Death to drug dealers!

Discussion in 'Law and Justice System' started by justinacolmena, Mar 19, 2018.

  1. justinacolmena
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    justinacolmena Active Member

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    Of course the "experts" oppose the death penalty for drug dealers, but what else can you do? When you put them in prison, they just continue dealing drugs in prison. It doesn't even slow them down. They use their prison cell as a "safe house" from which they issue orders to couriers, taking orders and dealing drugs both inside and outside the prison.

    The prison guards themselves are subjected to the "silver and lead" system: silver (money) if they cooperate, and lead (bullet) if they don't. So they take the money and shut up, because otherwise they will be murdered.

    Meanwhile the medical establishment "experts" have got a pretty good gig going dealing pharmaceutical prescription drugs themselves, and they don't want anyone to ruin it for them or expose their connections to the illegal street drug cartels either.

    I was forced to walk off first base of the war on drugs at the top of the first inning: "chronic paranoid schizophrenia" and "delusions of paranoia." I don't do the drugs they "prescribe" for those alleged conditions, either, but as a result, I'm permanently down on my luck and out of a job in America's drug-loving culture.
     
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  2. iamwhatiseem
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    iamwhatiseem Gold Member

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    We have a justice system that at times, is more concerned with the rights of the criminal than protecting the victim and future victims.
    SOmething must change, death penalty? I don't know if that is the answer, probably not. But it is something.
     
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  3. justinacolmena
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    justinacolmena Active Member

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    They're drug dealers. If our drug-loving prosecutors were willing to pin them on even a few of the aggravated murders that they have committed, there would be no problem imposing the death penalty, even under current law. It almost makes my head spin. I don't know exactly what went wrong, but I do know something went really, really wrong.
     
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  4. Penelope
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    Penelope Gold Member

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    all Trump did was make the for profit prisons happy.
    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    April 2, 2009

    On July 1, 2001, a nationwide law in Portugal took effect that decriminalized all drugs, including cocaine and heroin. Under the new legal framework, all drugs were “decriminalized,” not “legalized.” Thus, drug possession for personal use and drug usage itself are still legally prohibited, but violations of those prohibitions are deemed to be exclusively administrative violations and are removed completely from the criminal realm. Drug trafficking continues to be prosecuted as a criminal offense.

    While other states in the European Union have developed various forms of de facto decriminalization — whereby substances perceived to be less serious (such as cannabis) rarely lead to criminal prosecution — Portugal remains the only EU member state with a law explicitly declaring drugs to be “decriminalized.” Because more than seven years have now elapsed since enactment of Portugal’s decriminalization system, there are ample data enabling its effects to be assessed.

    Notably, decriminalization has become increasingly popular in Portugal since 2001. Except for some far-right politicians, very few domestic political factions are agitating for a repeal of the 2001 law. And while there is a widespread perception that bureaucratic changes need to be made to Portugal’s decriminalization framework to make it more efficient and effective, there is no real debate about whether drugs should once again be criminalized. More significantly, none of the nightmare scenarios touted by preenactment decriminalization opponents — from rampant increases in drug usage among the young to the transformation of Lisbon into a haven for “drug tourists” — has occurred.

    The political consensus in favor of decriminalization is unsurprising in light of the relevant empirical data. Those data indicate that decriminalization has had no adverse effect on drug usage rates in Portugal, which, in numerous categories, are now among the lowest in the EU, particularly when compared with states with stringent criminalization regimes. Although postdecriminalization usage rates have remained roughly the same or even decreased slightly when compared with other EU states, drug-related pathologies — such as sexually transmitted diseases and deaths due to drug usage — have decreased dramatically. Drug policy experts attribute those positive trends to the enhanced ability of the Portuguese government to offer treatment programs to its citizens — enhancements made possible, for numerous reasons, by decriminalization.

    Drug Decriminalization in Portugal: Lessons for Creating Fair and Successful Drug Policies
     
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  5. OldLady
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    OldLady Platinum Member

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    We have had an epidemic of opiate addiction for decades longer than most of you. Most of the dealers are dealing in order to feed their own habits. And because they're too friggin high to hold a job doing anything else.
    Addicts feeding their habit shouldn't be put to death, I don't think.
     
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  6. WillowTree
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    WillowTree Diamond Member

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    The left on this board want the drug dealers to be left alone. They are willing to sacrifice children to that end.
     
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  7. Penelope
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    Penelope Gold Member

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    Make prostitution legal and make them pay taxes and keep records.
     
  8. justinacolmena
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    justinacolmena Active Member

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    Some of them. Others are stone cold sober and clean, and still dealing. None of them hesitate to murder rival dealers, cops, witnesses, and neighbors. None of them hesitate to spike others' food and drink with drugs and alcohol, even on public highways. All of them are murderers many times over.
     
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  9. Penelope
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    Penelope Gold Member

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    Portugal shows that is not what happened.
     
  10. Penelope
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    Penelope Gold Member

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    Legalize it all and see what happens.
     

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