Why no black female country music performers?

JGalt

Diamond Member
Mar 9, 2011
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Has there ever been such a person? Some people would say that country music is a "racist" institution and that a black female would never make it in that business.

But remember Charlie Pride? I don't recall ever hearing any white person denigrating him because he was black. And he was a country music artist.

What gives? Is someone missing an opportunity here? In this age of politically-correct selective-ethnicity and selective-gender, would I become famous if I passed myself off as a black female and became a country music performer?

So many questions, so little time.
 
Has there ever been such a person? Some people would say that country music is a "racist" institution and that a black female would never make it in that business.

But remember Charlie Pride? I don't recall ever hearing any white person denigrating him because he was black. And he was a country music artist.

What gives? Is someone missing an opportunity here? In this age of politically-correct selective-ethnicity and selective-gender, would I become famous if I passed myself off as a black female and became a country music performer?

So many questions, so little time.
They don't need country music artists. They got Billie Holiday and Aretha Franklin and etc. etc.
 
Blues and country are the same music, that generally use the same studios and musicians so I would suspect that marketing is the answer.
 
I think probably the reason there are very few male black country singers, and zero female black country singers is because of the bias of the audience involved.
 
Has there ever been such a person? Some people would say that country music is a "racist" institution and that a black female would never make it in that business.

But remember Charlie Pride? I don't recall ever hearing any white person denigrating him because he was black. And he was a country music artist.

What gives? Is someone missing an opportunity here? In this age of politically-correct selective-ethnicity and selective-gender, would I become famous if I passed myself off as a black female and became a country music performer?

So many questions, so little time.
They don't need country music artists. They got Billie Holiday and Aretha Franklin and etc. etc.

That's blues and R&B. If the country music industry "doesn't need" black artists, especially female, why was Charley Pride as popular as he was?
 
Blues and country are the same music, that generally use the same studios and musicians so I would suspect that marketing is the answer.

I'm trying to figure out if you see no distinction between blues and country, or if you are saying that only the vocals are different in the two genres, or what.

Country music seems to have incorporated other musical genres: Rock, blues, and hip-hop.

While I can't say that I really like some of the "Hollywood" style country music that's coming out, it does seem to be evolving.
 
All musicians are composites of the many influences of their development.
Maybe not many black women have had their dawg up an' died, or their woman gorn and left.
 
Has there ever been such a person? Some people would say that country music is a "racist" institution and that a black female would never make it in that business.

But remember Charlie Pride? I don't recall ever hearing any white person denigrating him because he was black. And he was a country music artist.

What gives? Is someone missing an opportunity here? In this age of politically-correct selective-ethnicity and selective-gender, would I become famous if I passed myself off as a black female and became a country music performer?

So many questions, so little time.
They don't need country music artists. They got Billie Holiday and Aretha Franklin and etc. etc.

That's blues and R&B. If the country music industry "doesn't need" black artists, especially female, why was Charley Pride as popular as he was?
Blues and soul were the blacks' music, and country western is what the white folks came up with. Both talk about daily life, the pain, the small victories. I don't see what your question is actually about. Why do whites and blacks HAVE to cross over into each other's music to make you happy?
 


Let me reword that, there are no FAMOUS female black country western singers because of the audience involved.


Is that to say that people who like country music are predominantly "racist"? I'd have to disagree with you. Look at Kid Rock: He started out doing ghetto hip-hop, then morphed into a more "country music" style.

Younger listeners of country music aren't as racially biased as the traditional people were. They are made up of millennials, who lean more toward being conservatives and Republicans, instead of the old-school Democrats.
 


Let me reword that, there are no FAMOUS female black country western singers because of the audience involved.


Why is it the fault of the audience because black females can't sing country music?


Who says they can't?

Of course, audience bias is only one possible cause. Rather than bias, it may have to do more with audience demographics; if there aren't that many black country fans (and I have no idea if there are or not) that would make it less likely to find black country musicians.

Are there many non-white country artists in general?

I see this as similar to heavy metal, particularly the more extreme varieties. The audience tends to be mostly white, so the artists tend to be mostly white. There's no reason black, hispanic, Asian, Native American, or any other race/ethnicity can't perform the music. However, I imagine most musicians would play music they are a fan of, rather than trying to get into a genre they don't care for.

It's unfortunate, as music is something that I think should be "color-blind." Race and ethnicity have nothing to do with whether someone can enjoy music.

Apparently, there has been at least one female black country singer to get some popularity in recent years, Mickey Guyton. Mickey Guyton and the trailblazing black women of country music
 
Has there ever been such a person? Some people would say that country music is a "racist" institution and that a black female would never make it in that business.

But remember Charlie Pride? I don't recall ever hearing any white person denigrating him because he was black. And he was a country music artist.

What gives? Is someone missing an opportunity here? In this age of politically-correct selective-ethnicity and selective-gender, would I become famous if I passed myself off as a black female and became a country music performer?

So many questions, so little time.
They don't need country music artists. They got Billie Holiday and Aretha Franklin and etc. etc.

That's blues and R&B. If the country music industry "doesn't need" black artists, especially female, why was Charley Pride as popular as he was?
Blues and soul were the blacks' music, and country western is what the white folks came up with. Both talk about daily life, the pain, the small victories. I don't see what your question is actually about. Why do whites and blacks HAVE to cross over into each other's music to make you happy?

A statement like that show the subliminal racism that's been ingrained in your psyche. Are you suggesting artistic segregation? Where you you think Appalachian music and Bluegrass got its soul from? Have you even listened to any bluegrass or truly soulful Appalachian music?
 


Let me reword that, there are no FAMOUS female black country western singers because of the audience involved.


Why is it the fault of the audience because black females can't sing country music?


Who says they can't?

Of course, audience bias is only one possible cause. Rather than bias, it may have to do more with audience demographics; if there aren't that many black country fans (and I have no idea if there are or not) that would make it less likely to find black country musicians.

Are there many non-white country artists in general?

I see this as similar to heavy metal, particularly the more extreme varieties. The audience tends to be mostly white, so the artists tend to be mostly white. There's no reason black, hispanic, Asian, Native American, or any other race/ethnicity can't perform the music. However, I imagine most musicians would play music they are a fan of, rather than trying to get into a genre they don't care for.

It's unfortunate, as music is something that I think should be "color-blind." Race and ethnicity have nothing to do with whether someone can enjoy music.

Apparently, there has been at least one female black country singer to get some popularity in recent years, Mickey Guyton. Mickey Guyton and the trailblazing black women of country music


Where are all the black folks listening to country music in order to entice more black country singers?
 


Let me reword that, there are no FAMOUS female black country western singers because of the audience involved.


Why is it the fault of the audience because black females can't sing country music?


Who says they can't?

Of course, audience bias is only one possible cause. Rather than bias, it may have to do more with audience demographics; if there aren't that many black country fans (and I have no idea if there are or not) that would make it less likely to find black country musicians.

Are there many non-white country artists in general?

I see this as similar to heavy metal, particularly the more extreme varieties. The audience tends to be mostly white, so the artists tend to be mostly white. There's no reason black, hispanic, Asian, Native American, or any other race/ethnicity can't perform the music. However, I imagine most musicians would play music they are a fan of, rather than trying to get into a genre they don't care for.

It's unfortunate, as music is something that I think should be "color-blind." Race and ethnicity have nothing to do with whether someone can enjoy music.

Apparently, there has been at least one female black country singer to get some popularity in recent years, Mickey Guyton. Mickey Guyton and the trailblazing black women of country music


Nice.

I think the stigma lies in the fact that most black people have been programmed to believe that hillbilly music is "racist."
 


Let me reword that, there are no FAMOUS female black country western singers because of the audience involved.


Why is it the fault of the audience because black females can't sing country music?


Who says they can't?

Of course, audience bias is only one possible cause. Rather than bias, it may have to do more with audience demographics; if there aren't that many black country fans (and I have no idea if there are or not) that would make it less likely to find black country musicians.

Are there many non-white country artists in general?

I see this as similar to heavy metal, particularly the more extreme varieties. The audience tends to be mostly white, so the artists tend to be mostly white. There's no reason black, hispanic, Asian, Native American, or any other race/ethnicity can't perform the music. However, I imagine most musicians would play music they are a fan of, rather than trying to get into a genre they don't care for.

It's unfortunate, as music is something that I think should be "color-blind." Race and ethnicity have nothing to do with whether someone can enjoy music.

Apparently, there has been at least one female black country singer to get some popularity in recent years, Mickey Guyton. Mickey Guyton and the trailblazing black women of country music


Where are all the black folks listening to country music in order to entice more black country singers?


I lived in Dallas, Texas for 25 years. You'd be surprised at how many blacks were hillbillies. The mature ones, I mean. The younger ones are mostly hip-hop thugs.
 

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