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OPINION: The Chauvin verdict links back to George Floyd protests. So lawmakers are cracking down.

MeBelle

MeBelle 4 Prez 2024
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You jokers sound like trump more and more every day.
When you don't like the outcome:
It was rigged!!!
They cheated!!!!
SSDD

wth is wrong with asking questions?

Further, why can't you respond to questions without insulting people?

Seems you only question the ones where a white cop is held accountable.

Seems like you are wrong, sorry about that.

Am I? From your posts I don't think so.
 

Tommy Tainant

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Its not just American right wingers doing this. In the UK you can now get 10 years for damaging the statue of a slaver. 5 years for rape. Conservative values.

Link?

So this is a new bill for your country?
Yes, a few statues got damaged last year and they latched on to it as a culture war thing. I cant see any judge in his right mind handing out 10 years but you never know.
 
OP
NewsVine_Mariyam

NewsVine_Mariyam

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If people have Constitutional or other legally protected rights but due to fear of repercussions that may follow, opt to not exercise them, then what's the point of having them? Passing laws that allow others to intimidate or encroach upon any of our rights is sending us back in time to when black people had no legal rights or protections against harm caused by racists.

At least this is what the proposition of these laws makes me think, first they attacked and further restrict voting rights, now they're attaching the 1st Amendment protections for peaceable assembly and petitioning our government for a redress of grievances?

Instead of looking to stamp out police brutality, (mostly Republican) politicians are turning against the movement leading our overdue national reckoning.
Image: BLM protest

A police officer holds down a protester while another, rear, sprays pepper spray during a Black Lives Matter protest in Boston on May 29.Joseph Prezioso / AFP via Getty Images file

April 21, 2021, 1:31 AM PDT
By Dorian Warren, co-president of Community Change and Seft Hunter, director of Black-led organizing at Community Change
On Tuesday, a jury in Minnesota found former police officer Derek Chauvin guilty on all three charges in the death of George Floyd: second- and third-degree murder and second-degree manslaughter. As the verdict was read, communities across the country came together — as they have for the past year — to demonstrate against police violence and for racial justice.

The fact that Chauvin will probably be going to jail may provide some solace to Floyd’s family. But true justice remains elusive.

The fact that Chauvin will probably be going to jail may provide some solace to Floyd's family. But true justice remains elusive. Consider the dozens
of states that are gearing up to pass sweeping crackdowns on our First Amendment right to protest peacefully.

Protests are vital in America. Protests put pressure on Minnesota authorities to charge Chauvin, on city and state officials to evaluate their police budgets (to mixed success) and on Congress to draft bills like the George Floyd Justice in Policing Act, which passed the House but will need bipartisan support to pass the Senate.

This is the kind of power these lawmakers are trying to curb.

Our right to assemble and petition the government for redress of grievances is embedded in our Constitution, and it forms the bedrock of who we are — and aspire to be — as a democracy. But once again, some politicians are doing what they do best: trying to take away the rights (especially) of Black and brown people to show our discontent and blame us for speaking out against the brutality we face every day.

In Minnesota, the center of last year's demonstrations, the Legislature is considering a bill that would make anyone convicted of a crime at a protest ineligible for state loans, grants or assistance, including student loans, food stamps, rental assistance and unemployment benefits.
Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis signed a sweeping law just this week that imposes new penalties for people arrested at demonstrations and offers more immunity for people who hit protesters with vehicles....


So you support allowing people engaging in protest to committee criminal acts?
I never said or implied any such thing however why are you lumping protestors in with rioters, vandals, looter & arsonist? They're not the same people.
 

freyasman

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If people have Constitutional or other legally protected rights but due to fear of repercussions that may follow, opt to not exercise them, then what's the point of having them? Passing laws that allow others to intimidate or encroach upon any of our rights is sending us back in time to when black people had no legal rights or protections against harm caused by racists.

At least this is what the proposition of these laws makes me think, first they attacked and further restrict voting rights, now they're attaching the 1st Amendment protections for peaceable assembly and petitioning our government for a redress of grievances?

Instead of looking to stamp out police brutality, (mostly Republican) politicians are turning against the movement leading our overdue national reckoning.
Image: BLM protest

A police officer holds down a protester while another, rear, sprays pepper spray during a Black Lives Matter protest in Boston on May 29.Joseph Prezioso / AFP via Getty Images file

April 21, 2021, 1:31 AM PDT
By Dorian Warren, co-president of Community Change and Seft Hunter, director of Black-led organizing at Community Change
On Tuesday, a jury in Minnesota found former police officer Derek Chauvin guilty on all three charges in the death of George Floyd: second- and third-degree murder and second-degree manslaughter. As the verdict was read, communities across the country came together — as they have for the past year — to demonstrate against police violence and for racial justice.

The fact that Chauvin will probably be going to jail may provide some solace to Floyd’s family. But true justice remains elusive.

The fact that Chauvin will probably be going to jail may provide some solace to Floyd's family. But true justice remains elusive. Consider the dozens
of states that are gearing up to pass sweeping crackdowns on our First Amendment right to protest peacefully.

Protests are vital in America. Protests put pressure on Minnesota authorities to charge Chauvin, on city and state officials to evaluate their police budgets (to mixed success) and on Congress to draft bills like the George Floyd Justice in Policing Act, which passed the House but will need bipartisan support to pass the Senate.

This is the kind of power these lawmakers are trying to curb.

Our right to assemble and petition the government for redress of grievances is embedded in our Constitution, and it forms the bedrock of who we are — and aspire to be — as a democracy. But once again, some politicians are doing what they do best: trying to take away the rights (especially) of Black and brown people to show our discontent and blame us for speaking out against the brutality we face every day.

In Minnesota, the center of last year's demonstrations, the Legislature is considering a bill that would make anyone convicted of a crime at a protest ineligible for state loans, grants or assistance, including student loans, food stamps, rental assistance and unemployment benefits.
Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis signed a sweeping law just this week that imposes new penalties for people arrested at demonstrations and offers more immunity for people who hit protesters with vehicles....


So you support allowing people engaging in protest to committee criminal acts?
I never said or implied any such thing however why are you lumping protestors in with rioters, vandals, looter & arsonist? They're not the same people.
No, they're not but they do have a symbiotic relationship.
Rioters, vandals, looters, and arsonists are using the cover of the crowd, the crowd that wouldn't be there but for the protests, to conduct their illegal acts from a position of relative safety.

And activists are using the threat of a potential riot, to coerce and intimidate anyone they choose to "protest".

"Real nice city you got there.... be a shame if it caught on fire."
:rolleyes:


As long as they continue to stand shoulder to shoulder, you can expect them to get tarred with the same brush.

(You know, the same way any white person who says that conservative voices have a right to be heard is immediately labeled a racist white supremacist.)
 

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