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OPINION: The Chauvin verdict links back to George Floyd protests. So lawmakers are cracking down.

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NewsVine_Mariyam

NewsVine_Mariyam

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You must be fairly young if you believe this to be drama.

People were threatened, had their livlihoods destroyed and even killed for registering black people down south to vote or voting.

Surely you've heard of these young men right?
The murders of Chaney, Goodman, and Schwerner, also known as the Freedom Summer murders, the Mississippi civil rights workers' murders or the Mississippi Burning murders, refers to three activists who were abducted and murdered in Neshoba County, Mississippi, in June 1964 during the Civil Rights Movement. The victims were James Chaney from Meridian, Mississippi, and Andrew Goodman and Michael Schwerner from New York City. All three were associated with the Council of Federated Organizations (COFO) and its member organization, the Congress of Racial Equality (CORE). They had been working with the Freedom Summer campaign by attempting to register African Americans in Mississippi to vote. Since 1890 and through the turn of the century, southern states had systematically disenfranchised most black voters by discrimination in voter registration and voting.​
The three men had traveled from Meridian to the community of Longdale to talk with congregation members at a black church that had been burned; the church had been a center of community organization. The trio was arrested following a traffic stop for speeding outside Philadelphia, Mississippi, escorted to the local jail, and held for a number of hours.[1] As the three left town in their car, they were followed by law enforcement and others. Before leaving Neshoba County, their car was pulled over. The three were abducted, driven to another location, and shot to death at close range. The three men's bodies were taken to an earthen dam where they were buried.[1]


What has this to do with your OP?

The OP is about Chauvin/Floyd - current day not yesteryear.

Are you trying to make a different point?
My mistake, I'm still learning how to properly quote and link my text to the webpage of the article. This one ends with the following

And as often happens in this country, glimmers of progress have been met with violent and determined opposition by those who benefit from the white supremacist systems embedded in its governance.
Since the 2020 election, state after state has considered laws that would suppress voting rights — 361 and counting — especially in Black and brown communities. Now, we are seeing the blatant attack on our right to assemble and freedom of speech. According to USA Today, 35 states are considering more than 90 bills aimed at keeping people from protesting. One only has to look at the difference between the George Floyd protests and the Jan. 6 insurrection at the U.S. Capitol to see how protesters of different backgrounds are treated.​
 

pknopp

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Even if it was the right outcome, which I'm not sure of and don't much care, if the trial itself wasn't as fair as we can make it, then what's the point?
ok. What was unfair about the trial?
Witness, jury, and pretty much the whole city was being intimidated.

The jury clearly made the right decision in finding him guilty. Some now want to argue it was only because of intimidation. It was simply clearly the right decision. The video combined with his fellow officers condemning him is what found him guilty. Or in other words, the evidence.

We have a country that has too many people in it that can't stand losing. Immature. The whole Russia thing on one side, electing someone with a 9 year year old temperament on the other.

Waters didn't have any business getting involved. Others had no business pushing the idea that the election was "stolen", both this time and the last. Too many people belong to the cults.
 
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NewsVine_Mariyam

NewsVine_Mariyam

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You must be fairly young if you believe this to be drama.

People were threatened, had their livlihoods destroyed and even killed for registering black people down south to vote or voting.

Surely you've heard of these young men right?
The murders of Chaney, Goodman, and Schwerner, also known as the Freedom Summer murders, the Mississippi civil rights workers' murders or the Mississippi Burning murders, refers to three activists who were abducted and murdered in Neshoba County, Mississippi, in June 1964 during the Civil Rights Movement. The victims were James Chaney from Meridian, Mississippi, and Andrew Goodman and Michael Schwerner from New York City. All three were associated with the Council of Federated Organizations (COFO) and its member organization, the Congress of Racial Equality (CORE). They had been working with the Freedom Summer campaign by attempting to register African Americans in Mississippi to vote. Since 1890 and through the turn of the century, southern states had systematically disenfranchised most black voters by discrimination in voter registration and voting.​
The three men had traveled from Meridian to the community of Longdale to talk with congregation members at a black church that had been burned; the church had been a center of community organization. The trio was arrested following a traffic stop for speeding outside Philadelphia, Mississippi, escorted to the local jail, and held for a number of hours.[1] As the three left town in their car, they were followed by law enforcement and others. Before leaving Neshoba County, their car was pulled over. The three were abducted, driven to another location, and shot to death at close range. The three men's bodies were taken to an earthen dam where they were buried.[1]
And now that the roles are being reversed, all that wrong shit is all right now?

Is that how it is?





They wanted freedom.

Your sorry ass just wants to be the one holding the whip.
What roles are being reversed? The point of the article is that there are factions in society who when they don't get their way but most particularly when they feel that they are beginning to lose power, begin to retaliate in a myriad of ways, but attempting to eviscerate Constitutional protections is particularly heinous in my opinion.

You may not care about the right to peaceably assemble but what if it were a 2nd Amendment right they were creating laws to punish you for? You would be okay with that? Yes you have the Constitutional right to keep and bear arms but if you dare to exercise that right you can kiss goodbye any further assistance from the government, including unemployment insurance if your boss decides he doesn't want you working there because he knows you spend time on the weekend at the shooting range, or that you're a gun owner, or that you carry. That's not even lawful HOWEVER if they pass a law allowing it, even if it is eventually found to be unconstitutional, while it's the law of the land a lot of people will be harmed and they know this.

In any case, your comment and the personal nature of it was entirely uncalled for.
 

freyasman

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Even if it was the right outcome, which I'm not sure of and don't much care, if the trial itself wasn't as fair as we can make it, then what's the point?
ok. What was unfair about the trial?
Witness, jury, and pretty much the whole city was being intimidated.

The jury clearly made the right decision in finding him guilty. Some now want to argue it was only because of intimidation. It was simply clearly the right decision. The video combined with his fellow officers condemning him is what found him guilty. Or in other words, the evidence.

We have a country that has too many people in it that can't stand losing. Immature. The whole Russia thing on one side, electing someone with a 9 year year old temperament on the other.

Waters didn't have any business getting involved. Others had no business pushing the idea that the election was "stolen", both this time and the last. Too many people belong to the cults.
Maybe, maybe not.... again, I don't much care.

I do care about courts caving in to the mob, though.

That doesn't lead anywhere good.
 

freyasman

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You must be fairly young if you believe this to be drama.

People were threatened, had their livlihoods destroyed and even killed for registering black people down south to vote or voting.

Surely you've heard of these young men right?
The murders of Chaney, Goodman, and Schwerner, also known as the Freedom Summer murders, the Mississippi civil rights workers' murders or the Mississippi Burning murders, refers to three activists who were abducted and murdered in Neshoba County, Mississippi, in June 1964 during the Civil Rights Movement. The victims were James Chaney from Meridian, Mississippi, and Andrew Goodman and Michael Schwerner from New York City. All three were associated with the Council of Federated Organizations (COFO) and its member organization, the Congress of Racial Equality (CORE). They had been working with the Freedom Summer campaign by attempting to register African Americans in Mississippi to vote. Since 1890 and through the turn of the century, southern states had systematically disenfranchised most black voters by discrimination in voter registration and voting.​
The three men had traveled from Meridian to the community of Longdale to talk with congregation members at a black church that had been burned; the church had been a center of community organization. The trio was arrested following a traffic stop for speeding outside Philadelphia, Mississippi, escorted to the local jail, and held for a number of hours.[1] As the three left town in their car, they were followed by law enforcement and others. Before leaving Neshoba County, their car was pulled over. The three were abducted, driven to another location, and shot to death at close range. The three men's bodies were taken to an earthen dam where they were buried.[1]
And now that the roles are being reversed, all that wrong shit is all right now?

Is that how it is?





They wanted freedom.

Your sorry ass just wants to be the one holding the whip.
What roles are being reversed? The point of the article is that there are factions in society who when they don't get their way but most particularly when they feel that they are beginning to lose power, begin to retaliate in a myriad of ways, but attempting to eviscerate Constitutional protections is particularly heinous in my opinion.

You may not care about the right to peaceably assemble but what if it were a 2nd Amendment right they were creating laws to punish you for? You would be okay with that? Yes you have the Constitutional right to keep and bear arms but if you dare to exercise that right you can kiss goodbye any further assistance from the government, including unemployment insurance if your boss decides he doesn't want you working there because he knows you spend time on the weekend at the shooting range, or that you're a gun owner, or that you carry. That's not even lawful HOWEVER if they pass a law allowing it, even if it is eventually found to be unconstitutional, while it's the law of the land a lot of people will be harmed and they know this.

In any case, your comment and the personal nature of it was entirely uncalled for.
No it wasn't, and you know it.
That's why it pissed you off.
 

pknopp

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Even if it was the right outcome, which I'm not sure of and don't much care, if the trial itself wasn't as fair as we can make it, then what's the point?
ok. What was unfair about the trial?
Witness, jury, and pretty much the whole city was being intimidated.

The jury clearly made the right decision in finding him guilty. Some now want to argue it was only because of intimidation. It was simply clearly the right decision. The video combined with his fellow officers condemning him is what found him guilty. Or in other words, the evidence.

We have a country that has too many people in it that can't stand losing. Immature. The whole Russia thing on one side, electing someone with a 9 year year old temperament on the other.

Waters didn't have any business getting involved. Others had no business pushing the idea that the election was "stolen", both this time and the last. Too many people belong to the cults.
Maybe, maybe not.... again, I don't much care.

I do care about courts caving in to the mob, though.

That doesn't lead anywhere good.

When that happens we can bring it up and discuss it.
 
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NewsVine_Mariyam

NewsVine_Mariyam

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freyasman

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Even if it was the right outcome, which I'm not sure of and don't much care, if the trial itself wasn't as fair as we can make it, then what's the point?
ok. What was unfair about the trial?
Witness, jury, and pretty much the whole city was being intimidated.

The jury clearly made the right decision in finding him guilty. Some now want to argue it was only because of intimidation. It was simply clearly the right decision. The video combined with his fellow officers condemning him is what found him guilty. Or in other words, the evidence.

We have a country that has too many people in it that can't stand losing. Immature. The whole Russia thing on one side, electing someone with a 9 year year old temperament on the other.

Waters didn't have any business getting involved. Others had no business pushing the idea that the election was "stolen", both this time and the last. Too many people belong to the cults.
Maybe, maybe not.... again, I don't much care.

I do care about courts caving in to the mob, though.

That doesn't lead anywhere good.

When that happens we can bring it up and discuss it.
Can we?

Doesn't seem like.
 

freyasman

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Even if it was the right outcome, which I'm not sure of and don't much care, if the trial itself wasn't as fair as we can make it, then what's the point?
ok. What was unfair about the trial?
Witness, jury, and pretty much the whole city was being intimidated.
And if that was occurring it's completely unlawful but apparently no one did anything about it?
Been a lot of that going around for a long time now.
 
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NewsVine_Mariyam

NewsVine_Mariyam

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You must be fairly young if you believe this to be drama.

People were threatened, had their livlihoods destroyed and even killed for registering black people down south to vote or voting.

Surely you've heard of these young men right?
The murders of Chaney, Goodman, and Schwerner, also known as the Freedom Summer murders, the Mississippi civil rights workers' murders or the Mississippi Burning murders, refers to three activists who were abducted and murdered in Neshoba County, Mississippi, in June 1964 during the Civil Rights Movement. The victims were James Chaney from Meridian, Mississippi, and Andrew Goodman and Michael Schwerner from New York City. All three were associated with the Council of Federated Organizations (COFO) and its member organization, the Congress of Racial Equality (CORE). They had been working with the Freedom Summer campaign by attempting to register African Americans in Mississippi to vote. Since 1890 and through the turn of the century, southern states had systematically disenfranchised most black voters by discrimination in voter registration and voting.​
The three men had traveled from Meridian to the community of Longdale to talk with congregation members at a black church that had been burned; the church had been a center of community organization. The trio was arrested following a traffic stop for speeding outside Philadelphia, Mississippi, escorted to the local jail, and held for a number of hours.[1] As the three left town in their car, they were followed by law enforcement and others. Before leaving Neshoba County, their car was pulled over. The three were abducted, driven to another location, and shot to death at close range. The three men's bodies were taken to an earthen dam where they were buried.[1]
And now that the roles are being reversed, all that wrong shit is all right now?

Is that how it is?





They wanted freedom.

Your sorry ass just wants to be the one holding the whip.
What roles are being reversed? The point of the article is that there are factions in society who when they don't get their way but most particularly when they feel that they are beginning to lose power, begin to retaliate in a myriad of ways, but attempting to eviscerate Constitutional protections is particularly heinous in my opinion.

You may not care about the right to peaceably assemble but what if it were a 2nd Amendment right they were creating laws to punish you for? You would be okay with that? Yes you have the Constitutional right to keep and bear arms but if you dare to exercise that right you can kiss goodbye any further assistance from the government, including unemployment insurance if your boss decides he doesn't want you working there because he knows you spend time on the weekend at the shooting range, or that you're a gun owner, or that you carry. That's not even lawful HOWEVER if they pass a law allowing it, even if it is eventually found to be unconstitutional, while it's the law of the land a lot of people will be harmed and they know this.

In any case, your comment and the personal nature of it was entirely uncalled for.
No it wasn't, and you know it.
That's why it pissed you off.
Of course it was uncalled for and you missed the mark if you thought it would piss me off. Just because I didn't give it a pass doesn't mean I took for anything more than it is.

So you don't care if they start violating your 2nd Amendment rights?
 

pknopp

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Even if it was the right outcome, which I'm not sure of and don't much care, if the trial itself wasn't as fair as we can make it, then what's the point?
ok. What was unfair about the trial?
Witness, jury, and pretty much the whole city was being intimidated.

The jury clearly made the right decision in finding him guilty. Some now want to argue it was only because of intimidation. It was simply clearly the right decision. The video combined with his fellow officers condemning him is what found him guilty. Or in other words, the evidence.

We have a country that has too many people in it that can't stand losing. Immature. The whole Russia thing on one side, electing someone with a 9 year year old temperament on the other.

Waters didn't have any business getting involved. Others had no business pushing the idea that the election was "stolen", both this time and the last. Too many people belong to the cults.
Maybe, maybe not.... again, I don't much care.

I do care about courts caving in to the mob, though.

That doesn't lead anywhere good.

When that happens we can bring it up and discuss it.
Can we?

Doesn't seem like.

We won't know until it happens.
 

freyasman

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You must be fairly young if you believe this to be drama.

People were threatened, had their livlihoods destroyed and even killed for registering black people down south to vote or voting.

Surely you've heard of these young men right?
The murders of Chaney, Goodman, and Schwerner, also known as the Freedom Summer murders, the Mississippi civil rights workers' murders or the Mississippi Burning murders, refers to three activists who were abducted and murdered in Neshoba County, Mississippi, in June 1964 during the Civil Rights Movement. The victims were James Chaney from Meridian, Mississippi, and Andrew Goodman and Michael Schwerner from New York City. All three were associated with the Council of Federated Organizations (COFO) and its member organization, the Congress of Racial Equality (CORE). They had been working with the Freedom Summer campaign by attempting to register African Americans in Mississippi to vote. Since 1890 and through the turn of the century, southern states had systematically disenfranchised most black voters by discrimination in voter registration and voting.​
The three men had traveled from Meridian to the community of Longdale to talk with congregation members at a black church that had been burned; the church had been a center of community organization. The trio was arrested following a traffic stop for speeding outside Philadelphia, Mississippi, escorted to the local jail, and held for a number of hours.[1] As the three left town in their car, they were followed by law enforcement and others. Before leaving Neshoba County, their car was pulled over. The three were abducted, driven to another location, and shot to death at close range. The three men's bodies were taken to an earthen dam where they were buried.[1]
And now that the roles are being reversed, all that wrong shit is all right now?

Is that how it is?





They wanted freedom.

Your sorry ass just wants to be the one holding the whip.
What roles are being reversed? The point of the article is that there are factions in society who when they don't get their way but most particularly when they feel that they are beginning to lose power, begin to retaliate in a myriad of ways, but attempting to eviscerate Constitutional protections is particularly heinous in my opinion.

You may not care about the right to peaceably assemble but what if it were a 2nd Amendment right they were creating laws to punish you for? You would be okay with that? Yes you have the Constitutional right to keep and bear arms but if you dare to exercise that right you can kiss goodbye any further assistance from the government, including unemployment insurance if your boss decides he doesn't want you working there because he knows you spend time on the weekend at the shooting range, or that you're a gun owner, or that you carry. That's not even lawful HOWEVER if they pass a law allowing it, even if it is eventually found to be unconstitutional, while it's the law of the land a lot of people will be harmed and they know this.

In any case, your comment and the personal nature of it was entirely uncalled for.
No it wasn't, and you know it.
That's why it pissed you off.
Of course it was uncalled for and you missed the mark if you thought it would piss me off. Just because I didn't give it a pass doesn't mean I took for anything more than it is.

So you don't care if they start violating your 2nd Amendment rights?
Do you not care if BLM acts just like the Klan did 50 years ago?
 
OP
NewsVine_Mariyam

NewsVine_Mariyam

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You must be fairly young if you believe this to be drama.

People were threatened, had their livlihoods destroyed and even killed for registering black people down south to vote or voting.

Surely you've heard of these young men right?
The murders of Chaney, Goodman, and Schwerner, also known as the Freedom Summer murders, the Mississippi civil rights workers' murders or the Mississippi Burning murders, refers to three activists who were abducted and murdered in Neshoba County, Mississippi, in June 1964 during the Civil Rights Movement. The victims were James Chaney from Meridian, Mississippi, and Andrew Goodman and Michael Schwerner from New York City. All three were associated with the Council of Federated Organizations (COFO) and its member organization, the Congress of Racial Equality (CORE). They had been working with the Freedom Summer campaign by attempting to register African Americans in Mississippi to vote. Since 1890 and through the turn of the century, southern states had systematically disenfranchised most black voters by discrimination in voter registration and voting.​
The three men had traveled from Meridian to the community of Longdale to talk with congregation members at a black church that had been burned; the church had been a center of community organization. The trio was arrested following a traffic stop for speeding outside Philadelphia, Mississippi, escorted to the local jail, and held for a number of hours.[1] As the three left town in their car, they were followed by law enforcement and others. Before leaving Neshoba County, their car was pulled over. The three were abducted, driven to another location, and shot to death at close range. The three men's bodies were taken to an earthen dam where they were buried.[1]
And now that the roles are being reversed, all that wrong shit is all right now?

Is that how it is?





They wanted freedom.

Your sorry ass just wants to be the one holding the whip.
What roles are being reversed? The point of the article is that there are factions in society who when they don't get their way but most particularly when they feel that they are beginning to lose power, begin to retaliate in a myriad of ways, but attempting to eviscerate Constitutional protections is particularly heinous in my opinion.

You may not care about the right to peaceably assemble but what if it were a 2nd Amendment right they were creating laws to punish you for? You would be okay with that? Yes you have the Constitutional right to keep and bear arms but if you dare to exercise that right you can kiss goodbye any further assistance from the government, including unemployment insurance if your boss decides he doesn't want you working there because he knows you spend time on the weekend at the shooting range, or that you're a gun owner, or that you carry. That's not even lawful HOWEVER if they pass a law allowing it, even if it is eventually found to be unconstitutional, while it's the law of the land a lot of people will be harmed and they know this.

In any case, your comment and the personal nature of it was entirely uncalled for.
No it wasn't, and you know it.
That's why it pissed you off.
Of course it was uncalled for and you missed the mark if you thought it would piss me off. Just because I didn't give it a pass doesn't mean I took for anything more than it is.

So you don't care if they start violating your 2nd Amendment rights?
Do you not care if BLM acts just like the Klan did 50 years ago?
I don't agree that Black Lives Matter acts just like the Klan did x number of years ago and I especially don't agree with you if you're claiming that the ONLY reason the jurors came back with a "guilty" verdict on all three counts is because they were threatened and/or intimidated.

There has never been a doubt in my mind and the minds of MANY others (not every one of them black either) that Chauvin is guilty of unlawfully taking George Floyd's life under color of law (as a police officer). My only doubt was would he be held accountable for having done so.

It wouldn't surprise me at all to discover that the jurors were threatened to NOT convict him and if that situation they showed even more bravery for agreeing to be jurors on this case.

And just for the record, there were Klansmen embedded in every facet of the society including the court system and they were very effective at ensuring the denial of justice to black people.
 

PoliticalChic

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You must be fairly young if you believe this to be drama.

People were threatened, had their livlihoods destroyed and even killed for registering black people down south to vote or voting.

Surely you've heard of these young men right?
The murders of Chaney, Goodman, and Schwerner, also known as the Freedom Summer murders, the Mississippi civil rights workers' murders or the Mississippi Burning murders, refers to three activists who were abducted and murdered in Neshoba County, Mississippi, in June 1964 during the Civil Rights Movement. The victims were James Chaney from Meridian, Mississippi, and Andrew Goodman and Michael Schwerner from New York City. All three were associated with the Council of Federated Organizations (COFO) and its member organization, the Congress of Racial Equality (CORE). They had been working with the Freedom Summer campaign by attempting to register African Americans in Mississippi to vote. Since 1890 and through the turn of the century, southern states had systematically disenfranchised most black voters by discrimination in voter registration and voting.​
The three men had traveled from Meridian to the community of Longdale to talk with congregation members at a black church that had been burned; the church had been a center of community organization. The trio was arrested following a traffic stop for speeding outside Philadelphia, Mississippi, escorted to the local jail, and held for a number of hours.[1] As the three left town in their car, they were followed by law enforcement and others. Before leaving Neshoba County, their car was pulled over. The three were abducted, driven to another location, and shot to death at close range. The three men's bodies were taken to an earthen dam where they were buried.[1]
And now that the roles are being reversed, all that wrong shit is all right now?

Is that how it is?





They wanted freedom.

Your sorry ass just wants to be the one holding the whip.
What roles are being reversed? The point of the article is that there are factions in society who when they don't get their way but most particularly when they feel that they are beginning to lose power, begin to retaliate in a myriad of ways, but attempting to eviscerate Constitutional protections is particularly heinous in my opinion.

You may not care about the right to peaceably assemble but what if it were a 2nd Amendment right they were creating laws to punish you for? You would be okay with that? Yes you have the Constitutional right to keep and bear arms but if you dare to exercise that right you can kiss goodbye any further assistance from the government, including unemployment insurance if your boss decides he doesn't want you working there because he knows you spend time on the weekend at the shooting range, or that you're a gun owner, or that you carry. That's not even lawful HOWEVER if they pass a law allowing it, even if it is eventually found to be unconstitutional, while it's the law of the land a lot of people will be harmed and they know this.

In any case, your comment and the personal nature of it was entirely uncalled for.
No it wasn't, and you know it.
That's why it pissed you off.
Of course it was uncalled for and you missed the mark if you thought it would piss me off. Just because I didn't give it a pass doesn't mean I took for anything more than it is.

So you don't care if they start violating your 2nd Amendment rights?
Do you not care if BLM acts just like the Klan did 50 years ago?



Of course not!

Both are military wings of the Democrat Party.

Liberal historian Eric Foner writes that the Klan was “…a military force serving the interests of the Democratic Party…” Foner, “Reconstruction: America’s Unfinished Revolution, 1863-1877,” p. 425
 

Hellokitty

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If people have Constitutional or other legally protected rights but due to fear of repercussions that may follow, opt to not exercise them, then what's the point of having them? Passing laws that allow others to intimidate or encroach upon any of our rights is sending us back in time to when black people had no legal rights or protections against harm caused by racists.

At least this is what the proposition of these laws makes me think, first they attacked and further restrict voting rights, now they're attaching the 1st Amendment protections for peaceable assembly and petitioning our government for a redress of grievances?

Instead of looking to stamp out police brutality, (mostly Republican) politicians are turning against the movement leading our overdue national reckoning.
Image: BLM protest

A police officer holds down a protester while another, rear, sprays pepper spray during a Black Lives Matter protest in Boston on May 29.Joseph Prezioso / AFP via Getty Images file

April 21, 2021, 1:31 AM PDT
By Dorian Warren, co-president of Community Change and Seft Hunter, director of Black-led organizing at Community Change
On Tuesday, a jury in Minnesota found former police officer Derek Chauvin guilty on all three charges in the death of George Floyd: second- and third-degree murder and second-degree manslaughter. As the verdict was read, communities across the country came together — as they have for the past year — to demonstrate against police violence and for racial justice.

The fact that Chauvin will probably be going to jail may provide some solace to Floyd’s family. But true justice remains elusive.

The fact that Chauvin will probably be going to jail may provide some solace to Floyd's family. But true justice remains elusive. Consider the dozens
of states that are gearing up to pass sweeping crackdowns on our First Amendment right to protest peacefully.

Protests are vital in America. Protests put pressure on Minnesota authorities to charge Chauvin, on city and state officials to evaluate their police budgets (to mixed success) and on Congress to draft bills like the George Floyd Justice in Policing Act, which passed the House but will need bipartisan support to pass the Senate.

This is the kind of power these lawmakers are trying to curb.

Our right to assemble and petition the government for redress of grievances is embedded in our Constitution, and it forms the bedrock of who we are — and aspire to be — as a democracy. But once again, some politicians are doing what they do best: trying to take away the rights (especially) of Black and brown people to show our discontent and blame us for speaking out against the brutality we face every day.

In Minnesota, the center of last year's demonstrations, the Legislature is considering a bill that would make anyone convicted of a crime at a protest ineligible for state loans, grants or assistance, including student loans, food stamps, rental assistance and unemployment benefits.
Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis signed a sweeping law just this week that imposes new penalties for people arrested at demonstrations and offers more immunity for people who hit protesters with vehicles....


So you support allowing people engaging in protest to committee criminal acts?
 

Race Burley

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If people have Constitutional or other legally protected rights but due to fear of repercussions that may follow, opt to not exercise them, then what's the point of having them? Passing laws that allow others to intimidate or encroach upon any of our rights is sending us back in time to when black people had no legal rights or protections against harm caused by racists.

At least this is what the proposition of these laws makes me think, first they attacked and further restrict voting rights, now they're attaching the 1st Amendment protections for peaceable assembly and petitioning our government for a redress of grievances?

Instead of looking to stamp out police brutality, (mostly Republican) politicians are turning against the movement leading our overdue national reckoning.
Image: BLM protest

A police officer holds down a protester while another, rear, sprays pepper spray during a Black Lives Matter protest in Boston on May 29.Joseph Prezioso / AFP via Getty Images file

April 21, 2021, 1:31 AM PDT
By Dorian Warren, co-president of Community Change and Seft Hunter, director of Black-led organizing at Community Change
On Tuesday, a jury in Minnesota found former police officer Derek Chauvin guilty on all three charges in the death of George Floyd: second- and third-degree murder and second-degree manslaughter. As the verdict was read, communities across the country came together — as they have for the past year — to demonstrate against police violence and for racial justice.

The fact that Chauvin will probably be going to jail may provide some solace to Floyd’s family. But true justice remains elusive.

The fact that Chauvin will probably be going to jail may provide some solace to Floyd's family. But true justice remains elusive. Consider the dozens
of states that are gearing up to pass sweeping crackdowns on our First Amendment right to protest peacefully.

Protests are vital in America. Protests put pressure on Minnesota authorities to charge Chauvin, on city and state officials to evaluate their police budgets (to mixed success) and on Congress to draft bills like the George Floyd Justice in Policing Act, which passed the House but will need bipartisan support to pass the Senate.

This is the kind of power these lawmakers are trying to curb.

Our right to assemble and petition the government for redress of grievances is embedded in our Constitution, and it forms the bedrock of who we are — and aspire to be — as a democracy. But once again, some politicians are doing what they do best: trying to take away the rights (especially) of Black and brown people to show our discontent and blame us for speaking out against the brutality we face every day.

In Minnesota, the center of last year's demonstrations, the Legislature is considering a bill that would make anyone convicted of a crime at a protest ineligible for state loans, grants or assistance, including student loans, food stamps, rental assistance and unemployment benefits.
Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis signed a sweeping law just this week that imposes new penalties for people arrested at demonstrations and offers more immunity for people who hit protesters with vehicles....
Why do you, over and over and over, keep calling violent scum protestors? You have zero cred.
 

freyasman

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You must be fairly young if you believe this to be drama.

People were threatened, had their livlihoods destroyed and even killed for registering black people down south to vote or voting.

Surely you've heard of these young men right?
The murders of Chaney, Goodman, and Schwerner, also known as the Freedom Summer murders, the Mississippi civil rights workers' murders or the Mississippi Burning murders, refers to three activists who were abducted and murdered in Neshoba County, Mississippi, in June 1964 during the Civil Rights Movement. The victims were James Chaney from Meridian, Mississippi, and Andrew Goodman and Michael Schwerner from New York City. All three were associated with the Council of Federated Organizations (COFO) and its member organization, the Congress of Racial Equality (CORE). They had been working with the Freedom Summer campaign by attempting to register African Americans in Mississippi to vote. Since 1890 and through the turn of the century, southern states had systematically disenfranchised most black voters by discrimination in voter registration and voting.​
The three men had traveled from Meridian to the community of Longdale to talk with congregation members at a black church that had been burned; the church had been a center of community organization. The trio was arrested following a traffic stop for speeding outside Philadelphia, Mississippi, escorted to the local jail, and held for a number of hours.[1] As the three left town in their car, they were followed by law enforcement and others. Before leaving Neshoba County, their car was pulled over. The three were abducted, driven to another location, and shot to death at close range. The three men's bodies were taken to an earthen dam where they were buried.[1]
And now that the roles are being reversed, all that wrong shit is all right now?

Is that how it is?





They wanted freedom.

Your sorry ass just wants to be the one holding the whip.
What roles are being reversed? The point of the article is that there are factions in society who when they don't get their way but most particularly when they feel that they are beginning to lose power, begin to retaliate in a myriad of ways, but attempting to eviscerate Constitutional protections is particularly heinous in my opinion.

You may not care about the right to peaceably assemble but what if it were a 2nd Amendment right they were creating laws to punish you for? You would be okay with that? Yes you have the Constitutional right to keep and bear arms but if you dare to exercise that right you can kiss goodbye any further assistance from the government, including unemployment insurance if your boss decides he doesn't want you working there because he knows you spend time on the weekend at the shooting range, or that you're a gun owner, or that you carry. That's not even lawful HOWEVER if they pass a law allowing it, even if it is eventually found to be unconstitutional, while it's the law of the land a lot of people will be harmed and they know this.

In any case, your comment and the personal nature of it was entirely uncalled for.
No it wasn't, and you know it.
That's why it pissed you off.
Of course it was uncalled for and you missed the mark if you thought it would piss me off. Just because I didn't give it a pass doesn't mean I took for anything more than it is.

So you don't care if they start violating your 2nd Amendment rights?
Do you not care if BLM acts just like the Klan did 50 years ago?
I don't agree that Black Lives Matter acts just like the Klan did x number of years ago and I especially don't agree with you if you're claiming that the ONLY reason the jurors came back with a "guilty" verdict on all three counts is because they were threatened and/or intimidated.

There has never been a doubt in my mind and the minds of MANY others (not every one of them black either) that Chauvin is guilty of unlawfully taking George Floyd's life under color of law (as a police officer). My only doubt was would he be held accountable for having done so.

It wouldn't surprise me at all to discover that the jurors were threatened to NOT convict him and if that situation they showed even more bravery for agreeing to be jurors on this case.

And just for the record, there were Klansmen embedded in every facet of the society including the court system and they were very effective at ensuring the denial of justice to black people.
I know you don't agree.

Doesn't make me wrong, though.
 
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You jokers sound like trump more and more every day.
When you don't like the outcome:
It was rigged!!!
They cheated!!!!
SSDD

wth is wrong with asking questions?

Further, why can't you respond to questions without insulting people?

Seems you only question the ones where a white cop is held accountable.
 

PoliticalChic

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You jokers sound like trump more and more every day.
When you don't like the outcome:
It was rigged!!!
They cheated!!!!
SSDD

wth is wrong with asking questions?

Further, why can't you respond to questions without insulting people?


The defining characteristics of Biden voters: they don't question, don't think, don't read.
 

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