USA goods could be competitively priced

Supposn

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USA goods could be competitively priced:

It's paradoxical that those choosing to purchase foreign products (usually correctly) believe they're acting in their individual best interests, but annual trade deficits are net detrimental to their nation's economy.

Purchasers of foreign goods gain no competitive advantage which is the only commercial advantage.

[Within USA's existing environments', (i.e. our federal laws and policies):

Enterprises that do not obtain the best values for the costs, place themselves at competitive disadvantage.
Similarly, purchasers spending on behalf of their families, fail to serve them best if they fail to obtain the best values for their costs.
But cheaper foreign goods do not net compensate for our lesser GDP and numbers of jobs due to our trade deficits of goods.

Behaviors adjust to modified environments; its easier to change a nation's laws, rather than attempting to change human nature.
If the USA adopts the global trade policy described within Wikipedia’s article entitled “Import Certificates”, the best interests of USA's individual persons and enterprises would coincide with our nation's best economic interests.

Refer to Wikipedia’s article entitled “Import Certificates”.

Respectfully, Supposn
 

Toddsterpatriot

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Or we could reduce taxes and regulations to make our domestic production more competitive.
 

anotherlife

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Isn't it the dollar exchange rate that determines the price of American work worldwide, by far?
 

EdwardBaiamonte

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Isn't it the dollar exchange rate that determines the price of American work worldwide, by far?
no no Bangladesh China Vietnam are very poor countries meaning their workers earn a tiny amount and can afford to buy a tiny amount compared to Americans.
Because they earn a tiny amount they produce goods cheaply. Exchange rates have little or nothing to do with it.
 
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Supposn

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but annual trade deficits are net detrimental to their nation's economy.
How so?
Econ4Every1, exports directly contribute and imports directly reduce their nation's balance of trade (i.e. net exports). A trade surplus is positive net balance of trade, and a trade deficit is a negative net balance of trade. Due to balance of trade being explicitly added to the calculation of their nation's gross domestic product using the expenditure method of calculating gross domestic production (i.e. GDP), trade surpluses are contributions and trade deficits are "drags" upon their nation's GDP.

Trade deficits' drag upon their nation's GDP particular drag upon their numbers of jobs.

Respectfully, Supposn
 
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Supposn

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Isn't it the dollar exchange rate that determines the price of American work worldwide, by far?
AnotherLife, regardless of to what you attribute USA's chronic global trade deficits of goods, they are net detrimental to our GDP and numbers of jobs.

Respectfully, Supposn
 
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Supposn

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Isn't it the dollar exchange rate that determines the price of American work worldwide, by far?
no no Bangladesh China Vietnam are very poor countries meaning their workers earn a tiny amount and can afford to buy a tiny amount compared to Americans.
Because they earn a tiny amount they produce goods cheaply. Exchange rates have little or nothing to do with it.
EdwardBaiamonte, the Import Certificates trade policy is substantially market rather than government driven.
It does not discriminate among foreign nations or determine what's shipped where and at what price.
It does not intervene with the values of specifically designated scarce or precious mineral materials that may be integral to global goods being shipped, but otherwise it will not tolerate its nation experiencing an annual global trade deficit of goods. All shipments' values are determined and expressed as within USA ports and in U.S. Dollars.
Respectfully, Supposn
 

anotherlife

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Isn't it the dollar exchange rate that determines the price of American work worldwide, by far?
no no Bangladesh China Vietnam are very poor countries meaning their workers earn a tiny amount and can afford to buy a tiny amount compared to Americans.
Because they earn a tiny amount they produce goods cheaply. Exchange rates have little or nothing to do with it.
If a Bangladesh guy and a USA guy sell the same thing internationally, and Bangladesh drops its currency exchange by a factor of 10, then the USA guy must work 10 times harder to survive. Then, if Bangladesh drops it by a 1000 ... You see what I mean?
 

anotherlife

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Isn't it the dollar exchange rate that determines the price of American work worldwide, by far?
AnotherLife, regardless of to what you attribute USA's chronic global trade deficits of goods, they are net detrimental to our GDP and numbers of jobs.

Respectfully, Supposn
The USA trade deficit may be a problem, but why does the GDP matter? The GDP is an index that is valid only for the manufacturing sector. Only third world countries have dominant manufacturing sectors, it is negligibly small in the USA.
 

anotherlife

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Isn't it the dollar exchange rate that determines the price of American work worldwide, by far?
no no Bangladesh China Vietnam are very poor countries meaning their workers earn a tiny amount and can afford to buy a tiny amount compared to Americans.
Because they earn a tiny amount they produce goods cheaply. Exchange rates have little or nothing to do with it.
EdwardBaiamonte, the Import Certificates trade policy is substantially market rather than government driven.
It does not discriminate among foreign nations or determine what's shipped where and at what price.
It does not intervene with the values of specifically designated scarce or precious mineral materials that may be integral to global goods being shipped, but otherwise it will not tolerate its nation experiencing an annual global trade deficit of goods. All shipments' values are determined and expressed as within USA ports and in U.S. Dollars.
Respectfully, Supposn
These kinds of red tape laws are generally detrimental to imports. In the global supply chain, they then slow down export too.
 

Toddsterpatriot

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Isn't it the dollar exchange rate that determines the price of American work worldwide, by far?
no no Bangladesh China Vietnam are very poor countries meaning their workers earn a tiny amount and can afford to buy a tiny amount compared to Americans.
Because they earn a tiny amount they produce goods cheaply. Exchange rates have little or nothing to do with it.
If a Bangladesh guy and a USA guy sell the same thing internationally, and Bangladesh drops its currency exchange by a factor of 10, then the USA guy must work 10 times harder to survive. Then, if Bangladesh drops it by a 1000 ... You see what I mean?
If a Bangladesh guy and a USA guy sell the same thing internationally, and Bangladesh drops its currency exchange by a factor of 10, then the USA guy must work 10 times harder to survive.

So they'll pay 10 times as much to import their raw materials. How is that helpful?
 

anotherlife

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Isn't it the dollar exchange rate that determines the price of American work worldwide, by far?
no no Bangladesh China Vietnam are very poor countries meaning their workers earn a tiny amount and can afford to buy a tiny amount compared to Americans.
Because they earn a tiny amount they produce goods cheaply. Exchange rates have little or nothing to do with it.
If a Bangladesh guy and a USA guy sell the same thing internationally, and Bangladesh drops its currency exchange by a factor of 10, then the USA guy must work 10 times harder to survive. Then, if Bangladesh drops it by a 1000 ... You see what I mean?
If a Bangladesh guy and a USA guy sell the same thing internationally, and Bangladesh drops its currency exchange by a factor of 10, then the USA guy must work 10 times harder to survive.

So they'll pay 10 times as much to import their raw materials. How is that helpful?
But it is the cost of labor that is dominant, so the raw materials is only a tiny percentage.
 

EdwardBaiamonte

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Isn't it the dollar exchange rate that determines the price of American work worldwide, by far?
no no Bangladesh China Vietnam are very poor countries meaning their workers earn a tiny amount and can afford to buy a tiny amount compared to Americans.
Because they earn a tiny amount they produce goods cheaply. Exchange rates have little or nothing to do with it.
If a Bangladesh guy and a USA guy sell the same thing internationally, and Bangladesh drops its currency exchange by a factor of 10, then the USA guy must work 10 times harder to survive. Then, if Bangladesh drops it by a 1000 ... You see what I mean?
seems like Bangladesh has all the advantages because they can set exchange rates for their currency wherever they want and yet they live on $120/ month in dire poverty. I guess it's not working and they are not going to get rich by fiddling with their exchange rates.
 

EdwardBaiamonte

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The GDP is an index that is valid only for the manufacturing sector.
more pretending you took Econ 101 and being laughed at by those who did? GDP is a measure of goods and services. As consumers we want both goods and services equally and want to consume more and more of both all the time.
 

anotherlife

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Isn't it the dollar exchange rate that determines the price of American work worldwide, by far?
no no Bangladesh China Vietnam are very poor countries meaning their workers earn a tiny amount and can afford to buy a tiny amount compared to Americans.
Because they earn a tiny amount they produce goods cheaply. Exchange rates have little or nothing to do with it.
If a Bangladesh guy and a USA guy sell the same thing internationally, and Bangladesh drops its currency exchange by a factor of 10, then the USA guy must work 10 times harder to survive. Then, if Bangladesh drops it by a 1000 ... You see what I mean?
seems like Bangladesh has all the advantages because they can set exchange rates for their currency wherever they want and yet they live on $120/ month in dire poverty. I guess it's not working and they are not going to get rich by fiddling with their exchange rates.
$120/mo is more than what I thought they make. Most of their consumption is domestic farming with wooden hoes, so none of that is a problem. The very few bangladeshians that can talk to westerners have the niche to profit from this exchange rate game. Every country plays this game.
 

anotherlife

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The GDP is an index that is valid only for the manufacturing sector.
more pretending you took Econ 101 and being laughed at by those who did? GDP is a measure of goods and services. As consumers we want both goods and services equally and want to consume more and more of both all the time.
No, because for example for England, that gross domestic production is made almost entirely by the City of London banking deals. So that is not a descriptor, unless you pick a country that is mostly manufacturing, such as China.
 

EdwardBaiamonte

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Every country plays this game.
and $120/month shows they are winning it?? If you were king in the stone age would your platform have been: we can get rich by manipulating our currency; vote for me. This is the liberal IQ at work.
 
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