Whar are your salary requirements?

sealybobo

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What do you say when a potential employer asks? What if they were gonna offer you more?
 

JoeMoma

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What do you say when a potential employer asks? What if they were gonna offer you more?
First, do some research to know what a reasonable salary. If this question is asked, offer a figure on the high end of what is reasonable. If the potential employer is truely interested, he will most likely make a counter offer. You can't haggle the salary up if you start with a low end figure. There is an art to negotiations such as this.
 

Darkwind

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What do you say when a potential employer asks? What if they were gonna offer you more?
How is it that you can be in a job interview and NOT know what the salary range for that job is going to be?

Do you homework before you even receive the first call.

If you want the job, you should know at a minimum, the following things.

Is the company publicly traded?
What product or service does the company provide
How well did the company do last year.
How many legal issues has the company had in the past ten years.
Who is in charge of Human Resources
What is the salary range of the job you are applying for....i.e....if you are a .net programmer, then salary.com will provide you a range of salaries by region.....

If you want a job, you have to work for it.
 

JakeStarkey

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Tell the interviewers what are your requirements, and let them know that will be re-evaluated in six months.
 
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sealybobo

sealybobo

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What do you say when a potential employer asks? What if they were gonna offer you more?
How is it that you can be in a job interview and NOT know what the salary range for that job is going to be?

Do you homework before you even receive the first call.

If you want the job, you should know at a minimum, the following things.

Is the company publicly traded?
What product or service does the company provide
How well did the company do last year.
How many legal issues has the company had in the past ten years.
Who is in charge of Human Resources
What is the salary range of the job you are applying for....i.e....if you are a .net programmer, then salary.com will provide you a range of salaries by region.....

If you want a job, you have to work for it.
I just saw the company real close to home and they weren't looking or no jobs were posted but I emed the boss BC his contact info was on the website. My resumes pretty impressive but I'm in sales. Could be high salary low commission or visa versa. I'd rather have big salary but I'm OK with low base high commish I told him my base now and just said plus bonus' and commissions so I hope I didn't screw myself out of $20k. Lol
 

Sonny Clark

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What do you say when a potential employer asks? What if they were gonna offer you more?
A lot of it has to do with the part of the country where the job is. I've lived and worked in 13 different states, and the pay scale for jobs vary according to location. For example, the pay scale for certain jobs is higher in New York City compared to the same job in rural Mississippi. Also, a lot has to do with experience, education, and the number of years that you've been doing that particular job. An industrial mechanic in Ohio makes more than the same job in South Carolina. A carpenter in southern California makes more than a carpenter in Alabama.

It never hurts to ask for what you want and what you expect. The employer may not agree, but at least you're not cheating yourself by asking for a lower wage than what you feel is fair. The employer will look at past pay history and see if you have been paid anywhere close to what you're asking. If you've been making $50,000 a year salary, and now you're asking for $90,000 a year salary, you may be asked to explain why you feel you should be making almost double what you were making.

In today's business environment, especially with the degree of competition looking for work, education and the number of years you've been doing a particular job weighs heavy. Always leave a job on good terms. You want positive feedback from past employers. Always let it be known that you're willing to take on more responsibility than what you've been doing, and it will increase your chances of getting what you ask for. The bottom line is to do a little research to find out what the going rate is before mentioning what salary you're expecting. Make sure that you're not completely out of the ball park when giving a pay range expected. And, never cheat yourself. Ask what is fair, and realize that what you have to offer has value.
 
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sealybobo

sealybobo

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Tell the interviewers what are your requirements, and let them know that will be re-evaluated in six months.
Fuck that. That's what my last boss did. They always want you to "show em what you got" before they give you a raise and they never gi
What do you say when a potential employer asks? What if they were gonna offer you more?
A lot of it has to do with the part of the country where the job is. I've lived and worked in 13 different states, and the pay scale for jobs vary according to location. For example, the pay scale for certain jobs is higher in New York City compared to the same job in rural Mississippi. Also, a lot has to do with experience, education, and the number of years that you've been doing that particular job. An industrial mechanic in Ohio makes more than the same job in South Carolina. A carpenter in southern California makes more than a carpenter in Alabama.

It never hurts to ask for what you want and what you expect. The employer may not agree, but at least you're not cheating yourself by asking for a lower wage than what you feel is fair. The employer will look at past pay history and see if you have been paid anywhere close to what you're asking. If you've been making $50,000 a year salary, and now you're asking for $90,000 a year salary, you may be asked to explain why you feel you should be making almost double what you were making.

In today's business environment, especially with the degree of competition looking for work, education and the number of years you've been doing a particular job weighs heavy. Always leave a job on good terms. You want positive feedback from past employers. Always let it be known that you're willing to take on more responsibility than what you've been doing, and it will increase your chances of getting what you ask for. The bottom line is to do a little research to find out what the going rate is before mentioning what salary you're expecting. Make sure that you're not completely out of the ball park when giving a pay range expected. And, never cheat yourself. Ask what is fair, and realize that what you have to offer has value.

One thing that seems unfair is to go off what I'm making now. Clearly if I'm looking I feel underpaid don't you think? I know a lot of guys who out of college found themselves making high salaries and my jobs are usually smaller salaries but commissions and bonus' are high. I don't want to do that anymore. I've got a lot of experience and am a helova worker. I should be making 6 figures not stuck in the 5s.

What you're suggesting is I make a lateral move. I want a better job not one just as good.

This is helping guys thanks.

Problem is I just sent them a letter saying I'd be interested in working close to home if they have anything I might be a good fit for and the boss said maybe what are your salary requirements.

I'll be honest they're probably a small automotive supplier but who knows what the job is or what it pays.

Anyways. This is why its good to have a job while looking. If they want me they'll offer me more.
 

Sonny Clark

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Tell the interviewers what are your requirements, and let them know that will be re-evaluated in six months.
Fuck that. That's what my last boss did. They always want you to "show em what you got" before they give you a raise and they never gi
What do you say when a potential employer asks? What if they were gonna offer you more?
A lot of it has to do with the part of the country where the job is. I've lived and worked in 13 different states, and the pay scale for jobs vary according to location. For example, the pay scale for certain jobs is higher in New York City compared to the same job in rural Mississippi. Also, a lot has to do with experience, education, and the number of years that you've been doing that particular job. An industrial mechanic in Ohio makes more than the same job in South Carolina. A carpenter in southern California makes more than a carpenter in Alabama.

It never hurts to ask for what you want and what you expect. The employer may not agree, but at least you're not cheating yourself by asking for a lower wage than what you feel is fair. The employer will look at past pay history and see if you have been paid anywhere close to what you're asking. If you've been making $50,000 a year salary, and now you're asking for $90,000 a year salary, you may be asked to explain why you feel you should be making almost double what you were making.

In today's business environment, especially with the degree of competition looking for work, education and the number of years you've been doing a particular job weighs heavy. Always leave a job on good terms. You want positive feedback from past employers. Always let it be known that you're willing to take on more responsibility than what you've been doing, and it will increase your chances of getting what you ask for. The bottom line is to do a little research to find out what the going rate is before mentioning what salary you're expecting. Make sure that you're not completely out of the ball park when giving a pay range expected. And, never cheat yourself. Ask what is fair, and realize that what you have to offer has value.

One thing that seems unfair is to go off what I'm making now. Clearly if I'm looking I feel underpaid don't you think? I know a lot of guys who out of college found themselves making high salaries and my jobs are usually smaller salaries but commissions and bonus' are high. I don't want to do that anymore. I've got a lot of experience and am a helova worker. I should be making 6 figures not stuck in the 5s.

What you're suggesting is I make a lateral move. I want a better job not one just as good.

This is helping guys thanks.

Problem is I just sent them a letter saying I'd be interested in working close to home if they have anything I might be a good fit for and the boss said maybe what are your salary requirements.

I'll be honest they're probably a small automotive supplier but who knows what the job is or what it pays.

Anyways. This is why its good to have a job while looking. If they want me they'll offer me more.
Good luck. I wish you well. Just remember, there's a lot of competition looking for those premium jobs also. Don't price yourself out of the market. Best of luck. Let us know how it pans out for you.
 
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sealybobo

sealybobo

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Tell the interviewers what are your requirements, and let them know that will be re-evaluated in six months.
Fuck that. That's what my last boss did. They always want you to "show em what you got" before they give you a raise and they never gi
What do you say when a potential employer asks? What if they were gonna offer you more?
A lot of it has to do with the part of the country where the job is. I've lived and worked in 13 different states, and the pay scale for jobs vary according to location. For example, the pay scale for certain jobs is higher in New York City compared to the same job in rural Mississippi. Also, a lot has to do with experience, education, and the number of years that you've been doing that particular job. An industrial mechanic in Ohio makes more than the same job in South Carolina. A carpenter in southern California makes more than a carpenter in Alabama.

It never hurts to ask for what you want and what you expect. The employer may not agree, but at least you're not cheating yourself by asking for a lower wage than what you feel is fair. The employer will look at past pay history and see if you have been paid anywhere close to what you're asking. If you've been making $50,000 a year salary, and now you're asking for $90,000 a year salary, you may be asked to explain why you feel you should be making almost double what you were making.

In today's business environment, especially with the degree of competition looking for work, education and the number of years you've been doing a particular job weighs heavy. Always leave a job on good terms. You want positive feedback from past employers. Always let it be known that you're willing to take on more responsibility than what you've been doing, and it will increase your chances of getting what you ask for. The bottom line is to do a little research to find out what the going rate is before mentioning what salary you're expecting. Make sure that you're not completely out of the ball park when giving a pay range expected. And, never cheat yourself. Ask what is fair, and realize that what you have to offer has value.

One thing that seems unfair is to go off what I'm making now. Clearly if I'm looking I feel underpaid don't you think? I know a lot of guys who out of college found themselves making high salaries and my jobs are usually smaller salaries but commissions and bonus' are high. I don't want to do that anymore. I've got a lot of experience and am a helova worker. I should be making 6 figures not stuck in the 5s.

What you're suggesting is I make a lateral move. I want a better job not one just as good.

This is helping guys thanks.

Problem is I just sent them a letter saying I'd be interested in working close to home if they have anything I might be a good fit for and the boss said maybe what are your salary requirements.

I'll be honest they're probably a small automotive supplier but who knows what the job is or what it pays.

Anyways. This is why its good to have a job while looking. If they want me they'll offer me more.
Good luck. I wish you well. Just remember, there's a lot of competition looking for those premium jobs also. Don't price yourself out of the market. Best of luck. Let us know how it pans out for you.
I would love it if this were both close to home and better pay. I'll be happy if its not the kind of sales job where they raise the quota every month and turnover is very high.

Every company I've ever worked for seemed to have 99% turnover. This company bragged on their website they out employees first.

And if I can make $10k more and be right down the road would be great.
 

Sonny Clark

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Tell the interviewers what are your requirements, and let them know that will be re-evaluated in six months.
Fuck that. That's what my last boss did. They always want you to "show em what you got" before they give you a raise and they never gi
What do you say when a potential employer asks? What if they were gonna offer you more?
A lot of it has to do with the part of the country where the job is. I've lived and worked in 13 different states, and the pay scale for jobs vary according to location. For example, the pay scale for certain jobs is higher in New York City compared to the same job in rural Mississippi. Also, a lot has to do with experience, education, and the number of years that you've been doing that particular job. An industrial mechanic in Ohio makes more than the same job in South Carolina. A carpenter in southern California makes more than a carpenter in Alabama.

It never hurts to ask for what you want and what you expect. The employer may not agree, but at least you're not cheating yourself by asking for a lower wage than what you feel is fair. The employer will look at past pay history and see if you have been paid anywhere close to what you're asking. If you've been making $50,000 a year salary, and now you're asking for $90,000 a year salary, you may be asked to explain why you feel you should be making almost double what you were making.

In today's business environment, especially with the degree of competition looking for work, education and the number of years you've been doing a particular job weighs heavy. Always leave a job on good terms. You want positive feedback from past employers. Always let it be known that you're willing to take on more responsibility than what you've been doing, and it will increase your chances of getting what you ask for. The bottom line is to do a little research to find out what the going rate is before mentioning what salary you're expecting. Make sure that you're not completely out of the ball park when giving a pay range expected. And, never cheat yourself. Ask what is fair, and realize that what you have to offer has value.

One thing that seems unfair is to go off what I'm making now. Clearly if I'm looking I feel underpaid don't you think? I know a lot of guys who out of college found themselves making high salaries and my jobs are usually smaller salaries but commissions and bonus' are high. I don't want to do that anymore. I've got a lot of experience and am a helova worker. I should be making 6 figures not stuck in the 5s.

What you're suggesting is I make a lateral move. I want a better job not one just as good.

This is helping guys thanks.

Problem is I just sent them a letter saying I'd be interested in working close to home if they have anything I might be a good fit for and the boss said maybe what are your salary requirements.

I'll be honest they're probably a small automotive supplier but who knows what the job is or what it pays.

Anyways. This is why its good to have a job while looking. If they want me they'll offer me more.
Good luck. I wish you well. Just remember, there's a lot of competition looking for those premium jobs also. Don't price yourself out of the market. Best of luck. Let us know how it pans out for you.
I would love it if this were both close to home and better pay. I'll be happy if its not the kind of sales job where they raise the quota every month and turnover is very high.

Every company I've ever worked for seemed to have 99% turnover. This company bragged on their website they out employees first.

And if I can make $10k more and be right down the road would be great.
Go for it. You never know what might happen. An honest effort is better than no effort at all.
 

Nutz

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Work for yourself...fuck a boss.
 
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sealybobo

sealybobo

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Work for yourself...fuck a boss.
I do that too but I need a real job with benefits. I own a home construction paint tile work hard wood floor finish basements and bathrooms business. I do sales Mon thru Fri and sometimes work Saturdays and Sundays manual labor when the guys need me. I have 2 friends who are master carpenters they can do anything.

But until it pays more I need to be making a corporate salary and benefits.

My brother is a VP makes somewhere between 500 and a mill working for someone else. Should he open a subway?
 

Nutz

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Work for yourself...fuck a boss.
I do that too but I need a real job with benefits. I own a home construction paint tile work hard wood floor finish basements and bathrooms business. I do sales Mon thru Fri and sometimes work Saturdays and Sundays manual labor when the guys need me. I have 2 friends who are master carpenters they can do anything.

But until it pays more I need to be making a corporate salary and benefits.

My brother is a VP makes somewhere between 500 and a mill working for someone else. Should he open a subway?
So you are familiar with independent contractors! Independent contractors are your best sales people...they only live if they get you business!


(fag)
 
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sealybobo

sealybobo

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Work for yourself...fuck a boss.
I do that too but I need a real job with benefits. I own a home construction paint tile work hard wood floor finish basements and bathrooms business. I do sales Mon thru Fri and sometimes work Saturdays and Sundays manual labor when the guys need me. I have 2 friends who are master carpenters they can do anything.

But until it pays more I need to be making a corporate salary and benefits.

My brother is a VP makes somewhere between 500 and a mill working for someone else. Should he open a subway?
So you are familiar with independent contractors! Independent contractors are your best sales people...they only live if they get you business!


(fag)
They warned us not to teach you people to read. Lol
 
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sealybobo

sealybobo

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Tell the interviewers what are your requirements, and let them know that will be re-evaluated in six months.
Fuck that. That's what my last boss did. They always want you to "show em what you got" before they give you a raise and they never gi
What do you say when a potential employer asks? What if they were gonna offer you more?
A lot of it has to do with the part of the country where the job is. I've lived and worked in 13 different states, and the pay scale for jobs vary according to location. For example, the pay scale for certain jobs is higher in New York City compared to the same job in rural Mississippi. Also, a lot has to do with experience, education, and the number of years that you've been doing that particular job. An industrial mechanic in Ohio makes more than the same job in South Carolina. A carpenter in southern California makes more than a carpenter in Alabama.

It never hurts to ask for what you want and what you expect. The employer may not agree, but at least you're not cheating yourself by asking for a lower wage than what you feel is fair. The employer will look at past pay history and see if you have been paid anywhere close to what you're asking. If you've been making $50,000 a year salary, and now you're asking for $90,000 a year salary, you may be asked to explain why you feel you should be making almost double what you were making.

In today's business environment, especially with the degree of competition looking for work, education and the number of years you've been doing a particular job weighs heavy. Always leave a job on good terms. You want positive feedback from past employers. Always let it be known that you're willing to take on more responsibility than what you've been doing, and it will increase your chances of getting what you ask for. The bottom line is to do a little research to find out what the going rate is before mentioning what salary you're expecting. Make sure that you're not completely out of the ball park when giving a pay range expected. And, never cheat yourself. Ask what is fair, and realize that what you have to offer has value.

One thing that seems unfair is to go off what I'm making now. Clearly if I'm looking I feel underpaid don't you think? I know a lot of guys who out of college found themselves making high salaries and my jobs are usually smaller salaries but commissions and bonus' are high. I don't want to do that anymore. I've got a lot of experience and am a helova worker. I should be making 6 figures not stuck in the 5s.

What you're suggesting is I make a lateral move. I want a better job not one just as good.

This is helping guys thanks.

Problem is I just sent them a letter saying I'd be interested in working close to home if they have anything I might be a good fit for and the boss said maybe what are your salary requirements.

I'll be honest they're probably a small automotive supplier but who knows what the job is or what it pays.

Anyways. This is why its good to have a job while looking. If they want me they'll offer me more.
Good luck. I wish you well. Just remember, there's a lot of competition looking for those premium jobs also. Don't price yourself out of the market. Best of luck. Let us know how it pans out for you.
Whatever I said he wants to meet me next week! Thanks for your help.
 
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sealybobo

sealybobo

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Work for yourself...fuck a boss.
I do that too but I need a real job with benefits. I own a home construction paint tile work hard wood floor finish basements and bathrooms business. I do sales Mon thru Fri and sometimes work Saturdays and Sundays manual labor when the guys need me. I have 2 friends who are master carpenters they can do anything.

But until it pays more I need to be making a corporate salary and benefits.

My brother is a VP makes somewhere between 500 and a mill working for someone else. Should he open a subway?
So you are familiar with independent contractors! Independent contractors are your best sales people...they only live if they get you business!


(fag)
I got an interview. If I get the job I'll blow you. Lol
 

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