The Great Salt Lake Is Full of Lithium. A Startup Wants to Harvest It.

Magnus

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Jun 22, 2020
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America’s biggest saltwater lake may hold a key to the country’s energy future.

This summer, a California startup plans to start construction on a project to suck up water from the Great Salt Lake to extract one of its many valuable minerals: lithium, a critical ingredient in the rechargeable batteries used in electric vehicles. The water will then be reinjected back into the lake, which Lilac Solutions says addresses concerns about the damaging effects of mineral extraction.

At its peak, Lilac says it will use a series of pipes to suck up 80,000 gallons of water a minute to harvest the mineral. The company plans to eventually produce up to 20,000 tons of battery-grade lithium a year at its site in northern Utah, located among fields of cattle and pickleweed.

The effort is one of dozens of projects across the U.S. racing to build up a domestic supply of lithium and other battery minerals, with adoption of electric vehicles expected to boom as part of the country’s transition to cleaner energy.

The challenge: finding ways to efficiently extract the mineral from rocks and water while minimizing environmental damage.

Resources in the U.S. are very large in scale, but the chemistry is very challenging,” said Lilac founder and Chief Executive Dave Snydacker.


This is good news because the United States has significant lithium reserves - the U.S. is home to one of the largest lithium deposits in the world. Nevada, North Carolina, and California have an estimated 4% of the world's lithium reserves.
 
The idea of helping out a Republican state like Utah- I can't see Sleepy Joe doing it.

My suspicion is that environmentalist whackos will find a reason why we don't want to disturb the delicate ecosystem of the Great Salt Lake.
 
America’s biggest saltwater lake may hold a key to the country’s energy future.

This summer, a California startup plans to start construction on a project to suck up water from the Great Salt Lake to extract one of its many valuable minerals: lithium, a critical ingredient in the rechargeable batteries used in electric vehicles. The water will then be reinjected back into the lake, which Lilac Solutions says addresses concerns about the damaging effects of mineral extraction.

At its peak, Lilac says it will use a series of pipes to suck up 80,000 gallons of water a minute to harvest the mineral. The company plans to eventually produce up to 20,000 tons of battery-grade lithium a year at its site in northern Utah, located among fields of cattle and pickleweed.

The effort is one of dozens of projects across the U.S. racing to build up a domestic supply of lithium and other battery minerals, with adoption of electric vehicles expected to boom as part of the country’s transition to cleaner energy.

The challenge: finding ways to efficiently extract the mineral from rocks and water while minimizing environmental damage.

Resources in the U.S. are very large in scale, but the chemistry is very challenging,” said Lilac founder and Chief Executive Dave Snydacker.


This is good news because the United States has significant lithium reserves - the U.S. is home to one of the largest lithium deposits in the world. Nevada, North Carolina, and California have an estimated 4% of the world's lithium reserves.
Does this indicate you support "mining" finite resources from the Earth, with most likely ecosystem impacts?
 
It's not the smell of salt you smell, it's the smell of .gov subsidized grift in the air.
Afghanistan has over 1,400 mineral fields, containing barite, chromite, coal, copper, gold, iron ore, lead, natural gas, petroleum, precious and semi-precious stones, salt, sulfur, lithium, talc, and zinc, among many other minerals. Gemstones include high-quality emeralds, lapis lazuli, red garnet and ruby.
 
Afghanistan has over 1,400 mineral fields, containing barite, chromite, coal, copper, gold, iron ore, lead, natural gas, petroleum, precious and semi-precious stones, salt, sulfur, lithium, talc, and zinc, among many other minerals. Gemstones include high-quality emeralds, lapis lazuli, red garnet and ruby.
What the blue fuck does that have to do with grift at a lake in UT? :dunno:
 
Afghanistan has over 1,400 mineral fields, containing barite, chromite, coal, copper, gold, iron ore, lead, natural gas, petroleum, precious and semi-precious stones, salt, sulfur, lithium, talc, and zinc, among many other minerals. Gemstones include high-quality emeralds, lapis lazuli, red garnet and ruby.
If I may . . .

Afghanistan likely feel a mix of anger and scorn towards the U.S. arguably, we brought that on ourselves across multiple administrations.

So, what they have or don’t is irrelevant to us. We won’t get it.

At least our politicians haven’t yet managed to turn Utah against us.
 

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