Oregon Now Completely In Drought

ScienceRocks

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Oregon Now Completely In Drought
January 16, 2014


The USDA released their weekly Drought Monitor today, declaring a drought disaster across portions of 11 western states. Oregon hasn’t been included in that category…for now.
It shows drought conditions creeping farther north than a few weeks ago. Pathetic snowpack and the driest water year since 1976-77 for some parts of the Pacific Northwest mean unless we get significant rain in the next two months we’ll have serious drought issues. Now of course I’ve played this game before and remember several years where it was looking bad and suddenly it turned around. Many times it’s in late February or March. But the Drought Monitor shows conditions NOW, not what could change in the next few months.

For the next 7-10 days, no sign of change. The upper-level ridging along the West Coast stays put. Tonight’s 00z GFS showed no precipitation until the 31st (only two weeks away!).
FOX 12 Weather Blog - KPTV - FOX 12
 

mamooth

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Mt. Shasta, at the northern edge of California, is almost snow-free right now. In mid-winter. It's freaking everyone there out, as the mountain is usually mostly snow-covered.
 

SSDD

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In the "Nothing New" department:

Oregon History Project
clip: "Drought arrived in northeastern Oregon in 1928 and remained until 1940."

Droughts | Oregon Partnership for Disaster Resilience
clip: Droughts are not uncommon in the State of Oregon, nor are they just an “east of the mountains” phenomenon. They occur in all parts of the state, in both summer and winter."

Flap your arms, wave your hands and hyperventilate till you pass out but the drought in Oregon is nothing new or unprecedented.
 
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ScienceRocks

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In the "Nothing New" department:

Oregon History Project
clip: "Drought arrived in northeastern Oregon in 1928 and remained until 1940."

Droughts | Oregon Partnership for Disaster Resilience
clip: Droughts are not uncommon in the State of Oregon, nor are they just an “east of the mountains” phenomenon. They occur in all parts of the state, in both summer and winter."

Flap your arms, wave your hands and hyperventilate till you pass out but the drought in Oregon is nothing new or unprecedented.
Yeah Mark Nelson is know nothing. Fuck off moron.

Eugene and many area's throughout the state just had 1st or second driest year ever in 2013.


Among other highlights of Oregon’s 2013 weather year:
##As of mid-December, the Eugene Airport had recorded 21.04 inches of precipitation; the record low was set in 1944 with 23.26 inches. Records there date back to 1911.
##The Salem Airport had logged 23.41 inches through mid-December. The driest on record, dating back to 1940, is 23.77 inches.
##The North Bend Airport is well ahead of the record dry year, set in 1976 with 33.52 inches. Through mid-December, the station had only recorded 28.67 inches. Records date to 1928.

Dello frequently provides weather facts and historical data via Twitter at: www.twitter.com/orclimatesvc.


http://oregonstate.edu/ua/ncs/archi...dup-wettest-september-doesn’t-offset-dry-year
 
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SSDD

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Eugene and many area's throughout the state just had 1st or second driest year ever in 2013.
Only if you discount large blocks of recorded history. Guess that's easy when you have your head up your ass.
 

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Let's see what the AGWCult Model says:

<Oregon Now Completely In Drought> because of Manmade Global Warming
 

SSDD

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Let's see what the AGWCult Model says:

<Oregon Now Completely In Drought> because of Manmade Global Warming
Uncanny how accurate that thing is. I bet it would be great at picking sports scores and stock prices after the fact as well.
 

Old Rocks

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A state with huge evergreen forests is now in a historical level drought. TeeHee, giggle, giggle. Typical rightwingnutter response.

We still have February and March. Should the drought continue, however, by May, we may see the start of a terrible fire summer. Looks at present as if we will have an El Nino this summer, and that is not at all good when the forests are already dry.
 

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Let's see what the AGWCult Model says:

<Oregon Now Completely In Drought> because of Manmade Global Warming
Uncanny how accurate that thing is. I bet it would be great at picking sports scores and stock prices after the fact as well.
This global warming is sweeping the ocean like the mud shark.

<flood, droughts> because of manmade global warming
 

editec

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Droughts are seldom one year events.,


More typically they are protracted events that last (more or less) for decades.


They are ONLY droughts to man, of course. The great American WEST for example, is more commonly in what we call a drought than not.

Which begs the question...if a lack of water is more common than not, can we really call it a drought?


As to Oregon?

Sorry to read that you guys are in a drought.

Cannot imagine what that'd going to like if it persists for a great long time.

There's LOTS of stuff to burn there.
 

SSDD

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A state with huge evergreen forests is now in a historical level drought. TeeHee, giggle, giggle. Typical rightwingnutter response.

We still have February and March. Should the drought continue, however, by May, we may see the start of a terrible fire summer. Looks at present as if we will have an El Nino this summer, and that is not at all good when the forests are already dry.
Nothing funny about drought asswipe, the humor lies in you idiots trying to make out as if it were something new and or unprecedented...it isn't.
 

skookerasbil

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I always laugh my balls off when I post this ^ up when some dummy starts a drought thread as if it has something to do with climate change.
 
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Star

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I always laugh my balls off when I post this ^ up when some dummy starts a drought thread as if it has something to do with climate change.

Your map(s) is simplistic. There are multiple factors to take into consideration...

For example: Global Warming Means More Evaporation

The SPEI can also be used to show how climate change is affecting the frequency of droughts in the Southwest.
According to an analysis by Climate Central, average annual temperatures have been increasing faster in the Southwest than in any other part of the country. Since 1970, temperatures in Arizona have been climbing at a rate of 0.639 °F per decade. As a result, rates of evapotranspiration have been increasing as well.

This graph shows the SPEI in Arizona over the same timeframe, but this time it takes out the precipitation component (SPI), and just shows evapotranspiration. The red bars show how quickly moisture disappeared from the atmosphere in each year:

Credit: CLIMAS, via Zack Guido​

Notice how much evaporation has increased over the past 30 years (shown in red, facing down). This does not mean that there has been a period of 30-year drought in the Southwest, or that the drought from the past 10 years has been worse than the droughts from the 1950s. Instead, it shows that as the climate got warmer, the rain that fell disappeared more rapidly. In other words, in a warming world, it takes more rain to stave off a drought.

.
 

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