We’ll all die one day. Isn’t it time we got used to the idea?

Mindful

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" I’m writing this after hearing an apparently innocuous and encouraging snippet of news – that a new lung cancer treatment is capable of giving sufferers a possible “extra 200 days” of life. Another morning, another “battle against cancer” fought, and in this case won – sort of.

Yet I find myself rather in sympathy with the one in five Dutch doctors who, it was reported this week, would consider helping someone die even if they had no physical problems but were “tired of living”. Because these doctors have the maturity to face the fact that life has a natural end.

The wearying truth is, there are just so many “battles”, and they appear to be multiplying all the time. A new drug to treat strokes. A breakthrough in the “war” against heart disease. A promising initiative on Alzheimer’s. We are fed, daily, the hopeful news: fatal disease is slowly on the retreat. But there’s always one more, and sooner or later we all lose."

We ll all die one day. Isn t it time we got used to the idea Tim Lott Comment is free The Guardian
 
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Mindful

Mindful

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" I watch the runners on Hampstead Heath every day puffing and panting – suffering – in order to put off the big event, and while I admire them, I wonder if it isn’t all in vain. As a recent study on cancer at Johns Hopkins University revealed, lifestyle is somewhat overrated as a panacea for extending life. Researchers found that more than two-thirds of cancers are driven by random mistakes in cell division that are completely outside our control. And beyond that, there are genetic predispositions, also outside our control."
 

Mad_Cabbie

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I never use any other barometer for progress other than my own vision of how my existence might become even more decadent.
 

Mad_Cabbie

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In my early years I feared death, but reconciled my dying by believing that I was Immortal in spirit. I missed out on it's true import; not comprehending life's finality and the gift of being a mortal creation ~
 
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Mr Clean

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You'll never get out of this life alive.
 

Delta4Embassy

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" I’m writing this after hearing an apparently innocuous and encouraging snippet of news – that a new lung cancer treatment is capable of giving sufferers a possible “extra 200 days” of life. Another morning, another “battle against cancer” fought, and in this case won – sort of.

Yet I find myself rather in sympathy with the one in five Dutch doctors who, it was reported this week, would consider helping someone die even if they had no physical problems but were “tired of living”. Because these doctors have the maturity to face the fact that life has a natural end.

The wearying truth is, there are just so many “battles”, and they appear to be multiplying all the time. A new drug to treat strokes. A breakthrough in the “war” against heart disease. A promising initiative on Alzheimer’s. We are fed, daily, the hopeful news: fatal disease is slowly on the retreat. But there’s always one more, and sooner or later we all lose."

We ll all die one day. Isn t it time we got used to the idea Tim Lott Comment is free The Guardian
Because we do eventually die, the point of living and grabbing onto as much time as we can then is to help others. If we only lives our lives for our own benefit, our lives are meaningless. To to give ourselves meaning and a reason to go on living, we should be helping others.
 
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Mindful

Mindful

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" I’m writing this after hearing an apparently innocuous and encouraging snippet of news – that a new lung cancer treatment is capable of giving sufferers a possible “extra 200 days” of life. Another morning, another “battle against cancer” fought, and in this case won – sort of.

Yet I find myself rather in sympathy with the one in five Dutch doctors who, it was reported this week, would consider helping someone die even if they had no physical problems but were “tired of living”. Because these doctors have the maturity to face the fact that life has a natural end.

The wearying truth is, there are just so many “battles”, and they appear to be multiplying all the time. A new drug to treat strokes. A breakthrough in the “war” against heart disease. A promising initiative on Alzheimer’s. We are fed, daily, the hopeful news: fatal disease is slowly on the retreat. But there’s always one more, and sooner or later we all lose."

We ll all die one day. Isn t it time we got used to the idea Tim Lott Comment is free The Guardian
Because we do eventually die, the point of living and grabbing onto as much time as we can then is to help others. If we only lives our lives for our own benefit, our lives are meaningless. To to give ourselves meaning and a reason to go on living, we should be helping others.
I don't want to die. I'm still deluding myself I shall live forever, that I have control. Even though my brain tells me otherwise.
 

Delta4Embassy

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" I’m writing this after hearing an apparently innocuous and encouraging snippet of news – that a new lung cancer treatment is capable of giving sufferers a possible “extra 200 days” of life. Another morning, another “battle against cancer” fought, and in this case won – sort of.

Yet I find myself rather in sympathy with the one in five Dutch doctors who, it was reported this week, would consider helping someone die even if they had no physical problems but were “tired of living”. Because these doctors have the maturity to face the fact that life has a natural end.

The wearying truth is, there are just so many “battles”, and they appear to be multiplying all the time. A new drug to treat strokes. A breakthrough in the “war” against heart disease. A promising initiative on Alzheimer’s. We are fed, daily, the hopeful news: fatal disease is slowly on the retreat. But there’s always one more, and sooner or later we all lose."

We ll all die one day. Isn t it time we got used to the idea Tim Lott Comment is free The Guardian
Because we do eventually die, the point of living and grabbing onto as much time as we can then is to help others. If we only lives our lives for our own benefit, our lives are meaningless. To to give ourselves meaning and a reason to go on living, we should be helping others.
I don't want to die. I'm still deluding myself I shall live forever, that I have control. Even though my brain tells me otherwise.
No one free of mental illness wants to die. It sucks we have to. But for myself I've found solace in that nothing in the universe lasts forever. Death or ending is by design and necessary. When stars "die" they release all the matter that made them up to become part of other things. In dying then they ensure new life and things can come to be using that material.

When we die and decompose, the atoms that made up our bodies are free to become part of other things, living and non-living both. While our individuality is gone (probably) everything that actually comprised our bodies remains. Atoms don't blip out of existence because the organism died, they simply become free to become part of other things.

If the individuality that's lost lived well, and was an asset and not a liability, the individuality will be honored with remembrance. That's the very best anyone can hope for, to be remembered. And the goal we should strive for. Hopefully the remembrance is positive and not because we did somethign very naughty. :)
 
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Mindful

Mindful

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" I’m writing this after hearing an apparently innocuous and encouraging snippet of news – that a new lung cancer treatment is capable of giving sufferers a possible “extra 200 days” of life. Another morning, another “battle against cancer” fought, and in this case won – sort of.

Yet I find myself rather in sympathy with the one in five Dutch doctors who, it was reported this week, would consider helping someone die even if they had no physical problems but were “tired of living”. Because these doctors have the maturity to face the fact that life has a natural end.

The wearying truth is, there are just so many “battles”, and they appear to be multiplying all the time. A new drug to treat strokes. A breakthrough in the “war” against heart disease. A promising initiative on Alzheimer’s. We are fed, daily, the hopeful news: fatal disease is slowly on the retreat. But there’s always one more, and sooner or later we all lose."

We ll all die one day. Isn t it time we got used to the idea Tim Lott Comment is free The Guardian
Because we do eventually die, the point of living and grabbing onto as much time as we can then is to help others. If we only lives our lives for our own benefit, our lives are meaningless. To to give ourselves meaning and a reason to go on living, we should be helping others.
I don't want to die. I'm still deluding myself I shall live forever, that I have control. Even though my brain tells me otherwise.
No one free of mental illness wants to die. It sucks we have to. But for myself I've found solace in that nothing in the universe lasts forever. Death or ending is by design and necessary. When stars "die" they release all the matter that made them up to become part of other things. In dying then they ensure new life and things can come to be using that material.

When we die and decompose, the atoms that made up our bodies are free to become part of other things, living and non-living both. While our individuality is gone (probably) everything that actually comprised our bodies remains. Atoms don't blip out of existence because the organism died, they simply become free to become part of other things.

If the individuality that's lost lived well, and was an asset and not a liability, the individuality will be honored with remembrance. That's the very best anyone can hope for, to be remembered. And the goal we should strive for. Hopefully the remembrance is positive and not because we did somethign very naughty. :)
I know. I still think I'm immortal. The Gods will punish me for such hubris.

We invent our own hypotheses, of how we should or should not be. To live a worthwhile life. And that might be another invented aspiration with which to kid ourselves. The most difficult thing seems to be to live in the moment.

Why were we given, or cursed with, brains that over think things?
 
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Mindful

Mindful

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Recently turning 60 kinda fucked with my head. Oofah.
Have regrets set in yet?

It was only yesterday when I was lying on the lawn in the back garden, gazing up at the sky, projecting into the future, which seemed to stretch on endlessly.
 

Mr. H.

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Recently turning 60 kinda fucked with my head. Oofah.
Have regrets set in yet?

It was only yesterday when I was lying on the lawn in the back garden, gazing up at the sky, projecting into the future, which seemed to stretch on endlessly.
Regret is fleeting. It comes and goes.

What were you doing laying in the grass? Did you have a heart attack?
 
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Mindful

Mindful

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Recently turning 60 kinda fucked with my head. Oofah.
Have regrets set in yet?

It was only yesterday when I was lying on the lawn in the back garden, gazing up at the sky, projecting into the future, which seemed to stretch on endlessly.
Regret is fleeting. It comes and goes.

What were you doing laying in the grass? Did you have a heart attack?
English people do that sort of thing. On hot summer days.
 

chikenwing

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" I watch the runners on Hampstead Heath every day puffing and panting – suffering – in order to put off the big event, and while I admire them, I wonder if it isn’t all in vain. As a recent study on cancer at Johns Hopkins University revealed, lifestyle is somewhat overrated as a panacea for extending life. Researchers found that more than two-thirds of cancers are driven by random mistakes in cell division that are completely outside our control. And beyond that, there are genetic predispositions, also outside our control."
That is exactly what my oncologist told me about mine. Now eating right sensible exercise are a good thing,but not a for sure thing at all.
 

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