMG]

    [​IMG]
    Wlodzimierz Kutner,
    Professor of Chemistry
    Group of molecular films research
    • M.Sc., 1971 - Department of Chemistry, University of Warsaw, Warsaw, Poland

    • Ph.D., 1975 - Department of Chemistry, University of Warsaw, Warsaw, Poland

    • D.Sc., 1995 - Institute of Physical Chemistry of the Polish Academy of Sciences, Warsaw, Poland

    • Professor, 2002 - Institute of Physical Chemistry of the Polish Academy of Sciences, Warsaw, Poland, as well as 2003- Department of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, School of Science, Cardinal Stefan Wyszynski University, Warsaw, Poland


    Professional affiliations
    • Polish Chem. Soc. Member since 1975, Vice President Warsaw Div. 1989-1992.
    • IUPAC Commission on Electroanal. Chem. V.5 Anal. Chem. Div. Affiliate Member 1988-1990, Assoc. Member 1990-1995, Titular Member 1995-2001, Secretary 1998-2001; Anal. Chem. Div. Committee Assoc. Member 2002-2007, Interdiv. Committee on Terminology, Nomenclature and Symbols, Titular Member 2002-2005, Assoc. Member, 2006-2007.
    Research activity
    • Supramolecular chemistry of inclusion polymers and molecularly imprinted polymers
    • Electrochemistry, spectroscopy as well as Langmuir and Langmuir-Blodgett films of fullerenes, carbon nanotubes, and metalloporphyrins for devices of energy conversion and energy storage
    • Electrodes modified with functional conducting polymer films: chemical sensors and biosensors
    Editorial activity
    • Associate Editor, Bioelectrochemistry, 2007 -
    Education and training
    • 1976-1977 - Chem. Dept., Univ. Cincinnati, Cincinnati OH, USA (Post-doctoral Fellow)
    • 1979 - Inst. Inorg. Chem., J. Gutenberg Univ., Mainz, Germany (Visit. Sci.)
    • 1983-1984 and 1985 - Chem. Dept., Univ. North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill NC, USA (Res. Assoc.)
    • 1990-1991 - Inst. Physical Chem. Electrochem., Fritz-Haber-Institut der Max-Planck-Gesellschaft, Berlin, Germany (Visit. Sci.)
    • 1991-1993 - Chem. Dept., Univ. Houston, Houston TX, USA (Res. Assist. Prof.)
    • 1994 - Dept. Chem. Biochem., New Mexico State Univ., Las Cruces NM, USA (Visit. Spec.)
    • 1994 - Dept. Electrochem. Conduct. Polymers, Leibniz Inst. Solid State Mater. Res., Dresden, Germany (Visit. Sci.)
    • 1997, 1998, 1999, 2002, 2003, and 2006 - Chem. Dept., Wichita State Univ., Wichita KS, USA (Visit. Sci., Visit. Prof.)
    • 2003 - Chem. Dept., Univ. Bordeaux 1, Bordeaux, France (Visit. Prof.)
    Recent publications
    1. Dabrowski, M., Cieplak, M., Noworyta, K, Heim, M, Adamkiewicz, W., Kuhn, A., Sharma, P. S., and Kutner, W., J. Mater. Chem. B. 2017, published online, "Surface enhancement of a molecularly imprinted polymer film using sacrificial silica beads for increasing L-arabitol chemosensor sensitivity and detectability". DOI: 10.1039/C7TB01407D.
    2. Łępicka, K., Pieta, P., Shkurenko, A., Borowicz, P., Majewska, M., Rosenkranz, M., Avdoshenko, S., Popov, A., Kutner, W., J. Phys. Chem. C, 2017, published online, "Spectroelectrochemical Approaches to Mechanistic Aspects of Charge Transport in meso Nickel(II) Schiff Base Electrochromic Polymer". DOI: 10.1021/acs.jpcc.7b04700.
    3. Obraztsov, I., Kutner, W., and D’Souza, F., Solar RRL, 2017, 1, 1600002, "Evolution of molecular design of porphyrin chromophore donors for photovoltaic materials of superior light-to-electricity conversion efficiency". DOI: 10.1002/solr.201600002.
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