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Texas man fatally shoots 11-year-old daughter while hunting, authorities say

Vastator

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Hunting accidents happen every year. Four basic rules.
And have been ever present long before guns came about...
 

JGalt

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Aside from street thugs and criminals, some of the most irresponsible gun owners are hunters. I'm not knocking hunting, but the biggest portion of your average hunters aren't really gun people. They don't carry a weapon every day, many of them don't even own an AR-15 or an AK-47, and they don't shoot much. If they own a handgun for self-protection, it usually stays locked up, unloaded, or resides in a drawer.

They're what's known as in the gun culture as Fudds. Once a year they break out their bolt or lever-action rifle that belonged to their father/grandfather, put a couple rounds through it at the gun range, shoot a deer or two, then put their rifle away until next year. Most of them don't have a clue as to the proper maintenance, cleaning, and care of their rifles. Trust me, I've seen enough beat up old rusty guns at the public range. I've had to chew a few asses out for the way they don't observe where their muzzle is pointing. That's why I threw together a range in my back yard, so I don't have to be around those jokers.
 
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Otis Mayfield

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Why can't we require hunter safety training?

Or gun training for that matter?

"Don't point the end with hole at anyone, ever."

"If you think your gun is unloaded, treat it like it isn't."

"If you see the bushes shaking, make sure it's a deer before you shoot."

"Don't leave a loaded gun around unsupervised kids." (toddlers kill like 30 people a year.)
 
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2aguy

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Why can't we require hunter safety training?

Or gun training for that matter?

"Don't point the end with hole at anyone, ever."

"If you think your gun is unloaded, treat it like it isn't."

"If you see the bushes shaking, make sure it's a deer before you shoot."

"Don't leave a loaded gun around unsupervised kids." (toddlers kill like 30 people a year.)

Hunter safety training...yes. Gun safety training, no. Owning and carrying a gun is a Right, and mandatory training cannot be used to deny the exercise of a Right.....democrats used Poll Taxes and Literacy tests to keep blacks from voting...they will use any mandatory training requirement as a way to keep people from owning and carrying guns....
 

M14 Shooter

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M14 Shooter

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Why can't we require hunter safety training?
Most states do.
Or gun training for that matter?
Because the right to keep and bear arms is a right protected by the constitution.'
The state can no more require training to own a gun than it can traing to have an abortion, publish a news story, become a member of a clergy - or vote.
 

JGalt

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Why can't we require hunter safety training?

Or gun training for that matter?

"Don't point the end with hole at anyone, ever."

"If you think your gun is unloaded, treat it like it isn't."

"If you see the bushes shaking, make sure it's a deer before you shoot."

"Don't leave a loaded gun around unsupervised kids." (toddlers kill like 30 people a year.)

Hunter safety won't prevent accidents from happening. I've been a hunter, shooter, reloader, collector, trader and even repair them on a personal basis. I've owned hundreds of guns throughout my lifetime, starting back in the early 60's. Shot hundreds of thousands of rounds, mostly at targets or training.

And in spite of that, even I've had 5 accidental discharges during my lifetime. I still don't know where the 9mm slug went after that last one I had in the garage, a few months ago. It's buried somewhere in those shelves full of shit I have out there.

But I have started using a 5-gallon bucket full of sand to clear a weapon in. :laughing0301:

garage.jpg
 

SavannahMann

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A Texas man fatally shot his 11-year-old daughter Saturday in what appears to have been a hunting accident, officials said.

The child was identified as Daisy Grace Lynn George, a sixth-grader in junior high school in the Hallsville Independent School District, Harrison County Sheriff’s Capt. Tyler Owen said.


Harrison County is in northeastern Texas along the Louisiana border.

The girl’s father, who has not been publicly identified, has not been charged with any crimes, Owen said. The man was hunting when he was unloading a high-powered rifle, which fired and struck his daughter once, Owen said.

Although the investigation is ongoing, Owen said, the shooting appears to have been a tragic accident. “For it to be a father and daughter is just a horrible situation,” he said.

Dispatchers began receiving 911 calls at about 5:15 p.m. Saturday about a "hunting accident involving an 11-year-old female," the sheriff’s office said in a statement. "Further calls determined that a father had accidentally shot his 11-year-old daughter."

Air transportation was requested, the sheriff’s office said, but all emergency helicopters were grounded because of inclement weather. The critically wounded girl was transported with a police escort to Christus Good Shepherd Medical Center in Longview, where she was pronounced dead, officials said.




How do you shoot someone when you're unloading a gun? How would a rifle discharge when you don't have your finger on the trigger?

Should a safety test be required before you can buy a gun?


RIP


Actually, it can. The Remington 700 had a series of failures, where the rifle would fire without any pressure on the trigger when it was taken off safe.

ttps://www.cnbc.com/2020/04/06/remington-trigger-problems-surface-as-class-action-settlement-deadline-nears.html

The design was good, but the way it was executed to give a light, target style trigger, which led to greater accuracy, could also fail and fire as the safety was slid off. It became so prevalent for a while it was known as a “Remington moment” to shooters.

And that is but one example. One that caused numerous deaths.

Now, the anti gun folks will swear that this is why we need to get rid of the law protecting gun manufacturers, sellers, etc. from frivolous lawsuits. However, Remington was sued, several times by individuals, and eventually as a class action law suit. Design flaws, or flaws in manufacturing are not covered by the law protecting the manufacturers.

As cars have recalls, there have been recalls for weapons. Including the Remington 700 and the Taurus Millennium Pro Pistols. Those would fire if the safety was on in some circumstances.

IN a way, it is like a car, if the gear shift is in park, and there is a failure, the car can roll. So safety people say to always put your parking break on. In case the transmission fails to hold the car in park.
 
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Otis Mayfield

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Hunter safety won't prevent accidents from happening. I've been a hunter, shooter, reloader, collector, trader and even repair them on a personal basis. I've owned hundreds of guns throughout my lifetime, starting back in the early 60's. Shot hundreds of thousands of rounds, mostly at targets or training.

And in spite of that, even I've had 5 accidental discharges during my lifetime. I still don't know where the 9mm slug went after that last one I had in the garage, a few months ago. It's buried somewhere in those shelves full of shit I have out there.

But I have started using a 5-gallon bucket full of sand to clear a weapon in. :laughing0301:

View attachment 570076

They do that in army. The MPs discharge their pistols into a 5 gallon bucket of sand at the end of the shift.

Awfully embarrassing when a round goes off. But hey, maybe it saved a life.
 

HereWeGoAgain

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Why can't we require hunter safety training?

Or gun training for that matter?

"Don't point the end with hole at anyone, ever."

"If you think your gun is unloaded, treat it like it isn't."

"If you see the bushes shaking, make sure it's a deer before you shoot."

"Don't leave a loaded gun around unsupervised kids." (toddlers kill like 30 people a year.)

Most states do require Hunter safety courses below a certain age. Couldn't tell you the age but if you're a certain age you're grandfathered in.
I guess they figure if you havent shot anyone by now you're good to go.
 

HereWeGoAgain

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Actually, it can. The Remington 700 had a series of failures, where the rifle would fire without any pressure on the trigger when it was taken off safe.

ttps://www.cnbc.com/2020/04/06/remington-trigger-problems-surface-as-class-action-settlement-deadline-nears.html

The design was good, but the way it was executed to give a light, target style trigger, which led to greater accuracy, could also fail and fire as the safety was slid off. It became so prevalent for a while it was known as a “Remington moment” to shooters.

And that is but one example. One that caused numerous deaths.

Now, the anti gun folks will swear that this is why we need to get rid of the law protecting gun manufacturers, sellers, etc. from frivolous lawsuits. However, Remington was sued, several times by individuals, and eventually as a class action law suit. Design flaws, or flaws in manufacturing are not covered by the law protecting the manufacturers.

As cars have recalls, there have been recalls for weapons. Including the Remington 700 and the Taurus Millennium Pro Pistols. Those would fire if the safety was on in some circumstances.

IN a way, it is like a car, if the gear shift is in park, and there is a failure, the car can roll. So safety people say to always put your parking break on. In case the transmission fails to hold the car in park.

Yep.
And I'm living proof. My Father in law gave me a Remington 700 in .270.
Took it out the first time to sight it in and when I pulled the trigger it was like the safety was on. Of course I kept the barrel pointed down range at the hip and pulled the trigger several more times and nothing.
As I was about to eject the shell it went off.
Took it to a gunsmith and he said they're known for this. He fixed it and it's been a fine rifle ever since.
 

Crepitus

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Strangely, you may be right to a point. Though I don't know about 'most'. The difference is 'responsible' gun owners, know exactly what they are and how dangerous they can be. There are far too many irresponsible gun owners that have no real understanding. Either way, that argument has little to do with this particular story that is a very tragic accident.
It has a lot to do with it. Only someone who isn't conscious of the damage the rifle can do would have pointed it at anyone even accidentally with his finger on the trigger while supposedly unloading it.
 

Crepitus

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What a stupid thing to say.
Hunters see first hand what a rifle can do to flesh you moron.
And are still mostly clueless, which says a lot about their average intelligence.
 

airplanemechanic

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In 2018, accidental gun deaths accounted for 1% (458) of total gun-related deaths (39,740) in the United States.


458 isn't trivial.

Are you out there trying to ban cigs? You know, those little tobacco sticks that kill 600,000 Americans every year?

458 is peanuts compared to SIX HUNDRED THOUSAND.
 
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Otis Mayfield

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Are you out there trying to ban cigs? You know, those little tobacco sticks that kill 600,000 Americans every year?

458 is peanuts compared to SIX HUNDRED THOUSAND.

Cigarette smoking is responsible for more than 480,000 deaths per year in the United States, including more than 41,000 deaths resulting from secondhand smoke exposure. This is about one in five deaths annually, or 1,300 deaths every day. On average, smokers die 10 years earlier than nonsmokers.



sounded a little high.

There are a lot of things that cause more deaths than accidental gun discharges.

But a little training could stop a lot of accidental gun discharges.

It's low hanging fruit.
 

Blues Man

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In 2018, accidental gun deaths accounted for 1% (458) of total gun-related deaths (39,740) in the United States.


458 isn't trivial.
What percentage of actual gun use resulted in accidental death?

People use guns for sport, hunting, target practice millions of times if not tens of millions of times annually.

in 2019 15,544,849 hunting licenses were issued in the USA

We can assume all of those people went hunting at least once that year.

How many people shot skeet, or participated in target shooting for fun or competition in the same year? I think 8 million is a low ball estimate.

So we can say with a high degree of confidence that in 2019 there were at least 15,544,849 plus 8 million instances of people using a gun in the United states.

so 458/23511849 =.0000195 or .00195% of gun uses in 2019 resulted in accidental death.

And in all probability my estimate of all uses of firearms annually is really low.

So yes if any other activity had a risk of death that was .00195% or less it would be praised to the heavens as being one of the safest activities known to man
 
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JustAnotherNut

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It has a lot to do with it. Only someone who isn't conscious of the damage the rifle can do would have pointed it at anyone even accidentally with his finger on the trigger while supposedly unloading it.


The article doesn't give the details of exactly how the father was trying to unload the gun. You are assuming he actively shot it to release the round that killed the girl. He could very well have been trying to take the gun apart to get the round out and with his focus of attention on doing that, it went off.

Nobody knows until the investigation is completed, but as yet it's still considered a tragic accident
 

Wild Bill Kelsoe

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Why can't we require hunter safety training?

Or gun training for that matter?

"Don't point the end with hole at anyone, ever."

"If you think your gun is unloaded, treat it like it isn't."

"If you see the bushes shaking, make sure it's a deer before you shoot."

"Don't leave a loaded gun around unsupervised kids." (toddlers kill like 30 people a year.)
Im all for it and the government should foot the bill.
 

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